Title: Buried Software Utilities in the Simtel
and 'pcmag' Archives created by PC Magazine

Note: as of 9/2006, you find this archive still on the net:

Early Univ. Michigan PCMAG archives


                W. Curtiss Priest, Director, CITS
           Center for Information, Technology & Society
              466 Pleasant St., Melrose, MA  02176
              Voice: 781-662-4044  BMSLIB@MIT.EDU

                     CITS Home Page


                     Software Technical Note
                         March 22, 2001

                 Buried Software Utilities in the
          Simtel and 'pcmag' Archives created by PC Magazine



Introduction
------------

One of the best documented sources of PC utilities is a regular feature of PC
Magazine.

Yet, when these got archived in Simtel (and elsewhere), they were bundled with
others in ZIP files with only the magazine volume and number, and single word
descriptors of what each issue contained.

As a result, some "leaked" out and became stand-alone utility entries at various
BBSs and sites, but not very regularly.

The same thing happened to authors who created multiple utilities and then
published them to the net, again, as one large ZIP file.

Those are even harder to find something useful in because there aren't often
single word descriptors of what's inside.

Solution
--------

The Internet at this point in time -- the year 2001 -- does not provide free
access to journal archive citations or full text.

You can go some place on the net, such as www.zdnet.com, but the entire PC
Magazine archives require a subscription.

You can also go to OCLC or InfoTrac which contain citations and often full text,
but you need, again, to subscribe to gain access.

Some of us with college affiliation can access the "citation databases" as part
of the school's extended library resources -- a "site license."

And, some of InfoTrac (they have many "levels" of service) can be found at some
public libraries.  And, if you are lucky, you are allowed to bring a floppy
disk, and "download" citations (and full text).

Search Strategy
---------------

Folk on the net are used to search engines where there is essentially "one
field."  But, in magazines and books there are multiple fields (author,
publisher, date, etc.)

So a search strategy at such a site (search strategies that pre-dated the
Internet by 20-30 years) involves the use of both boolean operators and field
designations.

And, unlike free stuff on the net, part of the reason these resources cost more
is someone often attaches very specific keywords or descriptors to the items, so
that the search can be very specific -- obtaining articles you want and ignoring
the others.

The search statement at OCLC's Microcomputer Index database looks like:

    ((so: pc and so: magazine)) and (de= "utility program") not
        ((pt: software and pt: review))

These finds all utility programs in Pc Magazine except for those articles tagged
"software review."

This produced 163 articles.  Without the removing of the software reviews, there
were 1200 articles.

But, OCLC coveres only the period from 1989 to the present.

To fill in the gap for the earlier utilities (DOS utilities), the Infotrac
database called Gen'l Reference Ctr (Magazine Index) was also searched.

The search statement there was:

    Jn (Pc magazine) and Ke (Utility Program)
        not Ke (software review) not Ke (evaluation)

This search was similar to the above, but notice that the field descriptors
differ and I also excluded articles tagged as "evaluation."  For the period 1985
to 1999 there were 72 articles (but over double that if the ones tagged
"evaluation" were not removed).

One other Oddity
----------------

Since descriptors are assigned by hand, the numbers of articles vary between
databases with the same search strategy.

In this case, when I also searched Infotrac from 1989 to the present
(corresponding to the period in OCLC which produced 163 articles), the search
only returned 75 articles for that entire period.

And, more curious, some of the articles returned in Infotrac's smaller set were
some not in the OCLC search.

But, upon examination of obviously missing articles in the Infotrac search, I
found that unlike OCLC, many articles were simply tagged "utilities" rather than
"Utility Program."  Running yet another search:

    Jn(Pc magazine)and Ke(Utilities)
        not Ke(software review)not Ke(evaluation)not Ke(Utility Program)

produced another 456 articles.  While some of these articles sometimes describe
non-PC Magazine written utilities, there was no way to reduce the set via the
search statement.

So, for completeness, this document contains

    I.  The 163 articles from OCLC
   II.  The 72 articles from Infotrac from 1985 to 1989
  III.  The 75 articles from Infotrac from 1989 to the present
            with tag "Utility Program"
   IV.  The remaining 456 articles from Infotrac from 1985 to the
            present with tag "Utilities" but not "Utility Program"
    V.  A sample Simtel directory of DOS PC Magazine archives
        for January 14, 2001
            ftp://mirrors.aol.com/pub/simtelnet/msdos/pcmag/00_INDEX.TXT
   VI.  An expanded listing of the files named in those archives
            ftp://mirrors.aol.com/pub/simtelnet/msdos/pcmag/00_PCMAG.ZIP
  VII.  Out-of-Print books about PC Magazine Utilities
 VIII.  Programs listed in 1988 DOS POWER TOOLS

How to use this document:
------------------------

Using your wordprocessor you can search on words and find articles that mention
them.  When searching on file names, you may wish to use case-insensitive
searching as Simtel entries are mostly in lower case.

If you use the shareware utility "LOOKFOR.COM" (curiously not in the Simtel
archives) you can do proximity searching of this file.  LOOKFOR, for example,
will let you find multiple words that are close together.  (If you want this
program, just e-mail me.)

Once you find what you want, you can then match the volume and number with the
Simtel archives for files up to 1997 or for files later than 1991, you
can access the ZDnet ftp site matching on year, month, day of
the issue (see below).

There may still be archives at Compuserve under their Computer Pro area
($4.95/mo. subscription).

As for fairly recent files (last few years) Ziff-Davis does operate
a free download site (at this time):


PcMag Downloads

So, for example, the recent Petzold program (below) ClockRack
can be found by entering ClockRack in the search box.  The
download contains the source, the .hlp help file, and the
executable.  It does not include the article about the program
but the download page does contain an extended description
of the program.

Curiously, searching on LFNDir (below) not only turned up
the program, but also "Utilities - 1998" and "Utilities -- F to L"

But, if you try searching for these directly, they don't
appear.

These categories were listed under a blue banner called "Top PC
Magazine Items" in the listings for LFNDir.

And, if you search on "Utilities" you come across a "Utilities
Guide" -- but this appears to be a search area for commercial
products.  If you try to go to "The Latest Utilities: PC
Magazine Utilities Discussion" you must subscribe at $4.95/mo.
And the "Top Downloads" only lists programs where the word
'utilities' is in the actual name of the the file.

However, there is a short cut to "Utilities" on one of the
bars (and in the frame to the left under "Pick a Category"):

PcMag Utilities

There is also a path to here labeled "Software Library's
Utilities" from the "Utilities" search above.

And here, a search on "Utilities" produces 57 hits from
and area:

PcMag Hotfiles
via their use of the Thunderstone "texis" search engine.  And in all
cases various shareware utilities from other sources are
mixed in with any written by a PC Magazine writer/programmer.

There is no sense of inclusivity but rather "popularity"
of the programs listed here.

Alternatively, there is an FTP area for PC Magazine at
Ziff-Davis:

    ftp://zdftp.zdnet.com/pcmag
    ftp://ftp.zdnet.com/pcmag

The first directory and site was not obvious.  When downloading
a file from the web site, I noticed it was downloading
from the above server.  So I put ftp://zdftp.zdnet.com
in my browser and came to the root directory.  I presume
'zdftp' is a mirror site for 'ftp.'

Here the earliest magazine archive is the year 1991.  To
some that will sound very old and to me that sounds fairly
late.  Most of the DOS utilities were written before this date.

They give this listing example:

    /pcmag/1999/0323 = March 23rd, 1999 issue

One disturbing problem.  If I go to do an FTP search at

Now, broken Lycos FTP

and enter the file 2both.zip that I found under /pcmag/1991/0312,
it does NOT find the file at the ZD site.

The files in the MSDOS section of Simtel end in 1997.  Some Windows
utilities are mixed in with the "MSDOS archives."  The citations
here cover both MSDOS and Windows.

I am always bothered when files are available on the net, by
everyone relying on the originator, here, PC Magazine.  Already
the files prior to 1991 are missing from the site.  What's
to happen in another few years?  Will 91-95 disappear?  Or, worse,
will access become restricted in some way?

Comments to improve this document are welcome.

**************************************************************************

    I.  The 163 articles from OCLC

   Record No.: 00PI10-060
       Author: Seymour, Jim
        Title: A successor to Magellan, R.I.P.?
       Source: PC Magazine (October 3, 2000) v23 n5 p107
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: Lotus Development; SilverLakeTech.com
 Product Name: Magellan; PC Data Finder 5.5
     Abstract: Describes a search for a file-finding program to replace the
               discontinued Magellan utility from Lotus Development Corp.
               Mentions that Magellan quickly searches and indexes the text
               content of the user's hard drive, generates a list of files
               containing a user-specified key word, and provides one-click
               entry into the file. Explains that Magellan was discontinued
               because Lotus did not know what to make of it and how to
               sell it priced at $70 to $100. Introduces PC Data Finder 5.5
               ($99) from SilverLakeTech.co Indicates that it comes close
               to the functionality of Magellan. Cites PC Data Finder's
               support of multiple file formats, Boolean logic, and
               interface similar to Windows. Indicates, however, that price
               may pose a hindrance to some users. Concludes with the
               recommendation to take advantage of a 15-day trial offer.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Utility Program; Indexing; Market Research;
               Disk Files; Document Management System
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PIO9-037
       Author: Petzold, Charles
        Title: ClockRack tracks world time -- A configurable rack of clocks
               on your desktop eases time-zone confusion
       Source: PC Magazine (September 1, 2000) v19 n15 p131
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Product Name: ClockRack
     Abstract: Describes ClockRack, a free Windows-compatible utility that
               can be downloaded from the "PC Magazine" Web site. Defines
               ClockRack as a virtual array of clocks that is displayed on
               the microcomputer system's desktop. Explains that ClockRack
               helps users keep track of time in various parts of the world
               and eliminates the tediousness of mentally computing the
               time difference. Says that ClockRack can be configured as an
               auto-hide application bar so that it does not take up
               desktop space when not needed. Cites features such as
               display of any number of clocks, choice between analog and
               digital representations, large database of world locations
               to which the user can add location, and time-setting
               function based on National Institute of Standards and
               Technology (NIST) Time Service Centers. Includes four screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Clock; Realtime; Utility Program; International
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-253
       Author: Petzold, Charles
        Title: Seize the moment -- ScreenSeize lets you capture and save
               any portion of your screen
       Source: PC Magazine (May 23, 2000) v19 n10 p127
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Product Name: ScreenSeize
     Abstract: Describes ScreenSeize, a free utility program from "PC
               Magazine." Explains that ScreenSeize enables users to save
               images from a computer screen and has been designed to meet
               all contingencies. Indicates that the Windows operating
               system has a screen-capture facility with limited uses.
               Mentions that in ScreenSeize, capture can be activated by a
               click on the mouse button, a hotkey, or a timer. Cites an
               Automatic Save option for capturing multiple images in
               sequence. Presents the choice to capture an entire screen, a
               selected object or area, a dialog box, or an application
               window. Points out that ScreenSeize works under Windows NT
               4.0, Windows 98, and Windows 95. Says that the magazine's
               Web site contains ScreenSeize's programming information.
               Includes three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Information Storage; User Interface
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-252
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Windows start-up and shutdown screens -- Change the images
               displayed every time your PC boots and shuts down
       Source: PC Magazine (May 23, 2000) v19 n10 p123-124
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: Microsoft
 Product Name: Microsoft Windows
     Abstract: Presents a method for changing the images displayed onscreen
               during Windows PC startup and shutdown. Explains that
               Windows will display the Logo.sys file found in the root
               directory of the boot drive, which represents a bitmap in
               the correct format. Mentions that if Logo.sys is missing,
               Windows will extract the default startup bitmap from Io.sys.
               Indicates that Logo.sys is a simple bitmap file while Io.sys
               is a system file that should not be loaded into the Paint
               application. Says that Logow.sys and Logos.sys files store
               the shutdown bitmaps. Describes how to create startup and
               shutdown bitmaps using Paint. Suggests how to rename
               Logow.sys and Logos.sys in order to prevent their display.
               Elaborates on the procedure for restoring the default bitmap
               displays. Includes a sidebar and two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Computer Instruction; User Interface; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-229
       Author: Gunnerson, Gary
        Title: Collaborative Web publishing
       Source: PC Magazine (May 23, 2000) v19 n10 p149
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Interwoven; NetObjects; Worldweb.net
 Product Name: TeamSite 4.0; NetObjects Authoring Server 2000; Expressroom
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to collaborative Web page authoring
               tools. Presents comparisons of three products from three
               providers on roles and permissions, Web site and page
               design, collaboration, and publishing. Products reviewed
               (and rating on a scale of one to five) are: Expressroom
               ($75,000) from Worldweb.net of Alexandria, VA (888,703) - 2;
               NetObjects Authoring Server 2000 ($1,395) from NetObjects
               Inc. of Redwood City, CA (650) - 3; and TeamSite 4.0
               ($70,000) from Interwoven Inc. of Sunnyvale, CA (408) - 4.
               Explains that TeamSite stands out because of flexibility in
               letting users define their own roles, ease of dragging and
               dropping an existing Web site into it,integration with
               third-party Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) tools, and a
               function that lets multiple contributors split off duplicate
               branches to work on them separately and then merge them
               again later. Includes two screen displays and a product
               summary.
Descriptor(s): Web Page Authoring; Web Tools; Web Publishing; Utility
               Program; Collaboration; Workgroup Computing; Client-Server
               Computing
        Grade: B C D
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-220
       Author: Mendelson, Edward Harris, Jack
        Title: Design a great site -- Whether you need an interactive Web
               site or a basic home page, today's Web authoring products
               make it easier than ever to build...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 23, 2000) v19 n10 p134-152
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to Web page authoring tools.
               Presents a table comparing eight tools from eight providers
               on 15 criteria including interface, wizards, predefined Web
               effects, ease of complex Web site design, and support for
               JavaScript and Dynamic Hypertext Markup Language (DHTML).
               Products reviewed (and rating on a scale of one to five)
               are: Adobe GoLive 4.01 ($300) from Adobe Systems Inc. - 4;
               Dreamweaver 3 ($299) from Macromedia Inc 5; HomeSite 4.5.1
               ($89) from Allaire Corp. - 4; HoTMetaL PRO 6. ($100) from
               SoftQuad Software Inc. - 3; Microsoft FrontPage 2000 ($150)
               from Microsoft Corp. - 5; Namo WebEditor 3.06 ($79) from
               Enova Software Inc. - 4; NetObjects Fusion 5.0 ($299) from
               NetObjects Inc.- 4; and Trellix Web 2.6 ($69) from Trellix
               Corp. - 3. Explains that Dreamweaver and Microsoft FrontPage
               received the "Editors' Choice" merit. Includes fifteen
               screen displays, three sidebars, a glossary, two tabl! es,
               and ten product summaries.
Descriptor(s): Web Page Authoring; Web Tools; Web Sites; Design; Utility
               Program; Application Development; Client-Server Computing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI06-049
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Sweep away the scraps -- FindOrphans lets you locate and
               safely remove orphaned files
       Source: PC Magazine (June 6, 2000) v19 n11 p139
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Product Name: FindOrphans
     Abstract: Presents FindOrphans, a free utility from "PC Magazine"
               which scans all local hard drives and analyzes the
               dependency relationships among the files in Microsoft
               Windows 95, 98, NT 4.0, and 2000. Says that it can scan and
               remember the files on any number of removable disks.
               Mentions that when scanning is completed, it identifies
               orphan files and problem files. Notes that it provides a way
               to safely and reversibly remove orphan files. Points out
               that FindOrphans had been inspired by the earlier utility
               FDDLLs. States that FindOrphans addresses the situation in
               which support files remain on the hard drive after a program
               has been uninstalled. Declares that orphan files are support
               files that no longer have any programs interdependent with
               it. Says that orphan files take up hard disk space for no
               purpose. Includes four screen displays.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Utility Program; Disk Files
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI06-015
       Author: Clyman, John
        Title: Know your site -- Whether you're in charge of designing,
               coding, or the bottom line, don't assume you know everything
               about your Web site - until...
       Source: PC Magazine (June 6, 2000) v19 n11 p169-182
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: WebTrends; WebSideStory; Active Concepts; Sane Solutions;
               MyComputer.com
 Product Name: WebTrends Log Analyzer 5.0; HitBox Pro; Funnel Web
               Professional 3.6; NetTracker 4.5 Enterprise; SuperStats
               Professional
     Abstract: Presents a buyer's guide to Web management utility programs.
               Displays a table comparing five products from five providers
               on setup, ease of use, performance, automation, reporting,
               analysis, configurability, result value, and guidance.
               Products reviewed (and rating on a scale of one to five)
               are: Funnel Web Professional 3.6 ($499) from Active Concepts
               of San Francisco, CA (800, 415) - 5; HitBox Pro ($19) from
               WebSideStory Inc. of San Diego, CA (858) - 5; NetTracker 4.5
               Enterprise ($995) from Sane Solutions LLC of North
               Kingstown, RI (800, 401) - 4; SuperStats Professional ($19)
               from MyComputer.com Inc. of Orem, UT (801) - 3; WebTrends
               Log Analyzer 5.0 ($499) from WebTrends Corp. of Portland, OR
               (503) - 5. Indicates that WebTrends received the "Editors'
               Choice" merit. Includes five sidebars, two tables, three
               diagrams, four photos, three screen displays, and five
               product summaries.
Descriptor(s): Web Management; Web Tools; Client-Server Computing; Utility
               Program; Benchmark Testing
        Grade: A A A B C
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI04-236
       Author: Sipe, Steven E
        Title: Size Windows with precision
       Source: PC Magazine (April 18, 2000) v19 n8 p157
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Product Name: WinSize
     Abstract: Presents the free WinSize utility program from "PC
               Magazine." Mentions that WinSize is for setting a window in
               the Microsoft Windows operating systems to exact dimensions,
               which helps in Web page building and in adjusting the
               monitor's aspect ratio. Mentions the absence of a
               window-resizing function in Microsoft Windows. Presents the
               initial step of positioning the mouse cursor on the edge of
               a window and clicking the left button to view the window's
               dimensions in pixels. Explains that the new dimensions will
               appear in the small yellow ToolTip status window. Says that
               it is compatible with Windows 95, Windows NT 4.0, and
               Windows 98. Presents the suggestion to use the WinSize Plus!
               pack to see the dimensions update continuously during
               resizing within Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 95. Includes
               three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Windows; User Interface; Design; Web Page
               Authoring
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI03-019
       Author: Brown, Bruce Brown, Marge
        Title: Manage Web page printing -- Tame Web page printing using
               your browser, Office applications and some handy utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (March 7, 2000) v19 n5 p115-118
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: Microsoft; Netscape Communications; Hewlett-Packard
 Product Name: Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0; Navigator 4.08; Web
               PrintSmart 2.0 Plus!
     Abstract: Discusses typical problems encountered with Web page
               printing. Cites losing content outside print margins,
               wasting paper when only a few lines print on a page,
               printing a whole page when only a portion is needed, and
               tying up a printer for a long time to print huge Web page
               graphics. States that both Internet Explorer 5.0 and
               Netscape Navigator 4.08 have printing shortcuts that can
               save time and paper and generate useful output. Instructs on
               specific printing techniques and options to use with
               Internet Explorer 5.0 and Netscape Navigator 4.08. Focuses
               on Web page-printing utilities that are being developed by
               printer manufacturers. Features the HP Web PrintSmart 2.0
               Plus! ($30) from Hewlett-Packard and WebRecord, which is
               bundled with Creative Pro software from Canon. Contains five
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Web Tools; Publishing; Printer; Web Browsers; Web Sites;
               Tutorial; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-066
       Author: Cohen, Alan
        Title: Window dressing
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p234
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to third-party "Windows-dressing"
               utilities. Says that these utilities enable the user to
               customize the Windows user interface. Products reviewed and
               ratings given on a scale of one to five are: WindowBlinds
               1.2 ($19) from Stardock Corp. - 5; Chroma 1.02 ($20) from
               Thematic Software - 4; Webshots Desktop ($0) from The
               Webshot Corp. - 4; Cool Desk 99 v2.85 ($12) from ShellToys -
               4; NeoPlanet 5.1 ($0) from NeoPlanet - 5; Hotbar.com ($0)
               from Hotbar.com - 3. Explains that WindowBlinds 1.2 enables
               users to change the style and appearance of the interface in
               Windows and in applications, with hundreds of themes that
               replicate a certain look. Notes that NeoPlanet 5.1 offers a
               browser that works with AOL and Internet Explorer 4 or
               later. Includes two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Operating Systems; User Interface; Utility Program; Windows;
               Interface; Web Browsers
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-065
       Author: Dreier, Troy Graven, Matthew
        Title: PDA tools
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p233
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to utility programs for personal
               digital assistants (PDAs). Products reviewed and ratings
               given on a scale of one to five are: Sign-On ($19) from CIC
               (800) - 4; MagicText ($17) from Synergy Solutions (800) - 5;
               BackupBuddy NG ($29) from Intelligent Systems (800) - 5;
               Launch 'Em 2 ($10) from Synergy Solutions - 5; StarTap 4.5
               ($10) from Thumbs Up Soft - 5; bUseful Utilities Pak 2.0
               ($59) from Bsquare Corp. - 5; PocketFlash 1.0 Beta ($0) from
               Conduits Technologies - 4. Cites MagicText's collection of
               editing tools for the Palm platform. Cites BackupBuddy NG's
               ability to reinstall databases and applications on the Palm.
               Explains that Launch 'Em gives Palm users an intuitive way
               to organize applications. Explains that StarTap lets Windows
               CE users place shortcuts for favored desktop applications.
               Explains that bUseful has ten tools that will improve the
               Windows CE experience. Includes two photos.!
Descriptor(s): Personal Digital Assistant; Utility Program; Mobile
               Computing; Hand-held Computer; Portable Computer; Editor;
               Backup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-064
       Author: Randall, Neil
        Title: Surfing & downloading
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p231
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyer's guide to utility programs that extend the
               surfing and downloading functions of Web browsers. Reviews
               15 utilities, dividing them into four categories: download
               managers, bookmark managers, browser toolbars, and ZIP
               utilities. Products reviewed and ratings given on a scale
               from one to five are: Download Accelerator Plus ($0) from
               SpeedBit - 4; Netzip Download Demon 3.2 ($0) from Netzip -
               4; Go!Zilla v3.5 ($0) from Aureate Media - 4; URL Manager
               2000 ($15) from Author Direct Shareware - 4; AcqURL ($35)
               from GT Technologies - 4; Backflip ($0) - 5; Clickmarks ($0)
               - 5; BookMarkBox ($0) - 4; Snippets.com ($0) - 5; EntryPoint
               ($0) - 5; PKzip 2.70 ($39) from PKWare - 5; WinZip ($22)
               from Nico Mak Computing - 5; ZipMagic 2000 ($24) from
               Mijenix Corp. - 5; FreeZip 1.4.8 ($0) - 4; CuteZip ($NA)
               from GlobalScape - 4. Includes one screen display and one
               sidebar.
Descriptor(s): Web Tools; Online Searching; Information Retrieval;
               Compression; Web Browsers; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-063
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: System diagnostics
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p229
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to utility programs that do system
               diagnostics and troubleshooting. Products reviewed and
               ratings given on a scale of one to five are: AMIDiag 6.0
               ($99) from American Megatrends - 5; WinCheckIt 6.5 ($49)
               from TouchStone Software Corp. - 5; SpinRite 5.0 ($89) from
               Gibson Research Corp. - 4; DiskMapper 2 ($49) from
               MicroLogic Corp. - 5; VMware 2.0 ($299) from VMware Inc. -
               5; System Commander 2000 ($49) from V Communications - NA;
               Compuware BoundsChecker 6.2 ($549) from Compuware - 4. Notes
               AMIDiag runs in real-mode DOS to identify all kinds of
               hardware problems. States that WinCheckIt's QuickCheck
               routing runs a quick diagnostic of all system devices. Says
               when it detects a problem, it runs a wizard-style
               troubleshooter, which offers possible solutions. Notes
               DiskMapper provides unparalleled visual representation of
               disk space usage. Says VMware lets user run in multiple OSs
               simultaneously. Includes ! one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Diagnostics; Utility Program; Troubleshooting; Enterprise
               Computing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-062
       Author: Randall, Neil
        Title: Modem user
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p227
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to utility programs that bolster
               the performance of modems. Reviews ten utilities, dividing
               them into two categories: dial-up networking enhancements
               and Internet Protocol (IP) optimizers. Products reviewed and
               ratings given on a scale of one to five are: DUN Manager 2.0
               ($40) from Magenta Systems - 5; Ras+ Dialer 2000 ($17) from
               DigitalWeb - 5; Bob Connect 1.2 ($15) from Bobline - 4;
               ConnectPal Professional 6.40 ($17) from Pendulab - 4;
               Dial-up Toolkit 1.0 ($20) from Mayneware - 4; DU Meter 2.2
               ($15) from Hagel Technologies - 4; SpeedConnect Internet
               Accelerator ($29) from CBS Software - 4; Internet Boost 99
               ($55) from Bonzi Software - 2; Speedlane Internet Optimizer
               ($29) - 2; and Modem Booster 1.0 ($19) from InKline Global -
               2. Includes benchmark test results.
Descriptor(s): Modem; Utility Program; Internet Access; Accelerator; Speed;
               Input/Output; Optimization
Compatibility: IBM PC
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-061
       Author: Giebel, Thomas W
        Title: Web authoring
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p225
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Ipswitch; Watchfire; Mach5 Software; Bradbury Software
 Product Name: WS_FTP Pro 6.05t; Linkbot Pro 5.0; FastStats 2.69a; TopStyle
               1.51
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to Web page authoring utility
               programs. Products reviewed and ratings given on a scale of
               one to five are: TopStyle 1.51 ($50) from Bradbury Software
               - 4; WS_FRP Pro 6.05t ($40) from Ipswitch - 5; Linkbot Pro
               5.0 ($400) from Watchfire - 5; FastStats 2.69a ($100) from
               Mach5 Software - 5. Says that WS_FTP Pro includes utilities
               that let users create scripts for automating the uploading
               of selected files on a scheduled basis. States that Linkbot
               Pro enables decreases the likelihood of broken links when
               adding new pages or updating outdated ones. Adds that it
               also catches many other common errors. Explains that
               FastStats rapidly provides a tree-view set of reports about
               a Web site's visitors, their surfing habits, and what
               brought them to the site. Explains that TopStyle eases the
               creation and design of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS)
               stylesheets. Includes one diagram.
Descriptor(s): Web Page Authoring; Utility Program; Web Tools; Web Sites
Compatibility: IBM PC
        Grade: A A A B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-060
       Author: Randall, Neil
        Title: Windows 2000 tools
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p221-222
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to utility programs that are
               interoperable with Microsoft's Windows 2000 operating
               system. Products reviewed and ratings given on a scale of
               one to five are: PerfectDisk 2000 ($49) from Raxco Software
               - 5; RepairDisk Manager ($149) from Raxco Software - 4;
               Diskeeper 5.0 ($46) from Executive Software International -
               5; ERD Commander ($249) from Winternals Software - 4; ERD
               Commander Professional ($324) from Winternals Software - 4;
               NTFSDOS Pro ($149) from Winternals Software - 4; Remote
               Recover ($299) from Winternals Software - 4; NTFS for
               Windows 98 ($49) from Winternals Software - 4; FastMove 2000
               ($39) from TouchStone Software - 5. Presents five well-known
               utilities still undergoing development: McAfee ViruScan and
               McAfee WebShield SMTP from Network Associates; and Norton
               AntiVirus 2000, pcAnywhere, Norton Ghost, and Mobile
               Essentials from Symantec Corp. Includes three screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Operating Systems; Windows; Utility Program;
               Interoperability; Compatibility; Enterprise Computing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-056
       Author: Schenk, Rob
        Title: Desktop migration; have it your way
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p215-216
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: AlohaBob; Miramar Systems; Altiris
 Product Name: AlohaBob's PC-Relocator 1.2; Desktop DNA 1.0; PC Transplant
               Pro 1.0
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to utility programs for desktop
               migration. Presents a table comparing three products from
               three manufacturers on Windows settings and preferences
               migration, network settings migration, application settings
               migration, data migration, and
               management/logging/monitoring. Products reviewed and ratings
               given on a scale of one to five are: AlohaBob's PC-Relocator
               1.2 ($49) from AlohaBob of Miami Lakes, FL (888, 305) - 3;
               Desktop DNA 1.0 ($245) from Miramar Systems Inc. of Santa
               Barbara, CA (800, 805) - 3; PC Transplant Pro 1.0 ($245)
               from Altiris Inc. of Lindon, UT (888, 801) - 3. Mentions
               that none of the utilities under review merit the "Editors'
               Choice" designation because all of them require in-person
               contact with the desktop PC during preparation for
               migration. Includes three product summaries, one sidebar,
               one screen display, and one table.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Desktop Software; Enterprise Computing;
               Utility Program
Compatibility: IBM PC
        Grade: C C C
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-045
       Author: Alwang, Greg
        Title: Disk utilities -- Grappling with gigabytes
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p204-212
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to disk utility programs. Reviews
               ten utilities, dividing them into three categories:
               rollback, partitioning, and imaging. Products reviewed and
               ratings given on a scale of one to five are: ConfigSafe
               Desktop Edition 3.0 ($40) from imagine LAN Inc. of Nashua,
               NH (800, 603) - 4; GoBack 2.1 ($50) from Wild File Inc. of
               Plymouth, MN (612) - 5; SecondChance 2.0 ($69) from
               PowerQuest Corp. of Orem, UT (800, 801) - 4; PartitionMagic
               5.0 ($69) from PowerQuest Corp. of Orem, UT (800, 801) - 5;
               System Commander 2000 ($79) from V Communications Inc. of
               San Jose, CA (800, 408) - 4; Drive Image 2.02 ($69) from
               PowerQuest Corp. of Orem, UT (800, 801) - 4; and Norton
               Ghost 2000 Personal Edition ($69) from Symantec Corp. of
               Cupertino, CA (800, 408) - 5. Gives GoBack, PartitionMagic,
               and Norton Ghost the "Editors' Choice" designation. Includes
               ten product summaries, three screen displays, three tables,
               an! d one sidebar.
Descriptor(s): Hard Disk Drive; Utility Program; Enterprise Computing;
               Disaster Recovery; Disk Duplicator; Optimization
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-034
       Author: Roberts-Witt, Sarah L
        Title: Filtering; return to sender
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p190-197
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Elron Software; Symantec; Content Technologies; Tumbleweed
               Communications
 Product Name: CommandView Message Inspector; Mail-Gear; MailSweeper;
               WorldSecure/Mail
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to electronic mail filtering
               utility programs. Presents a table comparing four products
               from four manufacturers on installation and administration,
               policy rule creation and customization, filtering controls,
               and message actions. Products reviewed and ratings given on
               a scale of one to five are : CommandView Message Inspector
               ($10,995) from Elron Software Inc. of Burlington, MA (800) -
               4; Mail-Gear ($4,533) from Symantec Corp. of Cupertino, CA
               (408) - 2; MailSweeper ($8,251) from Content Technologies
               Inc. of Kirkland, WA (425) - 3; WorldSecure/Mail ($11,195)
               from Tumbleweed Communications Corp. of Santa Clara, CA
               (800) - 3. Awards CommandView the "Editors' Choice"
               designation. Includes four product summaries, two screen
               displays, one diagram, two sidebars, and two tables.
Descriptor(s): Filtering; Utility Program; Electronic Mail; Security;
               Messaging
        Grade: B D C C
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-028
       Author: Freed, Les
        Title: Corporate antivirus -- Germ warfare at work
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p176-186
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: F-Secure; Panda Software International; Trend Micro;
               Symantec
 Product Name: F-Secure Anti-Virus; Global Virus Insurance 24h-365d;
               NeaTSuite; Norton AntiVirus Enterprise Solution
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to corporate antivirus utility
               programs. Presents a table comparing four products from four
               developers on installation, configuration, management,
               updating, scheduling, notification and logging, scanning,
               and disinfection. Products reviewed and ratings given on a
               scale of one to five are : F-Secure Anti-Virus ($46) from
               F-Secure Corp. of San Jose, CA (888, 408) - 3; Global Virus
               Insurance 24h-365d ($40) from Panda Software International
               of San Francisco, CA (415) - 3; NeaTSuite ($39) from Trend
               Micro Inc. of Cupertino, CA (800, 408) - 4; Norton AntiVirus
               Enterprise Solution ($31) from Symantec Corp. of Santa
               Monica, CA (310) - 4. Notes that Norton AntiVirus received
               the "Editors' Choice" designation. Includes four product
               summaries, one diagram, four screen displays, three
               sidebars, two tables, and benchmark test results.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Utility Program; Security; Enterprise Computing;
               Network Management; Client-Server Computing
        Grade: C C B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-022
       Author: Seltzer, Larry
        Title: Retail antivirus -- Be very afraid
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p164-174
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Aladdin Knowledge Systems; McAfee.com; Norman Data Defense
               Systems; Symantec; Panda Software
 Product Name: eSafe Desktop 2.2; McAfee VirusScan 5.0; Norman Virus
               Control 4.72; Norton AntiVirus 2000; Panda Antivirus
               Platinum 6.15.01
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to antivirus utility programs
               designed for individual users. Presents a table comparing
               five products from five providers on ease of use,
               installation, configuration, scanning, scheduling, updates,
               and performance. Products reviewed and ratings given on a
               scale of one to five are : eSafe Desktop 2.2 (free) from
               Aladdin Knowledge Systems Inc. of Seattle, WA (888) - 3;
               McAfee VirusScan 5.0 public beta ($30) from McAfee.com Corp.
               of Santa Clara, CA (800, 972) - 4; Norman Virus Control 4.72
               ($80) from Norman Data Defense Systems of Fairfax, VA (888,
               703) - 3; Norton AntiVirus 2000 ($36) from Symantec Corp. of
               Cupertino, CA (800, 541) - 5; and Panda Antivirus Platinum
               6.15.01 ($59) from Panda Software of Los Angeles, CA (800,
               415) - 5. Says that Norton AntiVirus 2000 received the
               "Editors' Choice" designation. Includes five product
               summaries, eight screen displays, four sidebars, two tables,
               an! d benchmark test results.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Utility Program; Security; Microcomputer System;
               Macro
Compatibility: IBM PC
        Grade: C B C A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI05-018
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Suites; not so suite
       Source: PC Magazine (May 9, 2000) v19 n9 p156-160
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: McAfee.com; Symantec; Ontrack Data International
 Product Name: McAfee Office 2000 PRO; Norton SystemWorks 2000 Professional
               Edition; Ontrack SystemSuite 2000
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to suites of utility applications.
               Presents a table comparing three products from three
               providers on installation, support, interface, updates,
               diagnostics, uninstaller, registry, security, antivirus,
               integration, and disk maintenance. Products reviewed and
               ratings given on a scale of one to five are : McAfee Office
               2000 PRO ($70) from McAfee.com Corp. of Santa Clara, CA
               (800, 972) - 3; Norton SystemWorks 2000 Professional Edition
               ($99) from Symantec Corp. of Cupertino, CA (800, 541) - 4;
               Ontrack SystemSuite 2000 ($60) from Ontrack Data
               International Inc. of Eden Prairie, MN (800) - 4. Explains
               that Ontrack SystemSuite 2000 received the "Editors' Choice"
               designation for providing the most thorough integration of
               applications. Includes three product summaries, three screen
               displays, four sidebars, benchmark test results, and two
               tables.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Integrated Software; Bundled Software;
               Enterprise Computing; Management
        Grade: C B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 00PI01-203
       Author: Seltzer, Larry
        Title: System savings time -- When the clock runs out on your PC, a
               system recovery tool can take it back to when things were
               working smoothly
       Source: PC Magazine (January 18, 2000) v19 n2 p37-42
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: WildFile; imagine LAN; DuoMark International; LANovation;
               PowerQuest
 Product Name: GoBack 2.1; ConfigSafe Desktop Edition 3.0; 9Lives 1.0;
               PictureTaker Personal Edition 2.0; Second Chance 2.0
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to system recovery tools. Features
               five products from five manufacturers. Explains these tools
               are designed to repair a malfunctioning computer. Says they
               let users un-do anything that was done to a Windows-based
               system, even if Windows will not boot. Says they also help
               clean out a system when performance begins to degrade.
               Recommends GoBack 2.1 ($70) from WildFile Inc. of Plymouth,
               MN (888). Names it PC Magazine Editors' Choice. Also
               includes ConfigSafe Desktop Edition 3.0 ($39.95) from
               imagine LAN Inc. of Nashua, NH (800); 9Lives 1.0 ($49.95)
               from DuoMark International Inc. (310); PictureTaker Personal
               Edition 2.0 ($59.95) from LANovation of Minneapolis, MN
               (800); and SecondChance 2.0 ($70) from PowerQuest Corp. of
               Orem, UT (801). Includes six screen displays and two
               sidebars.
Descriptor(s): Disaster Recovery; Backup; Utility Program; Microcomputer
               System; Software Tools
        Grade: A C C C B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI11-223
       Author: Dvorak, John C
        Title: Inside track
       Source: PC Magazine (November 16, 1999) v18 n20 p85
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: INSIDE TRACK column mentions Intel's shift from Slot 1 to
               Socket 370 processing. Suggests that although Intel claims
               the speed limitations of the slot to be the reason for the
               change, it is nore likely to be a cost issue. Also reports
               on Intel's European public relations snafus, found to be
               quite politically incorrect. Says that Linux converts who
               complained about the high price of Windows are requesting
               their money back for unused preinstalled copies of the
               Windows operating system. Says the Fourmilab site in
               Switzerland features numerous Autodesk strategies as well as
               utilities for UNIX, Windows, and Palm computers, and
               observations of Autodesk founder, John Walker, including a
               diet plan and science fiction. Notes several changes in the
               flash memory market and says the Smart Media format has been
               abandoned by all but Olympus. Mentions the release of a
               seven CD-ROM set of the entire archive of Mad magazine.
Descriptor(s): Microprocessor; Public Relations; International; Operating
               Systems; Competition; Utility Program; Magazines
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-078
       Author: Roberts-Witt, Sarah L
        Title: Make Net work, not play
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p189-204
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: SurfWatch Software; Learning Company, The; Kansmen; Secure
               Computing; NetPartners Internet Solutions
 Product Name: SurfWatch@Work; CyberPatrol for Microsoft Proxy Server;
               LittleBrother Pro; SmartFilter for Microsoft Proxy Server;
               WebSense for Microsoft Proxy Server
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to corporate monitoring/filtering
               solutions for Internet access. Features five products from
               five manufacturers, each designed to make the Internet a
               tool, not a time-waster. Recommends SurfWatch@Work ($995, 50
               users) from SurfWatch Software Inc., a division of Spyglass
               Inc. of Los Altos, CA (800). Names it PC Magazine Editors'
               Choice. Also reviews Cy Patrol for Microsoft Proxy Server
               ($1,395, 100 users) from The Learning Company of Framingham,
               MA (800); LittleBrother Pro ( 10 users) from Kansmen Corp.
               of Milpitas, CA (800, 408); SmartFilt for Microsoft Proxy
               Server ($3,250, 1,000 users) from Secure Computing Corp. of
               San Jose, CA (800); and WebSense for Microsoft Proxy Server
               ($5,000, 1,000 users) from NetPartners Internet Solutions
               Inc. of San Diego, CA (800, 619). Includes five screen
               displays, one diagram, two sidebars, and one scorecard.
Descriptor(s): Filtering; Security; Internet; Utility Program; Software
               Tools
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A B B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-077
       Author: Seltzer, Larry
        Title: Going up, going down
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p185
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Ipswitch; TransSoft; GlobalScape; BulletProof Software; Sean
               Hu
 Product Name: WS_FTP Pro 6.0; FTP Control 3.0 Pro; Cute FTP; BulletProof
               FTP; Cupertino Version 1999-01-22
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to file transfer protocol (FTP)
               utilities. Features five utilities from five manufacturers.
               Explains that Web site builders frequently use FTP clients
               to send the HTML and other files that make up a site to the
               server. Adds that software companies such as Netscape
               maintain FTP servers for users to find and obtain software.
               Notes that these tools are for those who use FTP frequently
               and are not necessary for just the occasional user, since
               the browser's FTP capability would suffice for infrequent
               use. Recommends WS_FTP Pro 6.0 ($37.50, direct) from
               Ipswitch Corp., making it the PC Magazine Editors' Choice.
               Also reviews FTP Control 3.0 Pro ($29, direct) from TranSoft
               Ltd.; Cute FTP ($34.95, direct) from GlobalScape Inc.;
               BulletProof FTP ($29.95, direct) from BulletProof Software;
               and Cupertino, Version 1999-01-22 (free download) from Sean
               Hu. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Data Transmission; Software Distribution; File Management;
               Software Tools; Utility Program
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A B B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-071
       Author: Moskowitz, Jeremy
        Title: Essential NT utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p179-180
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Winternals Software; Executive Software International
 Product Name: BlueSave; Diskeeper for Windows NT Workstation; ERD
               Commander; NTFSDOS Tools; Undelete for Windows NT
               Workstation
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to Microsoft Windows NT
               utilities. Features five products from two manufacturers.
               Explains that these utilities provide troubleshooting for
               PCs running Windows NT Workstation, noting that they are
               designed to handle the complexities of the operating system.
               Products reviewed include: BlueSave ($99) from Winternals
               Software of Austin, TX (512); Diskeeper for Windows NT
               Workstation ($50, street) from Executive Software
               International Inc. of Glendale, CA (800); ERD Commande
               ($249) from Winternals Software; NTFSDOS Tools ($89) from
               Winter Software; and Undelete for Windows NT Workstation
               ($50, stre Executive Software International. Includes two
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Network Operating Systems; Software Tools;
               Network Management; Operating Systems
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows NT
        Grade: B B B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-062
       Author: Haskin, David Rigney, Steve
        Title: Dice & dupe drives
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p173-176
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: PowerQuest; Altiris
 Product Name: PartitionMagic; RapiDeploy
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to disk utilities. Reviews two
               types of disk utilities: disk partitioning (four products)
               and disk imaging (four products). Explains that partitioning
               allows users to better organize data, make more efficient
               use of disk space, and run multiple operating systems.
               Recommends PartitionMagic ($70, street), a partitioning tool
               from PowerQuest Corp. of Orem, UT (800, 801), and names it
               PC Magazine Editors' Choice for the category. Says that disk
               imaging, or disk-cloning, tools takes a snapshot of an
               entire disk or partition and copy it to another disk or one
               or more PCs. Recommends RapiDeploy ($315, 25 users), a disk
               cloning tool from Altris Inc., a division of KeyLabs Inc. of
               Lindon, UT (888, 801). Names it PC Magazine Editors' Choice
               for the category. Includes benchmark test results and one
               sidebar.
Descriptor(s): Optimization; Disk Drive; Utility Program; File Management
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-056
       Author: Rigney, Steve
        Title: Get a safety (Inter)net
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p159-162
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Connected; ackup; Atrieva
 Product Name: Connected Online Backup; ackup; Internet FileZone Plus
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to online backup services.
               Features three services from three vendors. Recommends
               Connected Online Backup($19.95) from Connected Corp. of
               Framingham, MA (888, 508). Names it PC Magazine Editors'
               Choice. Also includes ackup ($99, per year) from ackup Corp.
               of San Diego, CA (888) and Internet FileZone Plus ($9.99,
               per month, 100MB) from Atrieva Corp. of Seattle, WA (888,
               206). Explains that these services are a good alternative
               for backing up important data to a remote server, via the
               Internet. Says all three services use file compression to
               reduce the time requires to perform such backups; however,
               notes that it is still rather time-consuming. States that
               all are automated to some degree and backups can be
               scheduled to run unattended. Concludes that these services
               provide a good alternative for individual users to back up
               important data at a remote location. Includes one scorecard,
               two sidebars, an! d five screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Utility Program; Internet; Remote Computing; Server
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A C B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-050
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Service your PC online
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p156-157
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Trend Micro; Intel Corp.; Network Associates; Symantec
 Product Name: HouseCall; Intel AnswerExpress Support Suite; McAfee Clinic;
               Norton Web Services; Oil Change
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to online utilities services.
               Points out that such online tools can provide services such
               as virus scanning, online backup, and technical support.
               Points out that there are advantages in keeping files up to
               date; however, warns that certain tools are only effective
               if they keep constant watch over the system. Reviews five
               services from four vendors: HouseCall (free) from Trend
               Micro Inc. of Cupertino, CA (800, 408); Intel AnswerExpress
               Support Suite ($49.95, first three months; $9.95, each
               additional month) from Intel Corp. of Hillsboro, OR (888);
               McAfee Clinic ($5.95, per month) from Network Associates
               Inc. of Santa Clara, CA (408); Norton Web Services ($29.95,
               per year; or $3.95 per month) from Symantec Corp. of
               Cupertino, CA (800); and Oil Change ($29.95, per year) from
               Network Associates Inc. of Santa Clara, CA (801). Includes
               six screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Diagnostics; Backup; Internet; Utility Program;
               Troubleshooting; Virus
        Grade: B B B C C
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-045
       Author: Simon, Barry
        Title: Tune up your PC
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p141-150
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Symantec; Touchstone Software; Network Associates
 Product Name: Norton Utilities 4.0; Check-IT 98; First Aid 2000
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to computer diagnostic programs.
               Features four products from three manufacturers. Explains
               that such programs can identify and repair software and
               hardware conflicts, prevent problems that can lead to
               crashes, and enhance performance by defragmenting hard disks
               and cleaning out junk files. Points out that many of these
               tools are now part of Windows and are not necessary unless
               the user is experiencing problems. Adds that they often go
               beyond what Windows programs can do. Names Norton Utilities
               ($50, street) from Symantec Corp. of Cupertino, CA (800) as
               the PC Magazine Editors' Choice. Also reviews Check-IT 98
               ($50, street) from Touchstone Software of North Andover, MA
               (800, 978); First Aid 2000 ($40, street) and Nuts & Bolts 98
               ($50, street) from Network Associates of Santa Clara, CA
               (800, 801). Includes three screen displays, five sidebars,
               and one scorecard.
Descriptor(s): Diagnostics; Utility Program; Software Tools;
               Troubleshooting
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A C B C
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-041
       Author: Rigney, Steve
        Title: Defend your network
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p123-138
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Trend Micro; Symantec; Network Associates
 Product Name: NeaTSuite; Norton AntiVirus for Windows NT/NetWare; Norton
               AntiVirus for Exchange/Notes; Total Virus Defense Enterprise
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to network antivirus solutions.
               Features four solutions from three manufacturers. Says that
               the products protect every network component, including file
               servers, e-mail servers, and client PCs. Adds that all of
               the products are certified by the International Computer
               Security Association (CSA), which means that they can detect
               all of the viruses known to be ``in the wild.'' Recommends
               NeaTSuite ($1,145, 25 users; $1,680, 500 users) from Trend
               Micro Inc. of Cupertino, CA (800, 408). Names it PC Magazine
               Editors' Choice. Also includes Norton AntiVirus for Windows
               NT/NetWare ($499.96, 10 clients) and Norton AntiVirus for
               Exchange/Notes ($795, 25 clients) from Symantec Corp. of
               Cupertino, CA (800, 408); and Total Virus Defense Enterprise
               ($14, per node, 5000 nodes or more) from Network Associates
               Inc. of Santa Clara, CA (800, 408). Includes one scorecard,
               one diagram, two sidebars, two screen displays, ! and
               benchmark test results.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Utility Program; Network Management; Security;
               Networks; Bugs; Enterprise Computing
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-031
       Author: Seltzer, Larry
        Title: Defend your PC
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p111-120
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Symantec
 Product Name: Norton AntiVirus Deluxe
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to desktop antivirus software.
               Features nine products from nine manufacturers. Points out
               that the Internet has made the need for antivirus software
               greater, because it makes it easier to transfer virus files
               to a computer. Explains that the typical antivirus program
               scans files, drives, and folders for viruses, and monitors
               the system in the background against any unusual activity.
               Recommends Norton AntiVirus 5.0 Deluxe ($50, street,
               includes one-year of definition updates) from Symantec Corp.
               of Cupertino, CA (800). Calls it ``the most effective virus
               protection in an easy-to-use package.'' Says that it
               provides a simple and easily accessible interface and
               integrates with Windows 98's task scheduling feature,
               instead of adding its own. Names it the PC Magazine Editors'
               Choice. Includes one diagram, two sidebars, one scorecard,
               benchmark test results, and three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Utility Program; Software Tools; Troubleshooting;
               User Interface; Upgrade
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 98
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-028
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Full-service packages
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p109
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Symantec; Network Associates
 Product Name: Norton SystemWorks; McAfee Office
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to full-service software utilities
               suites. Features two products from two manufacturers. Points
               out that these suites provide a collection of tools at a
               price much lower than if the user bought each utility
               individually and at the same time, provide a single
               installation and one main user interface. Notes that the
               suites provide antivirus, diagnostic, crash protection,
               uninstall, and other utilities. Recommends Norton
               SystemWorks ($69.95, Standard Edition; $99.95, Professional)
               from Symantec Corp. of Cupertino, CA (800). Names it PC
               Magazine Editors' Choice. Also includes McAfee Office
               ($99.95) from Network Associates of Santa Clara, CA (800,
               801). Includes one scorecard and one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Virus; Diagnostics; Software Tools;
               Competition; User Interface
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI05-027
       Author: Morris, John
        Title: The complete PC toolkit
       Source: PC Magazine (May 4, 1999) v18 n9 p100-204
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a special buyers' guide, ``The 1999 Utility
               Guide.'' Features individual buyers' guides to today's
               utility options: full-service packages, desktop antivirus
               solutions, network antivirus solutions, performance
               boosters, online utilities services, online backup
               solutions, Web research solutions, instant messaging, disk
               drive management options, Windows NT-specific tools,
               upload/download management, Internet access management, and
               filtering programs. Points out that utilities are a necessa
               addition to any computer, even one that is configued to
               exact specifications and explains that they are designed to
               help maintain a system's performance and productivity.
               Mentions the influence o the Internet on today's utility
               options, including online services, noting that they provide
               many of the same features traditionally available in
               packaged software. Includes 17 sidebars, three diagrams, six
               scorecards, 30 screen displays,! and three benchmark test
               results.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Software Tools; Virus; Management; Backup;
               Web Tools; Filters
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI02-216
       Author: Brown, Marge
        Title: Utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (February 23, 1999) v18 n4 p143
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Intelligent Systems; Bsquare; Sierra Imaging; Communication
               Intelligence
 Product Name: BackupBuddy 3.05; bPrint 2.0; Image Expert CE 1.0;
               QuickNotes Pro 1.0
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to utilities for Palm OS and
               Windows CE-based handhelds. Features capsule reviews of four
               titles from four manufacturers. Highlights BackupBuddy 3.05
               ($15, street), from Intelligent Systems, distributed by
               PalmPilot Gear H.Q. of Arlington, TX (800). Says it is an
               easy-to-use backup solution for Palm devices and names it a
               finalist in the ZDnet Shareware awards. Also features bPrint
               2.0 ($29.95, direct) a printer utility from Bsquare Corp. of
               Bellevue, WA (888); Image Expert CE 1.0 ($49.95, direct), a
               digital image management solution from Sierra Imaging Inc.
               of Scotts Valley, CA (887); and QuickNotes Pro 1.0 ($39,
               direct), a note-taking utility for keyboard or stylus from
               Communication Intelligence Corp. of Redwood Shores, CA
               (800).
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Software Tools; Backup; Printer; Image
               Management; Image Processing
Compatibility: Palm OS; Microsoft Windows CE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 99PI01-201
       Author: Shaffer, Gail
        Title: Free (and nearly free) stuff and where to get it
       Source: PC Magazine (January 19, 1999) v18 n2 p100-114
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to free and nearly free software
               that can be downloaded from the Internet. Covers seven
               categories, including system utilities, Microsoft Office
               add-ons, Internet tools, communications tools,
               organizational tools, Web development tools, and games.
               Includes product requirements, price, Web address, and a
               brief description. Explains that users can keep freeware,
               trialware is free but crippled and may ultimately time out,
               and shareware programs nag users to register and pay for the
               software, adding that if users do not, the program times out
               after 30 days or so. Includes a sidebar, ``Tips on Web
               downloading and Storage,'' advising users to keep copies,
               Regedit (but only if they are proficient with Regedit),
               check for viruses, save order numbers or similar information
               that appears on the browser before downloading; and create a
               special folder on the disk for downloaded ZIP archives.
               Includes seven scree! n displays and two product source
               guides.
Descriptor(s): Web Sites; Shareware; Web Tools; Games; Utility Program;
               Add-on
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI12-225
       Author: Dvorak, John C
        Title: John C. Dvorak's inside track
       Source: PC Magazine (December 15, 1998) v17 n22 p89
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: Olympus; Sony; Kodak; Microsoft; Adobe Systems
 Product Name: Microsoft PhotoDraw 2000
     Abstract: INSIDE TRACK column notes Olympus's introduction of the
               phrase ``filmless camera'' to promote its digital camera
               line. Claims that Olympus is definitely leading the way in
               digital camera development. Says that Kodak and Sony are
               expected to follow suit. Mentions the increase in
               competition in the photo-manipulation software market,
               including a ``battle'' between Microsoft and Adobe to offer
               the coolest product. Calls Microsoft's PhotoDraw 2000
               fabulous, an easy way to create quick graphics for Web pages
               or presentations. Compares the competition among the image
               market to the once-great competition in the utilities
               market. Notes that this competition quickly ceased, as most
               users were buying two or more of these competing products.
Descriptor(s): Digital Camera; Marketing; Competition; Image Processing;
               Special Effects; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI11-244
       Author: Sipe, Steven E
        Title: Create a personalized start page -- Page1 gives you a
               starting point for accessing the World Wide Web
       Source: PC Magazine (November 17, 1998) v17 n20 p255-257
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: PC Magazine Online
 Product Name: Page1
     Abstract: Discusses Page1, a downloadable utility for Windows 95,
               Windows 98, and Windows NT 4.0 which provides a means for
               customizing one's Web start page. Explains that it is
               available for download free of charge from PC Magazine
               Online, through anonymous FTP, or by mail. Explains that it
               is a simple way to create a start page with one's own list
               of links. Mentions that the source code, written in C++ with
               Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC) is also available for
               programmers. Provides step-by-step instruction on how to
               create a start page using the utility and notes that the
               process is fairly straightforward. Also points out that the
               style of the page, including the font and color, can be
               customized easily using HTML. Includes two screen displays
               and two sidebars.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Web Page Authoring; Shareware; Software
               Tools
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI10-215
       Author: Brown, Bruce
        Title: The written word -- Edit and enter data faster on PDAs with
               these three handwriting recognition utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (October 20, 1998) v17 n18 p52-53
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Advanced Recognition Technologies; ParaGraph, a division of
               Vandem; Communication Intelligence
 Product Name: ARTrecognition; Calligrapher 5.1; Jot Pro
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to handwriting recognition
               utilities designed to update a Palmtop PC's data entry
               capabilities. Covers ARTrecognition ($60) from Advanced
               Recognition Technologies of Chatsworth CA (888, 818);
               Calligrapher 5.1 ($50) from the ParaGraph division of Vandem
               of San Jose CA (888, 612); and Jot Pro ($29) from
               Communication Intelligence Corp. of Redwood Shores CA (800,
               650). States that all three products can be downloaded via
               the Web. Mentions ARTrecognition's ability to recognize
               English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese
               printed characters, and Calligrapher's ability to recognize
               printed characters and cursive writing, both separately and
               in combination. Points out Jot Pro's ability to decipher the
               Graffiti alphabet used with 3Com Palm devices. Includes one
               screen display.
Descriptor(s): Handwriting Recognition; Foreign Language; Hand-held
               Computer; Web Tools; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI09-260
       Author: Randall, Neil
        Title: Maintaining your Windows 98 system -- A set of very useful
               tools in Windows 98 will help you keep your system
               functioning at its peak
       Source: PC Magazine (September 22, 1998) v17 n16 p245-247
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Presents a discussion of the Windows 98 Maintenance Wizard
               and the System Configuration Utility. Says the primary
               function of the Maintenance Wizard is to keep the user
               organized to perform the tasks of checking the hard disk for
               errors, deleting unneeded files, and defragmenting the disk,
               by enabling automatic scheduling of the ScanDisk, Disk
               Cleanup, and Disk Defragmenter system utilities. Adds that
               each of these utilities is customizable. Notes that both the
               Maintenance Wizard and the System Configuration Utility
               provide a means to speed the system boot process by
               preventing programs in the StartUp folder from loading. Says
               the configuration utility offers a total of six tabs to
               control a different element of the start-up process.
               Concludes, ``System maintenance is never much fun, but it's
               necessary, and now we have very few excuses not to perform
               it.'' Includes three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Maintenance; Productivity Software; Operating Systems;
               Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI05-090
       Author: Knoblaugh, Rick
        Title: An antidote to aliases -- LFNDir displays long filenames
               under DOS, instead of cryptic aliases containing tildes
       Source: PC Magazine (May 5, 1998) v17 n9 p303-306
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Product Name: LFNDir
     Abstract: Describes LFNDir, a command line program that lets user view
               Windows 95 long filenames under DOS, and is available free
               for download from the PC Magazine Web site, or by mail.
               States that LFNDir's syntax and output closely match those
               of the DOS DIR command when DIR is executed from within a
               Windows 95 DOS box. Explains that LFNDir supports all DOS
               disk formats, but not the new FAT32 disk format introduced
               with Windows 95B. Notes that LFNDir improves upon DIR by
               allowing user to use wildcard characters in specifying
               pathnames, right up to the last path element. Attention is
               given to the FAT structure, wherein each disk has a fixed
               number of root-directory entries located in the sectors that
               immediately follow the FAT sectors. Considers
               subdirectories, and the layout of the long-filename
               directory entries. Explains how LFNDir determines which
               sectors are inhabited by the DOS file system structures.
               Includes two screen displa! ys, two illustrations, and one
               sidebar.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Directories; DOS; Windows; User Interface;
               Disk Files
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows; Microsoft Windows 95
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI05-022
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Stroke saver -- MJMSoft Design's KeyText automates your most
               frequent keyboard and mouse actions
       Source: PC Magazine (May 5, 1998) v17 n9 p76
    Pub. Type: Software Reviews
 Company Name: MJMSoft Design
 Product Name: KeyText 1.0
     Abstract: Presents a very favorable review of KeyText 1.0 ($25), a
               keyboard and mouse automation utility from MJMSoft Design
               Ltd. of Edinburgh, UK. Runs on IBM PC compatibles with 500K
               hard disk space and Windows 95 or NT 4.0 or later. Explains
               that KeyText performs the four basic tasks of entering text,
               scheduling programs, pushing dialog-box buttons, and
               gathering text from the clipboard. States that user can
               store the text of such repeatedly typed objects as their
               name and e-mail address, as KeyText ``items,'' and have the
               program enter it into an application when user selects the
               item from Keytext's menu. Features include the ability to
               enter the current date and time anywhere in an automated
               text string, and the ability to launch the browser and open
               any Web site assigned to the menu or a hotkey. Concludes
               that KeyText is the most powerful, elegant, flexible, and
               unobtrusive automation utility available for Windows 95 and
               NT. In! cludes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Keyboard Actuator; Keyboard; Text; User
               Interface; Input/Output; Mouse
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95; Microsoft Windows
               NT
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI05-006
       Author: Nash, Sharon Perenson, Melissa J
        Title: Utilities: E-mail extras
       Source: PC Magazine (May 5, 1998) v17 n9 p36
    Pub. Type: Software Reviews
 Company Name: Simplify Development; GFI Fax & Voice; CS2Exchange Software;
               Expert Software; Sierra Solutions
 Product Name: MailRoom for Windows 4.0; Emailrobot for Exchange/SMTP;
               CS2OutlookExpress; Animated E.Mail; MailRoom for Internet
               2.3
     Abstract: Presents favorable reviews of five e-mail utilities for IBM
               PC compatibles, including MailRoom for Windows 4.0 ($79 per
               user) from Simplify Development Corp. (603), Emailrobot for
               Exchange/SMTP ($495) from GFI Fax & Voice Ltd. (888), and
               Whew! ($9.95) from WordCruncher Publishing Technologies
               (801). Also reviews CS2OutlookExpress ($25) from CS2Exchange
               Software (540), and Animated E.Mail ($15) from Expert
               Software. States that MailRoom is a document imaging
               application that can deliver browsable documents to an
               e-mail inbox. Adds, Emailrobot automates and manages
               company's corporate and Web site e-mail. Notes Whew! is an e
               search utility and CS2OutlookExpress converts e-mail data
               from CompuServe 3.0 to Microsoft Outlook Express 4.0.
               Sidebar reviews MailRoom for Internet 2.3 ($55) from Sierra
               Solutions (310). Says it provides a simple, elegant design,
               and support for long file names. Includes four screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Electronic Mail; Utility Program; Web Tools; Search Engines;
               Conversions; Enterprise Computing
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows; Microsoft Windows 95
        Grade: B B B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI07-078
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Personalize your start menu with DecoMenu -- Now you can use
               a customized bitmap to decorate the Windows 95 or 98 start
               menu
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1998) v17 n13 p313-322
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Explains how to use freeware utility DecoMenu to supplant
               aspects of the standard Microsoft Windows start menu with a
               customized bitmap. Says DecoMenu supports Windows 95,
               Windows NT 4, Windows 98, and Windows NT 5, although the
               latter two operating systems are still in beta testing.
               Explains that it allows user to decorate the Start menu with
               their own bitmap, replacing the six or seven icons for the
               main section of the Start menu. Says user can put company
               logo or brand home computer with favorite sport, pet, or
               hobby. Points out that the software has an easy-to-use,
               wizard-style, question-based interface. Notes the software
               displays a preview of start menu changes before they are
               actually implemented. Describes each step in the process in
               detail, and provides extensive information on how the
               software works. Includes discussion of display speeds,
               extracting bitmaps and icon images, and other functions.
               Includes two screen! displays and one sidebar.
Descriptor(s): Icon; Shareware; Utility Program; Programming Aids
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI09-091
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Explorer Notes 2.0: make a note of it! -- An enhanced,
               Windows 98-compatible version lets you add descriptive notes
               to files displayed in Explorer
       Source: PC Magazine (September 1, 1998) v17 n15 p269-276
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Profiles the latest release of Explorer Notes 2.0, a utility
               program for the personal computer that enables the user to
               display notes on every file or folder in a system. Notes the
               previous version was only compatible with Windows 95 and was
               incompatible with Internet Explorer 4.0. Says while the 2.0
               does not display the notes directly in Windows Explorer, the
               user can view, add, or edit notes for a file or folder by
               right-clicking the context menu. Adds the program allows the
               user to review, edit, back up, and otherwise manage notes he
               or she has associated with the particular files. Notes if
               the user deletes, moves, or renames a folder in Windows
               Explorer, Notes will update the corresponding notes
               automatically. Adds the user can also use a file's
               associated note to locate a file on a hard disk. Includes
               two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Window Software; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI06-274
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Freely manage file associations -- Freedom of Association
               finds and fixes your Windows 95 file-association problems
       Source: PC Magazine (June 30, 1998) v17 n12 p271-274
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: PC Magazine Online
 Product Name: Freedom of Association
     Abstract: Provides a detailed discussion of the Freedom of Association
               (free) utility program, a 32-bit Windows application written
               in Delphi, and available as a download from PC Magazine
               Online. Says the program runs under Windows 95 and Windows
               NT 4.0. Gives a thumbnail explanation of Windows file
               associations, and provides step-by-step instructions on how
               to get started with the utility. Offers a highly-detailed
               guided tour of the utility, including finding and fixing
               problems, executing an undo, reading extensions, and writing
               registry files. Notes the utility enables the user to review
               all registered extensions, review the file types associated
               with those extensions, clean up invalid entries, correct
               invalid associations, and add extensions to existing file
               types. Includes three screen displays and one sidebar.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Utility Program; Problem-solving;
               Programming Aids
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI04-276
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Create and solve Word-letter puzzles
       Source: PC Magazine (April 21, 1998) v17 n8 p227-230
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Product Name: PC Ladder
     Abstract: Explains the utility program PC Ladder, which lets you
               create, solve, and print ``word ladder'' puzzles. States
               that to solve such a puzzle, the user transforms a starting
               word into an ending word (usually an opposite) by changing
               one letter at a time, using a real word at every step.
               States that the mathematician Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
               (better known as Lewis Carroll) is credited with inventing
               this word puzzle. Says PC Ladder will solve most puzzles in
               a few seconds, but occasionally will take a little longer.
               Requires Microsoft Windows 95, NT 4, and NT 3.51. Says the
               author hopes the techniques discussed here will inspire
               other software authors to think about how other users
               interface with programs. Includes two screen displays and a
               sidebar.
Descriptor(s): Puzzles; Games; Utility Program; Computer Instruction;
               Application Development; Word Games; Interface
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95; Microsoft Windows
               NT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI06-045
       Author: Wolking, Gregory A
        Title: Avoid the DOS prompt -- MultiRen lets you rename groups of
               files from within Windows Explorer
       Source: PC Magazine (June 9, 1998) v17 n11 p269-276
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Provides a profile of MultiRen, an program that enhances
               Windows Explorer with a sophisticated feature called
               Multiple Rename. Says it runs under Windows 95 or Windows NT
               4. Explains to access MultiRen, select two or more files
               from within Explorer, right-click for the context menu, and
               select Multi Rename. Adds MultiRen supports special commands
               that add sequence numbers to filenames, force uppercase or
               lowercase, and more. Explains how to use MultiRen, how to
               create a file list, rename files, sequence numbers and use
               templates. Offers a chart explaining MultiRen commands,
               including the functions of each. Concludes MultiRen is a
               simple but powerful program that demonstrates some useful
               Windows programming tricks. Contains one chart and one
               screen display.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Operating Environment; Software;
               Programming Language
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI08-076
       Author: Sipe, Steven E
        Title: Organize downloads with HandsDown -- Create lists of
               Internet files for downloading at your convenience in batch
               mode
       Source: PC Magazine (August 1, 1998) v17 n14 p347-354
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Presents a profile on HandsDown, a free-downloadable utility
               program made available by the magazine. Says HandsDown
               requires Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT 4.0 or
               better, and the Windows WinInet communication routines,
               which come with Windows. Explains that it lets it the user
               use the Windows Clipboard to create a list of files for
               download from FTP or Web servers, then download the files
               all at once and save the list as a project file for later
               use. Adds, a command line option lets user schedule
               downloads using Task Scheduler in Windows 98 or System
               Agent, available with the Windows 95 Plus! Pack. Concludes
               that if the users download files on a regular basis, they
               might appreciate the convenience that HandsDown offers.
               Includes four screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Operating Systems; Web Server
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI04-033
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Don't waste disk space -- Dupeless ferrets out duplicate
               files on your hard disk and helps you decide which ones to
               blow away
       Source: PC Magazine (April 7, 1998) v17 n7 p259-264
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: PC Magazine Online
 Product Name: Dupeless
     Abstract: PC TECH UTILITIES column introduces Dupeless, a 32-bit
               Delphi-based Windows application designed to find, and
               remove, duplicate files from a hard disk. Notes that this is
               a good utility to run once a month, to clean the hard disk
               and recover disk space. Claims that it works by comparing
               filenames and file sizes, and there is also an option to
               compare date and time stamps. Adds that it also allows the
               user to define exclusions, including specific folders or
               extensions. Explains how Dupeless was written in order to
               give it the ability to recognize several definitions of
               duplicates using an alternative to the typical MD5
               algorithm. Also, recommends that programmers overview the
               ShFileOperation API for a simple information function.
               Includes one screen display, one product source guide, and
               one program listing.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Utility Program; Windows; Programming Aids;
               Application Development; Tutorial; Algorithm
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI04-023
       Author: Plain, Stephen
        Title: Utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (April 7, 1998) v17 n7 p131, 134
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Presents a special report on Java-based utilities. Includes
               six products from six manufacturers. Points out that unlike
               traditional utility programs, Java utilities are not
               designed for specific operating systems or applications.
               Explains that Java utilities provide specific functions,
               rather than enhancing performance. Notes that Java utilities
               focus on content management. Suggests that Java is a natural
               choice for Internet and intranet applications. Mentions that
               they have benefited from the introduction of JavaBeans for
               the creation of third-party add-ons, such as spell-checkers.
               Includes three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Java; Utility Program; Application Development; Intranets;
               Internet; Add-on
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI04-022
       Author: Randall, Neil
        Title: Internet applications
       Source: PC Magazine (April 7, 1998) v17 n7 p120, 130
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to Java-based Internet applications
               as part of a special report on Java applications. Features
               the following products: Dart-Pro, a Java-based e-mail
               program from NetAccent Inc., of Downers Grove, IL (630);
               Novita LifeLetter, an e-mail client that offers the
               advantages of Java without compromises from Novita
               Communications Inc., Santa Clara, CA (408); Ding! which can
               be thought of as an office in/out board with the immediacy
               of the telephone and the reach of the Internet by Activerse
               Inc., of Austin, TX (800, 512); VolanoChat a full-featured
               chat package from Volano LLC, San Francisco, CA (415);
               MerzScope a Java-based In utility from MerzCom Inc., Laval,
               Quebec, Canada (510); and NetResults a server-based
               application that indexes any text-base files from Innotech
               Multimedia Corp. of North York, Ontario, Canada (416). Calls
               these applications full-featured. Includes three screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Internet; Java; Electronic Mail; Messaging; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI04-019
       Author: Coffee, Peter
        Title: Java applications -- Although Java has received much
               attention, until recently it has been slow to find its way
               into mainstream applications
       Source: PC Magazine (April 7, 1998) v17 n7 p107-134
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to Java applications. Features
               guides to products in four categories: productivity
               applications (seven products from seven manufacturers),
               financial applications (two products from two
               manufacturers), Internet applications (six products from six
               manufacturers), and utilities (six products from six
               manufacturers). Notes that the number of Java-based
               off-the-shelf applications is slowly increasing, and claims
               that the quality of these applications is improving. Reports
               mixed resul testing, with the Java applications proving to
               be efficient. However, their installation was frustrating
               and difficult. Argues that generally the Java applications
               do not offer the level of performance of their Windows
               counterparts. However, points out they have the advantages
               of portability, platform independence, lower cost. Includes
               one diagram, one sidebar, and eleven screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Java; Application Development; Productivity Software;
               Financial Planning; Internet; Utility Program; Benchmark
               Testing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-267
       Author: Wolking, Gregory A
        Title: Read on-screen documents with ease -- Scroller lets you
               scroll windows automatically at the speed of your choice
       Source: PC Magazine (March 24, 1998) v17 n6 p259-266
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Presents a description of Scroller, a utility program for
               reading long documents on-screen. Without this program,
               users read a screen of text, stop reading, aim the mouse,
               click the scroll bar, relocate their place in the document,
               and start reading again. This program scrolls the window,
               line by line, at a rate specified by the user. This 32-bit
               applications runs under Windows 95 and NT 4.0. Describes how
               to install the application, its impact on external files,
               and how to uninstall it if desired. Describes the steps the
               author took in identifying tasks the program had to
               accomplish and the programming techniques used to accomplish
               them. Includes instructions on how to obtain Scroller online
               or by mail and tips on how to use it once it is installed.
               Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Software Tools; Utility Program; Tutorial; Programming
               Instruction; Reading
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-257
       Author: Proffit, Brian Stone, M David
        Title: Do tasks in other OSs -- Windows 95 is the leader on
               desktops, but there will always be other OSs. Here are some
               utilities for them
       Source: PC Magazine (March 24, 1998) v17 n6 p221-224
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents capsule reviews of utility programs for OSs other
               than Windows 95. No "Editors' Choice" was named for any
               category in any OS. Programs for OS/2 include three
               antivirus programs, six backup programs, four desktop
               managers, four disk managers, four interface programs, and
               eight system utilities. For Windows NT there are four
               antivirus programs, five backup programs, three disk
               managers, four interface programs, and two system programs.
               For Windows 3.x and DOS there are 10 utilities but are not
               grouped by category. Includes one illustration and four
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Operating Systems; Utility Program; OS/2; Software Review;
               DOS; Backup
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-256
       Author: Beizer, Doug Anderson, Jennifer Mendelson, Edward Canter,
               Sheryl
        Title: Complete your Net toolbox -- Here we've pulled together a
               few more tools to help you make more productive use of your
               time online
       Source: PC Magazine (March 24, 1998) v17 n6 p213-219
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Product Name: BulletProof FTP 1.03; CheckMail 32 1.50
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide, in tabular form, to a number of
               miscellaneous Internet utilities, including three floating
               toolbars, two Web outliners, a bookmark synchronizer, two
               Web graphics managers, 16 e-mail notifiers, 16 FTP
               utilities, and browser utilities in five categories.
               "Editors' Choice" honors went to CheckMail 32 1.50 ($12) in
               the e-mail notifier category and BulletProof FTP 1.03
               ($29.95) in the FTP utilities category. No other "Editors'
               Choices" were announced. Includes one illustration, two
               tables, and six screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Internet; Web Tools; Software Review; Utility Program
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-246
       Author: Morris, John Giles, Douglas Haskin, David Schneider, Michael
               L
        Title: Take care of other tasks -- From compressing files to
               enhancing printer output, this assortment of utilities will
               help you get the most out of your PC
       Source: PC Magazine (March 24, 1998) v17 n6 p163-174
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: PKWare
 Product Name: PKZip 2.60 for Windows
     Abstract: Presents reviews of miscellaneous utilities for Windows 95.
               Includes reviews of seven file compressions utilities, seven
               disk utilities, six data security utilities, three
               surveillance utilities, two multiboot utilities, two display
               utilities, three sound and storage utilities, and two
               printer utilities. Most of the reviews are very brief, and
               only one category - file compression - had an "Editors'
               Choice." The winner in that category was PKZip 2.60 for
               Windows ($49) from PKWare Inc., (414). This version of the
               program has an improved graphical interface. It is available
               in both 16- and 32-bit versions and zipping and unzipping
               can be done either with the aid of a Wizard or using a
               standard interface. The program is noteworthy for its
               interface and speed. It can read and extract BinHex, GZIP,
               MIME, TAR, uuencoded, and xxencoded files. It can also
               search for and sort files by name, size, and date. Includes
               one ill! ustration and 14 screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Compression; Wizards; Encryption; Sound; Printer; Utility
               Program; Software Review
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-244
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: View files faster -- These handy tools extend Windows Quick
               View and let you have a quick look at just about any type of
               file without installing the software
       Source: PC Magazine (March 24, 1998) v17 n6 p157-161
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Inso
 Product Name: Quick View Plus 4.5
     Abstract: Presents reviews of five file viewer programs which allow
               viewing files without the requirement of launching the
               application that generated them. These programs also include
               some management features and all but one - which is
               specialized for CAD viewing - are priced below $60. Viewing
               a file requires only right-clicking on a filename in
               Explorer and selecting the viewer from a menu or opening a
               file from the viewer's dialog box. Most word processing or
               spreadsheet files appear with formatting intact and graphics
               files can be zoomed in and out. Users can also view files in
               text or hex mode. Includes a buyers' guide comparing
               features of the programs reviewed. Quick View Plus 4.5 ($50)
               from Inso Corp., Boston, MA (800, 617) is the "Editors'
               Choice." Includes one illustration, one table, and five
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Software Review; Utility Program; Document
               Viewer; Computer Aided Design
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible; 486-based PC
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-242
       Author: Stone, M David
        Title: Back up your work -- There's no excuse for not protecting
               your valuable data. These utilities make backing up your
               work as easy as 1, 2, 3
       Source: PC Magazine (March 24, 1998) v17 n6 p149-152
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Seagate Software
 Product Name: Backup Exec for Windows 95
     Abstract: Presents reviews of four backup programs for Windows 95.
               Although Windows 95 includes two backup packages--XCOPY and
               Microsoft Backup - Microsoft Backup can restore files only
               to the drive and directory they came from and does not offer
               the capability of disaster recovery, and XCOPY requires a
               level of comfort with the DOS command line that not everyone
               has. Two of the programs reviewed allow users to treat a
               tape drive as a disk drive, so files can be read from tape
               using any program that can normally read from a disk. A
               sidebar presents a brief description of four online backup
               services which can store backup files on the Net and another
               sidebar describes Safety Net Pro ($21.95) a minimalist
               backup program that saves only essential files including the
               Windows registry and all .INI files. Backup Exec for Windows
               95 ($99) from Seagate Software Inc., Heathrow, FL (800, 407)
               is the "Editors' Choice." Includes one il! lustration and
               five screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Software Review; Utility Program
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows 95; IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-237
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Clean up your hard disk -- Too many downloads? One of these
               uninstaller utilities will safely rid your system of
               unwanted files and old applications
       Source: PC Magazine (March 24, 1998) v17 n6 p139-146
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Quarterdeck
 Product Name: CleanSweep Deluxe
     Abstract: Presents reviews of six uninstaller programs which can clean
               up a system more completely than Windows 95's Add/Remove
               Programs applet. These programs scan a hard disk to create a
               complete database of files including a library of links and
               dependencies which tell them which DLLs and other files are
               required to run specific apps - a feature lacking in
               Add/Remove. When an app is installed, an uninstaller records
               the names of files added or changed and data modified in the
               registry and INI files so when the app is removed or
               archived, the program deletes only those files that were
               added or changed. An insert presents four reasons why one
               needs an uninstaller. Includes a buyers' guide comparing
               features of programs reviewed and a benchmark test.
               CleanSweep Deluxe ($60) from Quarterdeck Corp., Marina del
               Rey, CA (800, 573) is the "Editors' Choice." Includes one
               illustration, two tables, and four screen displays.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Utility Program; Software Review
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible; 486-based PC
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-236
       Author: Simon, Barry
        Title: Solve PC problems -- Here's an array of tools and suites to
               help you fix what's ailing your PC or let you fine-tune your
               system for better performance
       Source: PC Magazine (March 24, 1998) v17 n6 p125-137
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: CyberMedia; Network Associates
 Product Name: First Aid 98; Nuts & Bolts
     Abstract: Presents reviews of seven troubleshooting utility programs
               and suites. Traditionally, such programs concentrated on
               hardware, reporting a diagnosing IRQ and DMA problems, but
               with plug-and-play they have shifted the emphasis to
               software troubleshooting. These programs address problems of
               unwanted files left by old programs, shared files getting
               lost, disk fragmentation, and others. A sidebar describes
               three Internet programs that deliver software updates and
               another sidebar describes crash protection features included
               in five of the products reviewed. Includes a buyers' guide
               comparing features of the programs reviewed. An insert gives
               five reasons why one needs a troubleshooting program.
               FirstAid 98 ($40) from CyberMedia Inc., Santa Monica, CA
               (800, 310) and Nuts & Bolts ($50) from Network Associates
               Inc., Santa Clara, CA (800, 408) ar "Editors' Choice" for
               beginners and power users, respectively. Includes one il!
               lustration, nine screen displays, and two table
Descriptor(s): Troubleshooting; Utility Program; Software Review
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible; 486-based PC
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-234
       Author: Morris, John Brown, Bruce Canter, Sheryl Mendelson, Edward
        Title: The 1998 utility guide -- For our annual roundup of desktop
               utilities, we tested 225 products to find the best tools to
               help you get the most out of your PC
       Source: PC Magazine (March 24, 1998) v17 n6 p100-224
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents PC Magazine's annual roundup of the best of PC
               utilities, based on tests of 225 products "from antivirus to
               Zip." Says the essential toolkit will have an antivirus
               program, a troubleshooting program, an uninstaller, a backup
               program, and a file compression program (and recommends
               eight optional goodies). Lists the utility features already
               in Windows based on beta versions of Windows 98 and NT 5.0
               Workstation. Includes a directory of programs tested.
               "Editors' Choice" honors are given in most categories.
               Program categories are: troubleshooting; antivirus;
               uninstallers; personal backup; file viewers; file
               compression; hard disk utilities; data security; multiboot
               utilities; other hardware utilities; Internet security
               suites, parental filtering, search and navigation, FTP
               utilities, and other utilities; and DOS, Windows 3.1, and
               OS/2 utilities. Includes 27 illustrations, 111 screen
               displays, 11 tab! les, and one graph.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Backup; Internet; Security;
               Troubleshooting; Diagnostics; Software Review
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI01-235
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: Changer2 livens up your desktop -- Automate changes to your
               screen saver, wallpaper, pointers, and desktop theme
       Source: PC Magazine (January 20, 1998) v17 n2 p243-248
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Provides a profile on Changer2 ($NA), a Windows 95 utility
               available for download from the PC Magazine Online site.
               Claims that Changer2 automates changes to the desktop,
               giving the desktop a different look every time the utility
               is run. Explains that it allows the user to specify changes
               to the wallpaper, pointer, screen saver, and desktop theme,
               giving it a choice to select from for the changes. Overviews
               installation and setup of the utility, including how to set
               the parameters via item selection. Also discusses how the
               setup works, with an explanation of how the source code
               works. Points out that this version is an update of a
               Windows 3.1, and notes the differences in the program.
               Includes one screen display and one product summary.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Screen Savers; Window Software; Task
               Automation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI01-217
       Author: Morris, John Stone, M David
        Title: Second looks
       Source: PC Magazine (January 20, 1998) v17 n2 p80
    Pub. Type: Hardware Review
 Company Name: Verity; SyQuest
 Product Name: Verity KEYview Pro; SyQuest SyJet
     Abstract: Presents a second look of two products previously reviewed
               by PC Magazine, and notes changes and/or their real-world
               performance. Includes the KEYview Pro ($49; $29, upgrade), a
               file viewer originally from FTP Software and now available
               from Verity Inc. Notes that it has been upgraded to 6.0 to
               address stability problems, and adds new features such as a
               hex viewer and support for the latest office suite file
               formats. Also spotlights the SyJe ($399), a 1.5GB removable
               disk drive from SyQuest. Reports that after several months
               of day-to-day use, it is still a relia impressive product.
               Adds that it is definitely one of the top performing
               removable drives, and notes that the company is working on a
               utility that will allow the drive to be recognized by
               Windows 95 and Windows NT as a fixed disk. Includes one
               photo.
Descriptor(s): Disk Drive; File Management; Document Viewer; Removable;
               Upgrade; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-092
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Screens: a screen-saver manager -- Schedule screen savers
               for holidays, special events, and days of the week
       Source: PC Magazine (March 10, 1998) v17 n5 p259-268
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Introduces Screens, a utility program which can be used to
               schedule screen savers by day of the week or special dates.
               This is a 32-bit program that runs under Windows 95 or NT
               3.51 or higher. It can be obtained by downloading or by
               mail. Includes instructions on how to use the program
               overall as well as specific instructions on how to program
               it to display a particular screen saver on a special day.
               When the program does not find a special-event screen it
               uses the default screen saver defined on the "Default" tab.
               The program makes a list of available screen savers by
               examining all files in the Windows directory and System
               directory for files with the extension .SCR. Includes a
               brief description of how the program determines whether a
               given day is special or not and describes calculated dates
               and also describes some of the API functions used to store
               and manipulate screen savers. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Screen Savers; Utility Program; Programming Design; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-084
       Author: Sipe, Steven E
        Title: Installation toolkits -- We look at five packages that give
               developers a quicker way to produce professional-looking
               installation programs
       Source: PC Magazine (March 10, 1998) v17 n5 p239-244
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: InstallShield Software
 Product Name: InstallShield Express 2; InstallShield Professional 5
     Abstract: Presents reviews of five installation programs.
               Historically, most programs came with custom installation
               programs which required many lines of Visual Basic or C
               code. These programs were built for a specific installation
               and in many cases had to be rewritten for each new product
               and sometimes for each version of the same product. The
               programs reviewed here handle many of the common tasks such
               as checking for disk space and checking for write permission
               on target drives and also include an uninstall feature. Each
               of the products reviewed has strengths and weaknesses but
               all provide a core set of features required for building a
               professional-quality installer. A table summarizes the
               features of each of the programs reviewed. InstallShield
               Express 2 ($245) and InstallShield Professional 5 ($795)
               from InstallShield Software Corp., Schaumburg, IL (800) are
               the basic and advanced "Editors Choice" selections,
               respective! ly. Includes one illustration, one table, and
               six screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Programming Aids; Utility Program; Software Review
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI03-010
       Author: Beizer, Doug
        Title: Return to sender
       Source: PC Magazine (March 10, 1998) v17 n5 p40
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: America Online; Omron Advanced Systems
 Product Name: Mail Controls; MailJail
     Abstract: Announces two e-mail utility programs for filtering out
               unwanted junk e-mail. Mail Controls (free) from America
               Online (800) lets AOL subscribers set mail acceptance levels
               to receive e-mail from AOL members only, members plus
               specified domains or addresses, or all sources. MailJail
               ($24.95 download, $29.95 on CD) from Omron Advanced Systems
               (408) has a knowledge base of more than 400 rules with new
               filtering rules added monthly using MailJail's online
               service. It can check whether a message comes from a
               frequent correspondent or a known spammer, in which case it
               is blocked. The program learns the user's e-mail preferences
               before identifying and filtering unwanted mail. It checks
               the entire content of each message to ensure that no junk
               mail slips through. Includes two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Electronic Mail; Filtering; Utility Program; Spamming
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI02-279
       Author: Sipe, Steven E
        Title: Download Web sites -- Avoid waiting for individual Web pages
               to load: SiteSnagger downloads entire Web sites
       Source: PC Magazine (February 24, 1998) v17 n4 p229-232
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Presents SiteSnagger, a utility program for downloading Web
               sites. The downloaded sites are displayed in a tree display
               with a Table of Contents, and are available for browsing
               offline. SiteSnagger can be configured by specifying the
               number of levels to download, the number of pages to
               download (which overrides the number of levels when it is
               reached), and limiting links to other servers. The program
               generates a log of every file it downloads and of the level
               of each item. It is a resource-intensive utility - for large
               sites it will require as much as 2MB free memory and or
               course hard disk requirements can also be heavy. Provides a
               brief description of the inner workings of SiteSnagger,
               tells how the program extracts HTML tags, and how it
               navigates links. Provides information on how to obtain the
               files for this and other programs in the PC Tech articles
               from the Net or by mail or fax.
Descriptor(s): Web Sites; Utility Program; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI02-081
       Author: Deurbrouck, John
        Title: The ins and the outs -- InOutBd lets every employee in your
               company keep track of who's in and who's out
       Source: PC Magazine (February 10, 1998) v17 n3 p257-262
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Presents a utility program, InOutBd, a small Web server
               which can be used to keep track of which employees are in or
               out of the office. Anyone with a PC and a TCP/IP network can
               use this program to maintain a personal in/out board. The
               program is available for download from PC Magazine or by
               mail and the source code is also available. Describes how to
               set up the program and how to use it once it is operational.
               Provides instructions on how to customize its display and
               presents a brief discussion of the security aspects of the
               program which, although it can connect to outside computers,
               makes only very limited information available. Concludes
               with a brief discussion of methods of handling HTTP with
               Microsoft Foundation Classes. Some Web servers will require
               more complex status boards, but for simple requests with
               simple responses, InOutBd will be useful. Includes five
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Web Server; TCP/IP; Utility Program; Tutorial; Window
               Software; Human Resources
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI02-073
       Author: Buehler, Steve
        Title: Bits and pieces
       Source: PC Magazine (February 10, 1998) v17 n3 p226
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: Executive Software; Raxco
 Product Name: Diskeeper; PerfectDisk NT
     Abstract: MULTIPLE ACCESS column discusses defragmentation tools.
               Historically servers had no defragging tools - to recover
               lost disk space one unloaded the entire file system to tape
               and reloaded it. Microsoft has incorporated defragmentation
               in the Windows Plus! pack but much of corporate America has
               avoided Windows 95. Two companies have recently introduced
               defragmenters. Executive Software has introduced Diskeeper
               in versions for NT Server and NT Workstation. A Lite version
               will be bundled with Windows NT 5.0. Raxco has introduced
               PerfectDisk NT which also does standard defragmentation but
               also has an optimization feature which watches how the user
               works and which files are accessed most often. It moves
               these files near to Windows NT's Master File Table to
               minimize head-disk movement. Defragging is not a necessity
               but it does guarantee that the hard disk throughput will not
               slow down over time.
Descriptor(s): Hard Disk Drive; File Management; Utility Program; Product
               Announcement
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI02-011
       Author: Beizer, Doug
        Title: Better your browser
       Source: PC Magazine (February 10, 1998) v17 n3 p40
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Ethos Software; Primenet; Webcom
 Product Name: Ethosware 2.5; NetLaunch 3.13a; Auto WinNet95 4.1
     Abstract: Announces three new browser utilities. Ethosware 2.5
               ($24.95) from Ethos Software Corp. (617) allows users to cut
               and paste the addresses of files desired for download. It
               connects to the Net, downloads the files at the scheduled
               times, and then closes the connection. It offers diagnostic
               and repair tools to correct errors due to protocol, modem,
               dialing, and Internet connections. NetLaunch 3.13a from
               Primenet can launch or close e-mail, browse and news
               services when the user connects or disconnects from th Net.
               Programs can be added by dragging their shortcuts into the
               launch-list window. AutoWinNet95 4.1 ($29.95) from Webcom
               (800) can automate dial-up, file transfers, Web navigation,
               and e-mail according to a preset schedule. It supports an
               unlimited number of mailboxes and supports advanced
               formatting. Includes two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Web Browsers; Utility Program; Scheduling; Electronic Mail
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI02-007
       Author: Nash, Sharon
        Title: Software shopping online
       Source: PC Magazine (February 10, 1998) v17 n3 p36
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Product Name: Chumbo.com; BuyDirect.com
     Abstract: Presents a listing of Web sites which sell software through
               third-party outlets or direct purchase from a vendor, or
               allow users to sample a product through shareware or a demo.
               Chumbo.com provides a large list of software titles at
               reasonable prices and also includes products reviews and
               news from Ziff-Davis publications. BuyDirect.com sells
               software directly from developers over the Net. Most of
               these are Web enhancement programs which can be downloaded
               immediately after purchase. Payment is made via Secure
               Internet transactions. Also provides a list of additional
               sites which focus on programs in mutually exclusive formats
               or concentrate on shareware and demo versions of popular
               software. Most of them can be found by a search for
               "shareware" on the Web. Includes two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Web Sites; Electronic Commerce; Shareware; Software; Utility
               Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI01-077
       Author: Wolking, Gregory A
        Title: Share your bookmarks between browsers -- Synchronize your
               Internet Explorer and Navigator bookmarks with SyncURLs
       Source: PC Magazine (January 6, 1998) v17 n1 p253-259
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Describes SyncURLs, a utility program which can be used to
               synchronize bookmarks between Internet Explorer and
               Navigator. The program is a 32-bit application that runs
               under Windows 95 or NT 4.0. It imports bookmarks from both
               browser libraries into a single bookmark library where they
               can be rearranged and exported back out to either or both
               browsers. Describes how to install the program and how to
               run it. Provides guidelines for organizing bookmarks and
               managing bookmark libraries. Includes a brief discussion of
               the inner workings of SyncURLs which was written in Visual
               C++ 5.0. Also provides guidelines for working with the
               TreeView common control, a common control introduced with
               Windows 95. This program was not difficult to write, but the
               task it performs will be welcome to many people who use more
               than one browser. Includes one table and one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Web Browsers; Utility Program; 32-Bit Code
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI01-012
       Author: Anderson, Jennifer L
        Title: Faster! Faster! Faster!
       Source: PC Magazine (January 6, 1998) v17 n1 p40
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Kiss Software; GOTO Software
 Product Name: Speed Surfer; WebEarly
     Abstract: Announces two new browser accelerators. Speed Surfer
               ($29.95) from Kiss Software Corp. (888) works with any
               browser higher than Netscape Navigator 2.0 or Microsoft
               Internet Explorer 3.0. Its Intelligent Agent keeps track of
               the kind of surfing the user does (so it should get better
               at its job) and it stores the sites visited in a Smartcache.
               The program keeps track of the top-ten most visited sites
               which are prefetched. WebEarly ($24.95) from GOTO Software
               (33) preloads pages that are linked to the one the user is
               visiting. It can be customized to load a set number of
               next-level pages, to search for specific file types, or to
               omit advertisements. Both programs anticipate which page the
               user is going to visit next and loads it in the background
               so when a link is clicked the new page appears instantly.
               Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Web Browsers; Accelerator; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 98PI01-008
       Author: Kolouthros, Yvonne
        Title: No more stamps?
       Source: PC Magazine (January 6, 1998) v17 n1 p36
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Pitney Bowes; Saranac Software
 Product Name: Pitney Bowes Personal Post Office for the PC; Saranac
               PostagePlus
     Abstract: Announces two computer-based mail meter systems due to ship
               the second half of 1998. The Personal Post Office for the PC
               ($NA) from Pitney Bowes (800) allows users to download
               postage from the Net or from a direct network connection to
               Pitney Bowes' secure Postage by Phone system. The postage
               can be printed on labels or envelopes using a laser or
               bubble-jet printer. It supports multiple address books and
               can import and export PC lists that are ODBC-compliant.
               PostagePlus ($30 plus $5 to $10 plus postage) from Saranac
               Software (315) can print onto labels or envelopes using any
               300-dpi printer. It supports mail-merge address lists from
               Symantec's ACT! and Microsoft Access. It includes mail
               tracking and provides a two-way authentication system for
               secure transactions. Both programs are awaiting USPS
               approval. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Internet; Federal Government; Utility Program; Security
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI11-077
       Author: Wolking, Gregory
        Title: RoboType means less typing for you -- You can add text macro
               expansion to almost any application running under Windows 95
       Source: PC Magazine (November 4, 1997) v16 n19 p327-340
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: PC Magazine Online
 Product Name: RoboType
     Abstract: PC TECH UTILITIES column provides an overview of RoboType, a
               32-bit C++ utility, designed to allow users to type
               abbreviations in place of long, frequently-used text.
               Overviews how the utility works, and how to set up
               abbreviation libraries. Explains how RoboType was designed,
               using Microsoft Visual C++ 5.0, and how modifications can be
               made to the code in order to give it self-resizing windows.
               Also, complains that the RoboType help button does not work,
               and explains how to fix this problem by manipulating the
               OnHelpHitText handler. Mentions how to set up individual
               message queues and how to define the handling of multiple
               instances. Includes one screen display, one program listing,
               and one product source guide.
Descriptor(s): Task Automation; Utility Program; Library; C Programming
               Language
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95; Microsoft Windows
               NT; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI11-011
       Author: Anderson, Jennifer L
        Title: The human connection
       Source: PC Magazine (November 4, 1997) v16 n19 p40
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Activerse; PeopleLink; Claudin Lambert
 Product Name: Ding!; PeopleLink; PeerChat
     Abstract: Announces the release of three instant-messaging
               applications for online communication. Explains that these
               applications allow users to locate other users online, let
               other users know that you are online, send immediate
               messages, or conduct chat sessions. Includes: Ding! ($NA)
               from Activerse (512), a message alerting and re-routing
               tool; PeopleLink ($NA) from PeopleLink (310), a desktop
               user-location and messaging utility; and PeerChat ($8), a
               shareware chat application from Claudin Lambert. Includes
               four screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Messaging; Web Tools; Data Communication; Computer
               Conferencing; Electronic Mail; Utility Program; Shareware
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI10-231
       Author: Freed, Les
        Title: Cardinal Connecta Internal 56K Data/Fax Modem
       Source: PC Magazine (October 21, 1997) v16 n18 p105, 108
    Pub. Type: Hardware Review
 Company Name: Cardinal Technologies
 Product Name: Cardinal Connecta Internal 56K Data/Fax Modem
     Abstract: Presents a mixed review of the Connecta Internal 56K
               Data/Fax Modem ($150, street; trade-up program available), a
               56Kbps x2 modem from Cardinal Technologies Inc. of Atlanta,
               GA (770). Says that it is easy to install, and reports that
               Cardinal plans to offer a free unconditional upgrade once
               the ITU standard is set. Software includes Eudora Lite
               e-mail, FaxTalk Plus, Windows drivers, and trial versions of
               several utilities including an antivirus title. Notes that
               this device is nearly identical to the Sportster 56K
               Faxmodem from 3Com, one of the top rated in this evaluation,
               but that its performance is a bit lower and its software
               bundle is not as full-featured. Criticizes the lack of a Web
               browser in its software bundle. Concludes that this is a
               good performer at an impressive price.
Descriptor(s): Modem; Speed; Standards; Data Transmission; Facsimile;
               Utility Program; Upgrade
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: C
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI12-021
       Author: Simon, Barry
        Title: Managing your .ZIPs -- Five utilities let you manipulate
               your .ZIP files with ease.
       Source: PC Magazine (December 2, 1997) v16 n21 p62-63
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Canyon Software; Software Builders; PKWare; Pacific Gold
               Coast; Mijenix
 Product Name: Drag and Zip; NetZIP for Windows with NetZIP Plug-In; PKZip;
               TurboZIP; ZipMagic
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to five utility programs for
               managing .ZIP files. All five can make self-extracting
               .ZIPs. The programs reviewed are Drag and Zip version 2.21
               ($30) from Canyon Software of San Rafael, CA (800, 415);
               NetZIP for Windows with NetZIP Plug-In version 4.0 ($29.99)
               from Software Builders of Atlanta, GA (800, 770); PKZip 2.50
               for Windows ($49) from PKWare of Brown Deer, WI (414);
               TurboZiP version 2.1 ($39) from Pacific Gold Coast Corp. of
               Glen Cove, NY (800, 516), and ZipMagic ($39.95) from Mijenix
               Corp. of Madison, WI (800, 617). Although all five of these
               programs can perform basic unzipping, the reviewer feels
               that NetZIP and PKZip need to improve their interfaces.
               Power users will be attracted to ZipMagic's integration of
               .ZIP files into the file system and its archive manager is
               unique among the five in its ability to view all eight
               graphics files and manage multiple .ZIPs. Includes five
               screen displa! ys.
Descriptor(s): Compression; Software Review; Utility Program; Interface;
               File Management
        Grade: B B B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI11-229
       Author: Seymour, Jim
        Title: Tips for...umm...your friends -- It's satisfying to help
               someone with a task they find baffling
       Source: PC Magazine (November 18, 1997) v16 n20 p93-94
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: The JIM SEYMOUR column discusses the author's unofficial
               role as the so-called Designated Technical Support Provider
               for his friends and family. Claims that the ability to help
               those who have computer-related problems is satisfying.
               Lists ten tips that he regularly shares with these
               individuals, which include: keeping program and data files
               separate; using a lot of directories for organizing data
               files; using the Windows 95 long filenames; usi utility more
               powerful that Windows' built-in file finder; regul checking
               company Web sites for new video and printer drivers;
               removing any unused programs and fonts; performing regular
               scan a defrag routines; checking company Web sites for any
               software upgrades or add-ons; and keeping an up-to-date
               emergency backup disk. Includes one photo.
Descriptor(s): Troubleshooting; Customer Support; File Management; Utility
               Program; Tutorial; Backup
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI11-212
       Author: Daly, Robert
        Title: Inoculating your network
       Source: PC Magazine (November 18, 1997) v16 n20 p42
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: IBM Corp.; Intel Corp.; TouchStone Software
 Product Name: IBM AntiVirus 3.0 Enterprise Edition for Networks; LANDesk
               Virus Protect 5.0; PC-cillin Corporate Edition 2.2
     Abstract: Introduces three recently-released antivirus solutions for
               the network from three manufacturers. Presents IBM AntiVirus
               3.0 Enterprise Edition for Networks ($620 for 25 user
               license), a multilingual solution for global networks from
               IBM (800). Notes that it provides remote distribution,
               configuration, and administration from a central NetWare
               server. Also reports on LANDesk Virus Protect 5.0 ($1,495)
               from Intel Corp. (800), which has added a centralized
               management console for installation and administration, and
               PC-cillin Corporate Edition 2.2 ($995 for 50 users) from
               TouchStone Software Corp. (800), which offers simple
               administration, distribution, and updating functions with
               customizable protection levels. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Network Management; Utility Program; Security;
               Networks; Software Distribution
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95; Microsoft Windows
               NT; OS/2; NetWare
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI12-229
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Fill in the blanks
       Source: PC Magazine (December 16, 1997) v16 n22 p80
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: Microsoft; Adobe Systems; Symantec
 Product Name: Microsoft Internet Explorer; Adobe PhotoDeluxe; Norton
               Utilities for Windows 95
     Abstract: Reports that Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 is incompatible
               with some features of Adobe PhotoDeluxe 2.0 and Symantec's
               Norton Utilities for Windows 95 2.0. Some screens in these
               programs appear blank when they are run after IE 4.0 is
               installed on a PC. Both of these programs use IE 3.0 within
               their application windows to display some browser content,
               but Microsoft says that the new problem is due to the fact
               that certain HTML tags act differently with the new browser.
               Adobe and Symantec planned to have patches available on
               their Web site by press time. IE 4.0 includes a READ.ME file
               which lists a number of incompatibilities, but these two are
               not among them. Article lists several specific instances of
               how these incompatibilities affect the operation of the two
               programs. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Web Browsers; Image Processing; Utility Program
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI12-270
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Put the squeeze on compound files -- Unfrag eliminates dead
               spaces in compound files and frees disk space in the process
       Source: PC Magazine (December 22, 1997) v16 n22 p275-280
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Presents a description of Unfrag, a utility program which
               can defragment compound files and restore wasted hard disk
               space. The program works with Windows 95 and NT 4.0 or
               higher and is available online or by mail. Compound files
               are created by applications such as Word, Excel, and others
               that support OLE. When these files are fragmented
               internally, they waste disk space. Includes a definition of
               compound files. Provides instructions for installing and
               running Unfrag, noting that it is an .exe file which makes
               no changes to the Window's registry. Uninstalling it is a
               simple matter of deleting Unfrag.exe. Includes some details
               about the utility program itself as well as some bits of
               code used in the program. Also describes how the custom
               bitmap display in the left half of the program's main window
               gets its colors. Running this utility may free up a few
               megabytes of hard disk space. Includes two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Utility Program; Tutorial; Disk Files
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI09-035
       Author: Perenson, Melissa J
        Title: Get the word out
       Source: PC Magazine (September 9, 1997) v16 n15 p81
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Microsoft; Inso
 Product Name: Microsoft Word 6.0/95 Binary Converter for Word 97;
               Microsoft Word 97 Document Converter; Microsoft Word Viewer
               97; Quick View Plus 5.0 for Windows 97
     Abstract: Announces a new converter which bridges the file-format gap
               between Microsoft Word 97 and Word 95. Many Word 97 users
               who tried to save files as Word 95 files found that they
               were saved in RTC format rather than as .DOC files. The Word
               6.0/95 Binary Converter for Word 97 is available as a free
               download from Microsoft's Web site. It saves Word documents
               as binary files with a .DOC extension. When the download is
               installed, it replaces the Word 6.0/95 converter that
               originally shipped with Word 97. A Word 97 Document
               Converter is also available, which allows users to view a
               Word 97 document in Word for Windows 6.0 or Word 7.0 for
               Windows 95. Inso, the publisher of Quick View Plus 4.0 for
               Windows 95, NT 4.0, and 3.1 offers an update that supports
               Word 97 and Excel 97. These viewers can be downloaded from
               Inso's Web site but they work only with Quick View Plus 4.0
               ($60). Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Word Processing; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI09-015
       Author: Levy, Josh
        Title: Priority packaging
       Source: PC Magazine (September 9, 1997) v16 n15 p40
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: e-parcel
 Product Name: SmartLoad
     Abstract: Announces SmartLoad (server software $299 for five
               simultaneous connections, $15,000 for unlimited connections,
               client software free), an Internet utility to expedite
               downloads from e-parcel (888). The program maximizes the
               bandwidth available on a Net connection and monitors the
               user's CPU activity. It can download invisibly, and if a
               download is interrupted, it notes where it left off and
               resumes from that point later. Its protocol is compatible
               with nearly every format including antivirus, e-commerce,
               encrypted, and compressed documents. Includes one
               illustration.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Internet; Electronic Commerce; Compression
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI09-013
       Author: Muchmore, Michael W
        Title: Just the pix, please
       Source: PC Magazine (September 9, 1997) v16 n15 p40
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: S&H Computer Systems; Scott M. Baker; NetWork, The
 Product Name: NewsRover; NewsRobot; Pluckit!
     Abstract: Announces three new utilities for finding binary image files
               on the Internet and aid in downloading them. NewsRover
               ($29.95) from S&H Computer Systems (615) works under Windows
               95 and NT. It can be scheduled to download binaries and can
               do both MIME and unencoding. It can filter out spam and
               support the user of search terms. NewsRobot ($15) from Scott
               M. Baker is available in 16- and 32-bit versions. It
               displays images as it downloads them. It includes an
               image-catalog generator, slide-show viewer, and duplicate
               detection. Pluckit! ($24.95 for 16-bit, $29.95 for 32-bit)
               from The NetWork (817) also displays images as they arrive.
               It can transfer files to a Favorites area and view them with
               a zoom feature. It does not offer text-reading and search
               capability but can exclude messages containing specified
               terms. It can also block messages coming from a specific
               e-mail address. Includes two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Internet; Shareware; Newsgroups
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI08-013
       Author: Muchmore, Michael W
        Title: There and back again
       Source: PC Magazine (August 1, 1997) v16 n14 p40
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: SmartBrowser; NetJumper
 Product Name: HistoryTree; NetJumper
     Abstract: Announces two browser utilities which replace the linear
               navigation between URLs provided by Back and Forward buttons
               by allowing users to skip to a URL that is not on the Back
               and Forward trail. HistoryTree ($10) from SmartBrowser Corp.
               provides a graphical tree view of Internet browsing and each
               time a new Web page is visited it adds a small icon to its
               chart. Users can jump to any page by clicking on its icon.
               NetJumper ($19.95) from NetJumper installs a floating button
               bar on the screen. As the user surfs, the program creates a
               list of all the links on a Web page. Afterward, a user can
               explore each link by clicking on the Forward button and
               opening the page in the browser. It also lets users access
               any of the new URLs from a list view that can be saved as a
               file or play a SlideShow option which plays a succession of
               Web pages from the list it has built or by using manually
               added URLs. Includes one screen display.!
Descriptor(s): Web Tools; Web Browsers; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI01-285
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Recently used programs redux -- RUPL2 adds configuration
               options and a graphical front end
       Source: PC Magazine (January 21, 1997) v16 n2 p207-212
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: PC Magazine Online
 Product Name: RUPL2
     Abstract: PC TECH/UTILITIES introduces a new version of the RUPL
               (recently used programs list) utility, which adds a list of
               recently run programs to the Windows 95 Programs menu.
               Explains that the new version, RUPL2, allows the list to be
               moved to the Start menu. Overviews the basic functions of
               the utility, explaining that it provides a Recently Used
               menu that was originally included in Windows 95 betas, but
               removed from the final version. Indicates that RUPL2 makes
               the Recently Used menu user-configurable, to provide the
               Start menu option, and that it maintains its own
               configuration editing utility. Notes some of the utility's
               source code, and points out that these changes are useful
               additions to the original RUPL. Includes three screen
               displays and one product source guide.
Descriptor(s): Program Optimization; Upgrade; Window Software; Utility
               Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI01-281
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Mass data transit -- Three handy techniques for moving large
               files between PCs
       Source: PC Magazine (January 21, 1997) v16 n2 p193-194
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
 Company Name: PC Magazine Online; Traveling Software
 Product Name: SLICE/SPLICE; PKZIP; LapLink
     Abstract: PC TECH/TUTOR discusses methods of transferring files
               between two PCs. Points out that transferring large files
               can be problematic, since they are often too large to be
               copied to floppy disk. Suggests three methods of
               transferring files, which help to simplify the process.
               Provides instruction on how to perform the necessary
               functions. Includes: SLICE and SPLICE, DOS-based companion
               utilities which break a file into pieces to fit onto floppy
               disks, and then puts it back together on the receiving hard
               disk; the PKZIP 2.04g "-&" option, which creates a
               compressed, multiple-floppy disk archive of the file to be
               retrieved by PKUNZIP on another computer; and direct cable
               connections, such as LapLink ($NA) from Traveling Software
               (800), which provide a cable and software for moving files
               from computer to computer by wire. Includes two screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Data Transmission; Compression; Utility Program; Computer
               Instruction; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI01-014
       Author: Lidsky, David
        Title: A child's view of the Web
       Source: PC Magazine (January 7, 1997) v16 n1 p40
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: InterGO Communications; Connectsoft
 Product Name: InterGO; KidWeb; E-Mail for Kids
     Abstract: Announces three new browsers and e-mail programs designed to
               allow children to access the Internet. InterGO ($49.95) from
               InterGO Communications (972) now supports HTML 3.0 tags and
               plug-ins. Its filter, KinderGard, determines site
               appropriateness for children by age group. It can filter out
               unwanted content from newsgroups, search results, and
               e-mail, as well as IRC chat. KidWeb ($39.95) from
               ConnectSoft (206) is a browser for children ages 6 to 10. It
               has a user-friendly interface and is highly customizable by
               parents. Parents can list banned sites or keywords or create
               a list of approved sites. E-Mail for Kids Version 3.0
               ($29.95) from ConnectSoft adds a child's own e-mail
               interface to a parent's account. It supports all the major
               online services as well as cc:Mail, MCI Mail, and Internet
               e-mail. It can screen both incoming and outgoing mail for
               content. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Electronic Mail; Web Browsers; Utility Program; Internet;
               Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI01-013
       Author: Perenson, Melissa J
        Title: Consolidating messages
       Source: PC Magazine (January 7, 1997) v16 n1 p40
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: ConnectSoft; General Magic; Global Village Communications;
               Wall Data
 Product Name: EMail Connection; Magic Cap for Windows 95; FocalPoint;
               Rumba Mail Featuring 3M's Post-it Software Notes
     Abstract: Announces four new e-mail utility programs. EMail Connection
               ($49.95) from ConnectSoft (800) can automate the filing of
               e-mail across multiple services such as America Online,
               CompuServe, MCI Mail, Prodigy, any ISP, and any LAN e-mail
               system. Faxes and pages can be sent from within the program.
               Magic Cap for Windows 95 ($49) from General Magic (888) is
               aimed at home- and small-office markets. It supports e-mail
               communication via any POP3 ISP or America Online. Its
               address book captures the addresses of incoming messages and
               the program is integrated with Microsoft Internet Explorer
               3.0 (included). FocalPoint 5.5 ($89) from Global Village
               Communications (800) not only manages e-mail but also
               handles data, voice, and fax communications. It now offers
               support for Windows NT Workstation 3.51 or later. Rumba Mail
               Featuring 3M's Post-it Software Notes ($149) from Wall Data
               (800) is designed for LAN and WAN. Includes two screen di!
               splays.
Descriptor(s): Electronic Mail; Utility Program; Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-003
       Author: Gottesman, Ben
        Title: Utility quicksand
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p29
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: INSIDE PC LABS column discusses how PC Labs tested the
               performance decreases experienced by PCs when they run
               antivirus software. The Business Winstone 97 benchmark tests
               were run on two systems, one of which had the utilities
               loaded and one which did not. Performance degradation ranged
               from none (for IBM AntiVirus) to eight percent (for Norton
               AntiVirus and PC-cillin). To further examine the effect of
               these antivirus utilities, they were tested in combination
               with other utilities. Reports that combination of Norton
               AntiVirus and Norton Utilities reduced performance by 20
               percent. Adding utilities also increased boot times: the
               largest increase in boot times was caused by Norton
               Utilities and the NetWare login script process. Despite
               these problems, Norton Utilities and AntiVirus were awarded
               the "Editors' Choice" honor because it was felt that their
               value outweighed any loss in system performance. Includes
               two sc! reen displays.
Descriptor(s): Benchmark Testing; Utility Program; Virus; Speed; Security
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-055
       Author: Proffit, Brian Stone, M David Mendelson, Edward
        Title: OS/2, NT, & WIN 3.x utilities -- Not everyone in the world
               uses Windows 95. We showcase some of the best utilities
               around to help users of OS/2, Windows NT, Windows...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p251-256
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to utility programs for OS/2,
               Window NT, and Windows 3.x. Includes descriptions of 33
               utilities for OS/2 (three antivirus, seven backup, two data
               compression, two data transfer, six desktop management,
               three disk management, four interface, two Internet, and
               five system). Also includes descriptions of 12 utilities for
               Windows NT (four antivirus, two backup, three disk
               management, and three system) and provides descriptions of
               14 utilities for DOS and Windows 3.x which include
               antivirus, desktop enhancers, utility libraries, file viewer
               reformatters, file managers, disk browsers, file
               compressors, an command line enhancer. Notes that, because
               the programs are dissimilar, there is no "Editors' Choice."
               Includes one illustration and six screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Window Software;
               Software Review; Internet; File Management
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-053
       Author: Munro, Kathryn
        Title: Internet filtering utilities -- The Internet can be a
               wonderful resource for your children, but it has its dark
               side, too. Monitor and control your kids' online...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p235-240
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Microsystems Software; Solid Oak Software
 Product Name: Microsoft Cyber Patrol; Cybersitter
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to seven Internet filtering
               utilities that can be used to regulate the Net content which
               children can access. The simplest of these programs do not
               require elaborate configuration routines, but the more
               sophisticated can filter the Web, chats, e-mail, and
               applications, and can also control the amount of time
               children spend on the Net. Explains that they monitor the
               data stream coming from the network to block specific words
               and sites. All seven perform well, but the author notes that
               it is impossible to develop a foolproof filter list because
               of differing views of what is and what is not objectionable
               and the constant changing of the Internet. Cyber Patrol 3.1
               ($29.95 for registration, $19.95 for six month subscription)
               from Microsystems Software, Framingham, MA (800, 508) and
               Cybersitter 2.1 ($39.95) from Solid Oak Software, Santa
               Barbara, CA (800, 805) are "Editors' Choice." Includes one!
               illustration, one table, and seven screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Filters; Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Window Software;
               Software Review; Internet; Children
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-051
       Author: Mendelson, Edward Canter, Sheryl Gottesman, Ben Z
               Koulouthos, Yvonne
        Title: Internet off-line browsers -- Your connection to the
               Internet is slow; your hard disk is fast. And you're on the
               road a lot. But that's no excuse for not...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p207-218
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: InContext Systems; Tennyson Maxwell
 Product Name: InContext FlashSite; Teleport Pro
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to 15 off-line Web browsers.
               Explains that these programs search and download pages and
               organize them on the hard disk. When the user wants to view
               the pages, the program launches a Web browser - usually IE
               or Navigator, although one program reviewed, Folio Web
               Retriever, uses its own proprietary viewer. Includes a
               sidebar listing the features of five cache browsers that
               allow users to revisit files they have already seen.
               Predicts that by early in 1998, the major browsers -
               Netscape Navigator and Microsoft Internet Explorer - will
               have incorporat many of the features of these programs. Very
               favorably review InContext FlashSite ($35) from InContext
               Systems of Toronto, Canada (800, 416) and Teleport Pro ($40)
               from Tennyson Maxwell of Cambridge, MA (617), receiving
               "Editors' Choice" honors. Includes one illustration, two
               tables, and 15 screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Web Browsers; Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Window
               Software; Software Review; Internet
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-050
       Author: Ozer, Jan Mendelson, Edward Canter, Sheryl Boscardin, Andrew
        Title: Essential Internet utilities -- If Microsoft and Netscape
               get their way, your OS and browser will someday merge, and
               your browser will need more utilities than ever.
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p199-205
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to a number of utility programs
               deemed essential by the writers of PC Magazine. Includes two
               animation programs, three streaming audio programs, one MIDI
               player, two streaming video programs, a QuickTime plug-in,
               two MPEG-1 video players, two VRML browsers, a chat plug-in,
               three search utilities, two rich-content Portable Document
               Format (PDF) file viewers, and two miscellaneous programs.
               Because of the diversity of the uses of these programs,
               there is no "Editors' Choice. Notes that all of the
               utilities listed are available from the specified Web sites
               and are freeware. Includes a sidebar by Neil Randall
               describing two browser accelerators, an internet organizer,
               two Internet fax utilities, and a Java security program.
               Includes one illustration and three screen displays
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Animation; Vendor Guide; Window Software;
               Software Review; Internet; Streaming Audio
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-049
       Author: Rigney, Steve
        Title: Network backup -- Today's networks don't use just a single
               network operating system. These four storage management
               systems for NetWare and Windows NT...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p187-196
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Cheyenne Software
 Product Name: ARCserve 6.0 for NetWare, Enterprise Edition; ARCserve 6.0
               for Windows NT, Enterprise Edition
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to four utility programs designed
               for network backup. Windows NT Server and NetWare both
               include backup utilities, but they lack the advanced
               features of the products reviewed. Programs reviewed were
               rated for installation and configuration, scheduling and
               management, and interoperability. Includes a table comparing
               features of the four systems and benchmark test results of
               performance. A sidebar describes Replica for NetWare 3.0
               ($499 for single server) from Stac Inc. of San Diego, CA
               (800, 619), which was not included because only the NetWare
               version is available. Other products work with both Net and
               Windows NT Server. A sidebar by Padraic Boyle describes
               option available in tape backup drives. ARCserve 6.0 for
               NetWare ($1, and ARCserve 6.0 for Windows NT ($1,395) from
               Cheyenne Softwa Roslyn Heights, NY (800) are "Editors'
               Choice." Includes two illustrations, one graph, one table,
               and f! ive screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Window Software;
               Software Review; Local Area Networks; Benchmark Testing
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows NT; IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-048
       Author: Morris, John Mendelson, Edward Haskin, David Buehler, Steve
        Title: Miscellaneous utilities -- Want to build a better desktop,
               keep your data private, get the most out of your hard disk,
               or just find some great shareware or...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p179-185
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to miscellaneous utilities for use
               with Windows 95. Includes descriptions of two desktop
               enhancers, five file compression utilities, three data
               security utilities for encrypting data on a hard disk, two
               partitioning utilities, one multiboot utility, and two
               display utilities. Also includes a sidebar by David Haskin,
               Edward Mendelson, Neil Randall, and Barry Simon that lists
               their choices for the seven best shareware/freeware
               utilities. Concludes that, because of the wide variety of
               types of programs described, there is no "Editors' Choice."
               Includes one illustration and 15 screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Compression; Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Window Software;
               Software Review; Security; Shareware
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-047
       Author: Seltzer, Larry
        Title: Performance enhancers -- The easiest, most cost-effective
               way to improve PC or CD-ROM drive performance may not be a
               hardware upgrade. Six utilities offer...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p165-174
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to six utility programs designed to
               improve the performance of a PC or its components. Explains
               that they are generally less expensive than other options,
               such as adding RAM, upgrading to a faster CPU or hard disk,
               or installing a faster graphics card. Reviewed three
               categories: RAM compressors (two), disk accelerators (one),
               and CD-ROM drive accelerators (three). Says that most can
               provide a benefit, but some have the potential to slow
               performance. Notes that reviews list the areas in which each
               is most and least effective. Also includes benchmark test
               results comparing performance of the RAM compressors and
               CD-ROM accelerators. Lists no "Editors' Choice." Says RAM
               compressors either hindered performance or improved it by an
               insignificant amount. Notes that three CD-ROM accelerators
               earned honorable mentions, but not a clear winner since all
               had similar test results. Includes one illustra! tion, one
               table, and six screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Optimization; Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Window
               Software; Software Review; Speed; Compression
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-046
       Author: Mendelson, Edward Haskin, David
        Title: File-view utilities -- The can openers of the working world,
               these essential utilities can quickly display files in a
               wide range of formats. No longer...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p153-163
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Inso
 Product Name: Quick View Plus
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to five file viewers. Explains that
               the basic tasks that these programs perform is to display
               the contents of a file quickly, as well as searching for
               text within a file and possibly converting files between
               formats and providing file management features. Includes a
               sidebar describing four special-purpose graphics file
               viewers and another sidebar that describes four file viewers
               that allow PC Windows users to view Macintosh-formatted
               disks. Says the Macintosh OS includes a cross-platform
               file-exchange utility and the file viewer in Windows 95,
               Quick View, can display the contents of only a few major te
               and graphics file formats. Recommends Quick View Plus 4.0
               ($59. from Inso Corp. of Boston, MA (800, 617), the
               "Editors' Ch Requires a 486-based PC or better with 8MB RAM,
               5MB hard disk space and Windows 95 or NT 4.0. Includes one
               illustration, one table, and seven screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Document Viewer; File Management; Vendor Guide; Window
               Software; Software Review; Utility Program; Macintosh
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows 95; Microsoft Windows NT; 486-based PC
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-045
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Uninstall utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p137-140
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: MicroHelp
 Product Name: Uninstaller 4
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to five uninstall utilities for use
               with Windows 95 and NT. Explains that, under DOS, removing a
               program was a simple matter of removing all the files in its
               directory. Under Windows, applications fill the hard disk
               with files that use space and serve no purpose. Says these
               utilities can remove every trace of an application from the
               disk. They monitor an installation so they know which files
               were added to a system and can remove apps that they did not
               monitor, but not as thoroughly. Most of them back up the
               programs they remove, so they can be restored if the users
               change their minds. Notes that a safe feature is the ability
               to move applications, but says other functions should be
               used only by experts, and only when the utility makes a
               backup. Uninstaller 4 ($35) from MicroHelp Inc.of Marietta,
               GA (800, 770) is the "Editors' Choice." Requires a 486-based
               PC with 8MB RAM. Includes one illus! tration, one table, and
               five screen displays.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Maintenance; Vendor Guide; Window Software;
               Software Review; Utility Program; Backup
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows; 486-based PC
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI04-042
       Author: Shaffer, Gail Haskin, David
        Title: The 1997 utility guide -- More than 250 utilities to
               fine-tune your PC and help you be more productive.
       Source: PC Magazine (April 8, 1997) v16 n7 p100-256
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Symantec; Microsoft
 Product Name: Norton Utilities for Windows 95; Microsoft Power Toys;
               Microsoft Plus!
     Abstract: Presents PC Magazine's annual buyers' guide to utilities.
               Includes a sidebar that summarizes the utilities contained
               in Windows 3.1x and MS-DOS 6.2x, Windows 95, Windows NT
               Workstation 4.0, and IBM OS/2 Warp 4.0. Described utilities
               grouped into the following categories: network backup,
               Internet essentials, off-line browsers, antivirus,
               diagnostics, uninstallers, off-line searching, filtering,
               e-mail encryption, file-viewers, performance enhancers,
               miscellaneous, and OS/2, NT, & Win 3.x utilities. Each
               section offers a buyer's guide comparing features and an
               "Editor's Choice," and some have benchmark tests results. A
               sidebar lists three "essential utilities:" Norton Utilities
               for Windows 95 2.0 ($79) from Symantec Corp. (800),
               Microsoft Power Toys (free) from Microsoft's Web site, and
               Microsoft Plus! ($54.95) from Microsoft Corp. (800). Says
               all are "Editors' Choice" selections. Includes 107 sc! reen
               displays, 10 tables, 36 illustrations, and one graph.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Electronic Mail; Vendor Guide; Window
               Software; Internet; Benchmark Testing; Software Review
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows NT; Microsoft Windows
               95; OS/2; DOS
        Grade: A A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI02-085
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: URL tracking made easy -- ClipAid lets you snip and save the
               URLs you want to keep
       Source: PC Magazine (February 4, 1997) v16 n3 p253-256
    Pub. Type: Articles, News & Columns
     Abstract: Offers a utility program entitled "ClipAid" which provides
               users with a way to clip Uniform Resource Locator (URL)
               addresses and store them for future use. Requires Windows 95
               or Windows NT 4.0. Says users copy the URL to the clipboard
               which ClipAid monitors and then saves in a history list.
               Permits users to paste URLs to the desktop to create an
               Internet shortcut. Provides detailed instructions for
               installing and using the program as well as information on
               how the program was created using Microsoft Visual C++ and
               the Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC).
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; C Programming Language; Internet; Window
               Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 97PI03-052
       Author: Mace, Thomas
        Title: Web graphics tools -- On the Web, less is more. Here are the
               tools you need for tweaking graphics to fit the limited
               palettes and bandwidths imposed by...
       Source: PC Magazine (March 4, 1997) v16 n5 p141-161
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: 1Automata; Ulead Systems; Equilibrium
 Product Name: Web Hotspots; PhotoImpact GIF Animator; DeBabelizer Pro for
               Windows 95/NT
     Abstract: Presents a guide to Web graphics tools. These tools are
               needed because the Web restricts users to 256 colors, and
               rather than the large graphics that can be delivered across
               fast LANs and off CD-ROMs, the Web requires tiny graphics
               that can fit the narrow pipes of dial-up users. Includes
               reviews of five image-map editors, six GIF animators, and
               five palette optimizers & anti-aliasing tools. For each
               category of software, a buyers' guide comparing features is
               provided. Because of the Web's severe color limitation,
               palette optimizers may be the most import category for
               professional Web designers. Rates nearly every tool reviewed
               as a possible useful addition to a Web designer's toolbox.
               "Editors' Choice" awards went to Web Hotspots 2.01 ($49)
               from 1Automata (image-map editor), PhotoImpact GIF Animator
               ($29.95) from Ulead Systems Inc., and DeBabelizer Pro for
               Windows 95/NT ($595) from Equilibrium. Includes one illust!
               ration, 15 illustrations, three tables.
Descriptor(s): Graphics; Web Tools; World Wide Web; Utility Program;
               Software Review; Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows NT; Microsoft Windows
               95
        Grade: A A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 96PL10-011
       Author: Delio, Michelle
        Title: Software short takes
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (October 1, 1996) v8 n10 p10-14
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Outlook Software; Traveling Software; 3M; Kent Marsh
 Product Name: Real Estate Organizer; LapLink for Win95; Post-It Software
               Notes; Winshield for Win95
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to four software titles. "Short
               Takes" reviews include: Real Estate Organizer User's Guide
               ($495), an integrated database program for real estate
               professionals from Outlook Software Corp. of Dallas, TX
               (214), rated five out of five; LapLink v7.5 for Win95
               ($149), a data transfer utility program from Traveling
               Software of Bothell, WA (206), rated five; Post-It Software
               Notes ($27.95), a desktop management tool from 3M Corp.
               (800), rated four-and-one-half; and Winshield for Win95
               ($49.95), a utility program from Kent Marsh Ltd. of Houston,
               TX (713), rated four. Includes one screen display and two
               photos.
Descriptor(s): Real Estate; Vendor Guide; Software Review; Database;
               Utility Program; Disk Files; Personal Information Manager
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: A A B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI11-073
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Attach notes to files -- Explorer Notes adds a notes column
               to Explorer's fine details
       Source: PC Magazine (November 5, 1996) v15 n19 p307-316
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: PC Magazine Utilities
 Product Name: Explorer Notes
     Abstract: Spotlights Explorer Notes, a Windows 95 utility that allows
               the user to associate a note of up to 255 characters with
               any file or folder. Adds that the utility displays the note
               in a fifth column that is added to Explorer's detail view.
               Instructs the reader on installing and using Explorer Notes,
               as well as how to program the utility. Includes how to
               extend the Windows 95 shell, how to use Delphi to reduce the
               size of DLLs, and how to add a fifth column to Windows 95's
               listview control. Includes three screen displays, one
               program listing, and one product resource guide.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Computer Instruction; Utility Program;
               Window Software
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI11-023
       Author: Perenson, Melissa J
        Title: Searching the Internet in style
       Source: PC Magazine (November 5, 1996) v15 n19 p73
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Symantec
 Product Name: Internet FastFind
     Abstract: Announces the upcoming release of Internet FastFind
               ($49.95), an Internet search utility and tool set for
               Windows 95 and Windows NT from Symantec Corp. of Cupertino,
               CA (800, 541). Explains that this is a single interface for
               searching multiple search engines, then providing results in
               a single list. Also includes an FTP-management tool and
               Internet-based file-searching utility, as well as a tool for
               merging bookmarks among multiple browsers. Indicates that
               this new product is a "hot prospect." Includes one screen
               display.
Descriptor(s): Online Searching; Web Management; Internet; Utility Program;
               Web Tools; Web Browsers
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI09-234
       Author: Perenson, Melissa J
        Title: Zipping along
       Source: PC Magazine (September 24, 1996) v15 n16 p80
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: MicroHelp
 Product Name: MicroHelp Zip
     Abstract: Announces MicroHelp Zip ($30), a file compression utility
               from MicroHelp Inc., Marietta, GA (800, 770). The program
               allows users to encode, unencode, and manage compressed
               files through use of drag and drop. It can search among or
               within archives for specific files and display a file from
               an archive before extracting it. It also makes it simple to
               create self-extracting archives. Includes one screen
               display.
Descriptor(s): Compression; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI10-122
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: MonSys monitors Windows 95 -- MonSys improves on the Windows
               95 System Monitor utility
       Source: PC Magazine (October 8, 1996) v15 n17 p345-356
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: PC TECH/UTILITIES column provides a look at the MonSys
               system monitoring utility for Windows 95. Explains that
               MonSys acts as a replacement for the System Monitor,
               offering the data in a more flexible interface. Instructs
               the user how to install and use MonSys, including
               customization and programming options. Also overviews
               several of the MonSys reporting components and how to
               manipulate them. Includes four screen displays, one table,
               two program listings, and one product source guide.
Descriptor(s): Software Tools; Utility Program; Window Software;
               Troubleshooting; Data Analysis
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI10-078
       Author: Moller, Arie
        Title: Protecting yourself from evil e-mail
       Source: PC Magazine (October 8, 1996) v15 n17 p192
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Integralis; Trend Micro; McAfee Associates
 Product Name: MIMEsweeper; InterScan E-Mail VirusWall; WebShield; WebScan
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to Internet e-mail virus detection
               software. Features three server-side and one client-side
               (desktop) solutions. Includes: MIMEsweeper ($995, 25 users;
               $7,000, 1,000 users), a server-side solution from
               Integralis, Inc. (206); InterScan E-Mail VirusWall ($995,
               50-user license), a server solution from Trend Micro Inc.
               (800); and WebShield ($3,995, two-year site license
               subscription), a Unix-based server solution from McAfee
               Associates Inc. (408). Also includes WebScan ($30, street
               price), a client-side product, also from McAfee Associates
               Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Electronic Mail; Client-Server Computing; Utility
               Program; Vendor Guide; Software Review
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI09-074
       Author: Bonner, Paul
        Title: Now you're playing with PowerToys -- Microsoft's gift makes
               Windows 95 an OS experienced users can love
       Source: PC Magazine (September 10, 1996) v15 n15 p299-302
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: Microsoft
 Product Name: Microsoft PowerToys; Microsoft Windows 95
     Abstract: Discusses the PowerToys utilities for Windows 95, which can
               be downloaded from Microsoft's Web site. Notes that
               PowerToys includes a collection of utilities that allow
               Windows 95 power users to fine-tune their operating system.
               Hints that these are the tools that did not pass the Windows
               95 "idiot-proofing test" and therefore did not become
               standard Windows 95 utilities. Explains that Windows 95 is
               designed to ward off destructive mistakes by novice users
               and that the PowerToys involves some fine-tuning, allowing
               the user to go beyond the secure environment. Gives a brief
               description of each of the included utilities, questioning
               the need for several of them. Includes utilities for
               interface customization, shell extensions, taskbar
               customization, Web tools, and "silly stuff." Includes four
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Window Software; Utility Program; Optimization; Operating
               Systems; User Interface
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI08-014
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Off-line readers deliver the world of the Web to your hard
               disk
       Source: PC Magazine (August 1, 1996) v15 n14 p43-44
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: FreeLoader; Bourbon Street Software; FirstFloor; Traveling
               Software; ForeFront Group
 Product Name: FreeLoader; Internet Marauder; Smart Bookmarks; WebEx;
               WebWhacker
     Abstract: Presents reviews of five off-line readers which can be used
               to download World Wide Web sites to a hard disk so the user
               can browse the contents at hard disk speed at leisure. The
               five readers reviewed are FreeLoader v1.0 (free) from
               FreeLoader Inc. of Washington, DC (202); Internet Marauder
               v1.4 ($10) from Bourbon Street Software of New Orleans, LA
               (504); Smart Bookmarks ($25) from FirstFloor of Mountain
               View, CA (800, 415); WebEx ($29.95) from Traveling Software
               of Bothell, WA (800, 206); and WebWhacker v2.0 ($49.95) from
               ForeFront Group, Houston, TX (800, 713). Rates FreeLoader
               the easiest of the five to use, while WebWhacker is the most
               complete. Calls these among the most innovative and powerful
               off-line readers and lists three comparable programs with
               URLs that users can find on the Internet. Includes five
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Web Tools; Utility Program; Software Review; Vendor Guide;
               Window Software; Web Browsers; Add-on
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows; Microsoft Windows 95;
               Microsoft Windows NT
        Grade: B B B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI06-226
       Author: Nadel, Brian
        Title: Dr. Solomon's postdoctoral course in virus scanning
       Source: PC Magazine (June 25, 1996) v15 n12 p73
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: S&S Software International
 Product Name: Dr. Solomon's AntiVirus Toolkit
     Abstract: Reports improvements recently made to Dr. Solomon's
               AntiVirus Toolkit from S&S Software International. In an
               earlier review the program was faulted for its inability to
               deal with macro viruses, which can infect apparently safe
               document files, and for its lack of certification by the
               National Computer Security Association (NCSA). An available
               upgrade, which will be sent automatically to registered
               users of the program, corrects both these deficiencies. In
               testing, the upgraded program successfully identified and
               repaired a macro virus in a Word for Windows file.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Utility Program; Window Software; Troubleshooting
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI06-225
       Author: Nadel, Brian
        Title: First Aid 95: potent PC therapy
       Source: PC Magazine (June 25, 1996) v15 n12 p73
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: CyberMedia
 Product Name: First Aid 95; First Aid 95 Deluxe
     Abstract: Reports on changes made to First Aid 95 by CyberMedia. The
               program was reviewed in January, and although it did a good
               job of identifying Windows file problems, it suffered from
               many general protection faults and was potentially dangerous
               in the hands of inexperienced users. Version 2.1, recently
               released, can repair more problems than the earlier version
               and is much more stable. Update files are available from
               online services or the vendor's Web site. CyberMedia has
               recently released First Aid 95 Deluxe, which has a feature
               called CyberFix that can access the Internet to perform
               automatic updates to Windows 95. Article presents
               instructions on how to use this new program. In testing,
               CyberFix installed Microsoft's Windows 95 Service Pack very
               quickly. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Diagnostics; Troubleshooting; Window Software; Utility
               Program
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI07-049
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Control installations under Windows 95 -- A new 32-bit
               version of InCtrl understands the registry and long
               filenames
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1996) v15 n13 p307-350
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: Instructs the user on how to perform Windows 95 installation
               using InCtrl v3 ($NA), a utility program available online
               from PC Magazine. Explains that the utility allows the user
               to track changes that are made to the registry during
               software installations. Points out that installations tend
               to "litter the disk," and InCtrl should help remedy this
               problem. Notes that the program uses a wizard-style
               interface to control an installation procedure. Mentions
               that it can also be used to uninstall programs. Includes one
               product source guide, one table, and three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): File Management; Utility Program; Tutorial; Disk Files;
               Window Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 96PL07-003
       Author: Leyenberger, Arthur
        Title: Don't leave home without these handy little helpers
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (July 1, 1996) v8 n7 p20
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Extend; FormGen
 Product Name: WinZones; WinZip; WinModem
     Abstract: LAPTOP OFFICE discusses three handy utility programs
               compatible with Microsoft Windows. Reports that WinZones
               ($35) from Extend Inc. of Pleasanton, CA (800) is a small
               utility that provides the ultimate clock for those doing
               business internationally. Says the following shareware is
               available on a CD-ROM ($14) released by the Association of
               Shareware Professionals and produced by FormGen (800):
               WinZip ($NA), which zips and unzips files within Windows,
               and WinModem ($NA), which provides a display of the status
               of PC Card Modems as they are being used.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Shareware; Clock; Compression; Modem
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-259
       Author: Proffit, Brian
        Title: InterNotes: more than just a browser -- Lotus's solution for
               connecting business with the Internet
       Source: PC Magazine (May 28, 1996) v15 n10 p207-216
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: Lotus Development
 Product Name: InterNotes
     Abstract: PC TECH/INTERNET TOOLS column discusses the InterNotes
               utility that comes with Notes v4.0. Says it uses a server to
               retrieve information from the Internet, convert it into the
               Notes database format, and make it available to any Notes
               client. Adds that while it has good graphics support, it
               does not support frames, tiled background images, blinking
               text, background text, and marquee scrolling. Notes that it
               allows the network administrator security control over
               access to Web pages. Also says it needs to keep pace with
               browser upgrades such as animation, multimedia, and support
               for Java applets. Includes four screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Web Tools; Web Browsers; Internetworking; Tutorial; Utility
               Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-222
       Author: Perenson, Melissa J
        Title: Strike a pose
       Source: PC Magazine (May 28, 1996) v15 n10 p75
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Fractal Design
 Product Name: Poser
     Abstract: Announces the availability of Poser ($199), a Windows 95
               design tool from Fractal Design Corp. of Aptos, CA (800,
               408). Says it helps even the artistically challenged to
               create realistic-looking human forms. Adds that it
               understands the intricacies of the human body, provides for
               dragging and dropping various body parts that can be
               assembled into the desired positions, comes with light
               sources and texture maps, and includes a selection of male
               and female body types and sizes. Includes a screen display
               and a summary card.
Descriptor(s): Anatomy; Modeling; Three-dimensional Graphics; Utility
               Program; Window Software
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-212
       Author: Morris, John Rupley, Sebastian
        Title: Get plugged in: Navigator plug-ins that liven up the Web
       Source: PC Magazine (May 28, 1996) v15 n10 p44-51
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to six Navigator plug-in programs.
               Products reviewed are: CoolTalk ($69.95) from Insoft, an
               audio- and data-collaboration tool that offers full-duplex
               audioconferencing; Crescendo Plus ($19.95) from LiveUpdate,
               a viable alternative to RealAudio; Formula One/Net (free)
               from Visual Components, which enables embedding
               Excel-compatible spreadsheets within Navigator; Net Toob
               ($14.95) from Duplexx Software, which facilitates viewing
               video or animation; QuickSilver (free) from Micrografx,
               which allows using Designer to create and display
               vector-based Web graphics; Sizzler ($NA) from Totally Hip,
               which makes it easy to design animated Web pages; Web
               Translator ($49.95, full version; or free Web download) from
               Globalink, which can translate from French, German, or
               Spanish to English or vice versa; and WorldView (free) from
               Intervista Software, a 3D Web browser. Includes three screen
               displays and a sidebar.
Descriptor(s): Web Browsers; Vendor Guide; Add-on; Audio Processing; Video
               Processing; Shareware; Utility Program
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Unix workstation; Netscape Navigator
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI06-031
       Author: Perenson, Melissa J
        Title: Make a dash for the Web
       Source: PC Magazine (June 11, 1996) v15 n11 p73
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Starfish Software; Microhelp
 Product Name: Starfish Internet Utilities; PowerDesk
     Abstract: Announces Starfish Internet Utilities ($50), a Web utility
               from Starfish Software Inc., Scotts Valley, CA (800, 408).
               The program uses the same interface as the Windows 3.1 and
               95 Dashboard utilities and allows users to monitor their
               online time, system resources, and modem activity. It can
               also alert users when selected Web sites have been updated.
               It is a useful and easy way to organize Web bookmarks. It
               works with any 32-bit Web browser. Also announces a version
               1.1 maintenance kit for PowerDesk ($49. a competitor to
               Dashboard 95 from Microhelp, Marietta, GA (800, 770). With
               the kit, the program can include Web-site shortcuts in the
               PowerDesk panel. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Web Tools; Utility Program; Window Software; Auditing; Web
               Browsers; Add-on
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-158
       Author: Boyle, Padraic Munro, Jay Rovengo, Rick Seltzer, Larry
        Title: More Internet utilities -- From file-transfer programs to
               cyber censors, we test a grab bag full of practical Internet
               tools. Most are available straight...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p214-219
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to Internet utility programs,
               most of which are available on the World Wide Web. Includes
               reviews of five FTP clients, six screening and filtering
               utilities, seven time keepers and monitors, and three
               uuencoders. The article lists pricing and contact
               information for commercial products. Freeware and shareware
               products are described. There is no "Editors' Choice" among
               the programs reviewed. Includes one illustration and eight
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Web Tools; Utility Program; Internet; Software Review;
               Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-127
       Author: Lidsky, David Mace, Thomas Muchmore, Michael W Rabinovitch,
               Eyal
        Title: Internet plug-ins and helpers -- We pick the top 30 helper
               apps and Netscape Navigator plug-ins
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p212-213
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to 30 Internet utilities in four
               categories. These programs are all shareware or freeware and
               are available for downloading from the Web. Products
               reviewed include six audio utilities, seven graphics
               utilities, eight video utilities, and nine virtual reality
               utilities. Includes one illustration.
Descriptor(s): Internet; Utility Program; Shareware; Software Review;
               Multimedia; Virtual Reality; Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-120
       Author: Canter, Sheryl
        Title: Internet search tools -- So many millions of megabytes out
               there and so little time. We review six search utilities
               that help you scour the Internet for...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p207-210
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Quarterdeck
 Product Name: WebCompass
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to six Internet search tools.
               Some of them, databases on CD-ROM, allow a user to examine
               sites off-line to refine searches before connecting to the
               Internet. Others query the search engines on the Web and
               build databases and indexes for the user. WebCompass v1.0
               ($139) from Quarterdeck Corp., Marina Del Rey, CA (800, 310)
               is the "Editors' Choice." Includes six screen displays and
               one illustration.
Descriptor(s): Web Tools; Online Searching; Utility Program; Software
               Review; Window Software; Vendor Guide; CD-ROM
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows; CD-ROM Drive
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-110
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Internet organizers
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p197-202
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Internet Solutions; Surflogic LLC
 Product Name: NetBuddy; Surfbot
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to nine Internet organizers.
               These programs replace the bookmarks or Favorites menu of a
               Web browser. Some of these tell the user that a site has
               changed, others also show the user the changed text. Some
               can jump to a Web site as soon as their name is clicked in
               the organizer. Some can also create HTML pages which contain
               sets of links which can be loaded into a browser. These
               programs "can greatly increase your ability to glean
               information from the Web." NetBuddy (free) from Internet
               Solutions Inc., Seattle, WA (206) and Surfbot ($40) from
               Surflogic LLC, San Francisco, CA (415) are "Editors'
               Choice." Includes one illustration, one table, and nine
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Web Tools; Web Browsers; Utility Program; Software Review;
               Internet; Information Retrieval; Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-084
       Author: Schindler, Esther
        Title: OS/2 utilities -- For all that sets OS/2 Warp apart from
               Windows 95, its utility needs are quite similar. OS/2's
               object-based desktop, backup, and...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p191-196
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to utility programs for OS/2.
               Includes reviews of five desktop enhancements, a listing of
               three antivirus programs, reviews of four backup programs,
               three memory management programs, one uninstaller, two file
               manager replacements, a disk utility, two "Swiss Army
               Knives," and five miscellaneous utilities. As one would
               expect with such a diverse collection, there is no "Editors'
               Choice." Includes seven screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Desktop Software; Software Review; OS/2;
               Memory; File Management; Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; OS/2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-073
       Author: Haskin, David
        Title: More essential problem solvers -- Call them esoteric, call
               them niche-market, but the tools we've profiled here tackle
               a broad range of system and performance...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p187-190
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to 11 "uncategorizable" utility
               programs, including three compression programs, a
               four-module set of interconnected utilities, two file
               conversion utilities, two utilities to allows Windows 3.1
               apps to use long file names under Windows 95, a program to
               provide faster print drivers for color ink jet printers, and
               a screen saver. Includes one illustration and eight screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Disk Files; Utility Program; Software Review; Window
               Software; Vendor Guide; Conversions; Compression
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-068
       Author: Rigney, Steve
        Title: Network backup utilities -- Your NetWare server is better
               protected than ever. Today's network backup packages are
               reliable and fast
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p181-186
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Cheyenne Software
 Product Name: ARCserve for NetWare
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to four network backup utilities
               for NetWare. The four programs provide a Windows-based
               administration utility and a set of NLMs. The utilities are
               generally more intuitive than NetWare's System Console and
               can manage several servers from a single location. Things to
               consider when choosing a network backup package are ease of
               installation and configuration and flexibility. The programs
               reviewed are rated on installation and configuration,
               management and administration, compatibility, and
               performance. Includes a benchmark test and a buyer's guide
               comparing features of the programs reviewed. ARCserve for
               NetWare ($795 for single server, $1,895 for enterprise
               edition) from Cheyenne Software Inc., Roslyn Heights, NY
               (800) is "Editors' Choice." Includes two illustrations, one
               table, and two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Utility Program; Software Review; Window Software;
               Local Area Networks; Vendor Guide; Network Management
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-062
       Author: Simon, Barry
        Title: Diagnostic utilities -- Looking for the root of a problem?
               Not sure your PC is running optimally? These five packages
               let you test it, tune it, and fix it
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p175-180
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to five diagnostic utility
               programs for Windows 95 which not only report system
               resources but also diagnose and help remedy problems. Four
               of these programs are designed for use by sophisticated
               users or those who are responsible for troubleshooting
               someone else's PC. These programs were run on four test PCs
               which varied in complexity. The reporting and diagnostic
               portions of the programs were run to see if the program
               could correctly identify the configuration. The cleanup and
               tune-up functions of the programs were run to see what type
               of advice they offered. The accuracy of the programs varied
               widely. Several of the programs provided accurate and useful
               information but these initial Windows 95 versions need
               polishing. As a result, there is no "Editors' Choice."
               Includes one illustration, five screen displays, and one
               table.
Descriptor(s): Diagnostics; Problem-solving; Software Review; Window
               Software; Utility Program; Report Generator; Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-058
       Author: Seltzer, Larry
        Title: Memory utilities -- Under Windows 95, you may not need them
               often. But when you do, there's no alternative. We test the
               market leaders to see which...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p169-173
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to three memory management
               utilities. Notes that for most users, memory managers are
               unnecessary under Windows 95 except for running in MS-DOS
               mode which is required for compatibility with DOS
               applications which will not run under the protected-mode
               environment of Windows 95 (these are mainly games). A
               sidebar describes the results of reviews of five leading
               memory managers designed for use with Windows 3.1x reported
               in the February 20, 1996 issue. Includes a benchmark test
               comparing performance of the memory managers reviewed with
               that of Windows 95. Includes three screen displays, one
               illustration, and three graphs.
Descriptor(s): Memory; Management; Software Review; Window Software;
               Utility Program; Benchmark Testing; Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-053
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: File viewers
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p163-166
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Inso
 Product Name: Quick View Plus
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to four file viewers for use with
               Windows 95. These viewers support a wide variety of file
               formats but all have interfaces that are inconsistent,
               awkward, or both. Some support conversions between file
               types but full-scale conversions are not yet available for
               Windows 95. Not available for review was a combination of
               two products Adobe Systems has acquired from MasterSoft:
               Viewer 95 and Word for Word which will be sold as Adobe File
               Utilities for $149. Reviewer notes that Windows 95 includes
               Quick View which is a reduced version of Quick View Plus.
               Includes a buyer's guide comparing features of the viewers
               reviewed. Quick View Plus ($49), from Inso Corp., Chicago,
               IL (800, 312) is the "Editors' Choice." Includes one
               illustration, four screen displays, and one table.
Descriptor(s): Document Viewer; Disk Files; Software Review; Window
               Software; Conversions; Utility Program; Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-044
       Author: Rigney, Steve
        Title: Network antivirus solutions -- Here are eight packages that
               patrol for viruses on your NetWare server--and help you
               combat them
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p156-161
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Symantec
 Product Name: Norton AntiVirus for NetWare
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to eight anti-virus programs for
               NetWare servers. All eight of these programs alert when a
               virus attempts to enter the server, but only two of them
               offer cleaning or disinfection of viruses on the server
               (most do that at a client). Lists three reasons why it is a
               poor idea to disinfect on the server: false positives
               (deleting a clean file), performance (the network will slow
               down every time an NLM tries to disinfect a file), and
               safety (just because a program says a file is clean one
               should not trust it with data on the server). Norton
               AntiVirus for NetWare ($599 for a 10-user license) from
               Symantec Corp., Cupertino, CA (800) is the "Editors'
               Choice." Includes two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Utility Program; Software Review; NetWare Loadable
               Module; Local Area Networks; Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows; NetWare
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-034
       Author: Schultz, Keith
        Title: Antivirus utilities -- Missing from Windows 95's collection
               of utilities is an antivirus tool. For the ultimate in virus
               protection, choose from among...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p143-156
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Symantec
 Product Name: Norton AntiVirus for Windows 95
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to nine antivirus programs for
               Windows 95. All of these programs offer direct support for
               32-bit engines. None of the programs reviewed offers every
               feature the reviewer was looking for (prevention, detection,
               virus removal, performance, integration, and administration)
               but some came close. Windows 95's long filenames,
               compatibility problems with TSRs, and a major change in the
               way the system accessed boot sectors of floppy disks
               required almost complete rewrites of the programs' code to
               true 32-bit engines. A sidebar by Ben Z. Gottesman and Keith
               Schultz discusses macro viruses, new viruses that surfaced
               in 1995 which attach themselves to data files rather than to
               programs and boot sectors. Norton AntiVirus for Windows 95
               $79.95 from Symantec Corp., Cupertino, CA (800, 541) is the
               "Editors' Choice." Includes one illustration, two tables,
               and 10 screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Utility Program; Software Review; Window Software;
               Vendor Guide
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows 95; 386-based PC
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-030
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Uninstallers
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p135-141
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to three uninstaller programs for
               Windows 95. The purpose of these programs is to remove
               applications by removing the app itself, dynamic link
               library (DLL) files, and Visual Basic Extensions (VBXs) used
               only by the application. Some of these programs will also
               search and destroy data files created by the application.
               These programs currently are not able to know whether many
               DLL files are expendable or essential and two of them
               provide lists of "orphan" DLL files for possible removable.
               These three programs each have strengths and weaknesses but
               "none of them truly unwraps the uninstallation enigma to our
               satisfaction" so there is no "Editors' Choice." Includes one
               illustration, one table, and three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Disk Files; Utility Program; Software Review; Window
               Software; Vendor Guide; File Management
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows 95; IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-021
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Desktop enhancers -- If Windows 95's interface doesn't quite
               hit the mark for you, then take a close look at the various
               makeovers these desktop...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p115-132
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Symantec
 Product Name: Norton Navigator
     Abstract: Introduces reviews of eight desktop enhancers which can
               replace some or most of the features of the Windows 95
               interface. When Windows 3.x was the current operating
               system, PC Tools for Windows or Norton Desktop for Windows
               could entirely replace Program Manager. These enhancers do
               not totally replace the Explorer interface. A replacement
               for the Windows Explorer is available in Windows 95, which
               contains slightly improved versions of the Windows 3.x
               Program Manager and File Manager. This can replace Explorer
               if the user replaces the "shell=explorer.exe" line in
               SYSTEM.INI with "shell=progman.exe." The programs reviewed
               represent a good first effort but "the best Windows 95
               enhancements are probably yet to come." Norton Navigator
               ($99.95), from Symantec Corp., Cupertino, CA (800, 541) is
               the "Editors' Choice." Includes one illustration, eight
               screen displays, and one table.
Descriptor(s): Desktop Software; File Management; Software Review; Window
               Software; Utility Program
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows 95; IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-018
       Author: Rosch, Winn L
        Title: The basics -- Windows 95 lacks a few necessary tools. Here
               we look at the basic set of tools that will make your
               Windows 95 system more complete
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p107-111
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Microsoft; Symantec
 Product Name: Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95; Norton Utilities for Windows
               95
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to two basic utility packages for
               Windows 95. Notes that Windows 95 includes a number of
               utility functions including CHKDSK, DISKCOPY, FORMAT, FDISK,
               ATTRIB, and DOSKEY. Its Recycling Bin allows undelting
               files, ScanDisk can be used for normal disk maintenance,
               DriveSpace 2 offers disk compression, Microsoft Backup
               provides backup capabilities, and Microsoft Diagnostics aids
               in troubleshooting. The two packages reviewed add more
               features. They are Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95 ($54.95)
               from Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA (800, 206), and Norton
               Utilities for Windows 95 ($119) from Symantec Corp.,
               Cupertino, CA (800, 541). Includes one illustration and six
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Disk Files; Software Review; Window
               Software; Troubleshooting; Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI05-017
       Author: Ulanoff, Lance
        Title: The ultimate utility guide -- Work better and smarter by
               outfitting your PC with some of these 170 problem-solving
               tools
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1996) v15 n9 p100-219
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to utility programs including
               reviews of 170 programs in 14 categories. Includes "The
               basics" (p107-111) by Winn L. Rosch, "Desktop Enhancers"
               (p115-132) by Edward Mendelson, "Uninstallers" (p135-141) by
               Edward Mendelson, "Antivirus Utilities" (p143-156) and
               "Network Antivirus Solutions" (p156-161) by Keith Schultz,
               "File Viewers" (p163-166) by Edward Mendelson, "Memory
               Utilities" (p169-173) by Larry Seltzer, "Diagnostic
               Utilities" (p175-180) by Barry Simon, "Network Backup
               Utilities" (p181-186) by Steve Rigney, "More Essential
               Problem Solvers" (p187-190) by David Haskin, "OS/2
               Utilities" (p191-196) by Esther Schindler, "Internet
               Organizers" (p197-210) by Edward Mendelson, "Internet
               Plug-ins and Helpers" (p212-213), and "More Internet
               Utilities" (p215-219). In! cludes benchmark tests results.
               Includes eight tables, three graphs, 15 illustrations, and
               89 screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Software Review; Benchmark Testing; Vendor
               Guide
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI04-275
       Author: Deurbrouck, John
        Title: SCInvoke: screen savers on demand -- Control when your
               screen saver can and can't run
       Source: PC Magazine (April 23, 1996) v15 n8 p215-220
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Product Name: SCInvoke
     Abstract: Focuses on the use of SCInvoke, a Win32 executable file for
               controlling when your screen saver begins functioning.
               Explains that to invoke SCInvoke, you copy the SCINVOKE.EXE
               file to a subdirectory on your hard disk. Says this program
               presents a tiny dialog box, and you decide where on the
               screen you place SCInvoke. Attention is given to program
               options such as Always on Top, which causes SCInvoke to
               float above other windows even when it's not active;
               removing SCInvoke; and programming this screen saver.
               Discusses how to allow SCInvoke to start or prevent it from
               starting; placing the window at the same location on the
               screen, regardless of screen resolution; and how to move the
               window around the screen using client-area dragging.
               Includes one sidebar, two screen displays, and four code
               listings.
Descriptor(s): Screen Savers; Utility Program; Window Software; 32-Bit Code
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI04-235
       Author: Perenson, Melissa J
        Title: Fight back against Boza
       Source: PC Magazine (April 23, 1996) v15 n8 p80
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Command Software; IBM Corp.; McAfee Associates; S&S Software
               International; Symantec
 Product Name: F-PROT Professional for Windows 95; IBM AntiVirus;
               VirusScan; Dr. Solomon's AntiVirus Toolkit; Norton AntiVirus
               for Windows 95
     Abstract: Announces that various anti-virus programs have released
               updates that counter the Boza virus, which attacks 32-bit
               executable files and is the first Windows 95-specific virus
               to be isolated. Explains that Boza updates are available for
               IBM AntiVirus v2.4 ($NA) from IBM Corp. of Somers, NY (800);
               VirusScan ($NA) from McAfee Associates of Santa Clara, CA
               (800, 408); and Dr. Solomon's AntiVirus Toolkit ($NA) from
               S&S Software International Inc. of Burlington, MA (800,
               617). Similar Boza updates are included in Norton AntiVirus
               for Windows 95 ($NA) from Symantec Inc. of Cupertino, CA
               (800, 503); and ThunderByte Anti-Virus Utilities for Windows
               95 v7.0 ($NA) from ThunderByte Corp. of Massena, NY (800
               Notes that F-PROT Professional for Windows 95 ($170) from
               Comma Software of Jupiter, FL (800, 407) did not need any
               additio patches to deal with the Boza virus.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Utility Program; Window Software
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI03-265
       Author: Rawson, Tom
        Title: Find lost files and text with WSearch -- Add
               regular-expression searching to Windows and OS/2
       Source: PC Magazine (March 26, 1996) v15 n6 p213-222
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Product Name: WSearch
     Abstract: Presents a tutorial which outlines a file and text search
               utility, called WSearch, for Windows 3.1 and 95 and OS/2.
               Explains how the utility works and offers a program listing
               to add this capability to your applications. Notes that the
               tool supports wildcards in both the filename search and text
               string search fields. Includes a table listing character
               functions and examples of each, a diagram illustrating the
               compiler state machine, and a list of escape sequences
               recognized by WSearch. Includes one screen display and a
               program listing.
Descriptor(s): Disk Files; Information Retrieval; OS/2; Tutorial; Program
               Listing; Utility Program; Window Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI03-262
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: One for the little guys -- Three diminutive utilities that
               can save you a lot of work and frustration
       Source: PC Magazine (March 26, 1996) v15 n6 p201-202
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: Presents a tutorial which offers program listings for three
               small utilities which, although diminutive in size, are work
               savers, including: a TEE utility for DOS for redirecting and
               piping output; a detabbing utility for Windows 95 which
               converts tabs into spaces in text files; and a look at
               Partition Magic ($49.95) from PowerQuest (801), a neat
               little utility for creating partitions without disturbing
               your existing data. Notes that the program listing for the
               TEE utility is included while the detabbing utility is
               available for download. Includes a program listing and a
               screen display.
Descriptor(s): Operating Systems; Tutorial; Program Listing; Window
               Software; DOS; Utility Program; Disk Files
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI01-241
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: A cornucopia of utilities for Windows 95 and Windows NT --
               Windows 95 utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (January 23, 1996) v15 n2 p50-51
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to shareware and freeware utility
               programs for Windows 95 and Windows NT. Features 15 products
               available from either the Internet, the World Wide Web, or
               CompuServe. The following are available from CompuServe:
               Boot Manager 95 (Free for non-commercial use), Steve Flynn's
               DirSort utility ($19.95), Brian McCarty's TrayIcon ($5),
               Steve Saxon's WinGO ($20), Wedge Software's WinHacker 95
               ($10), and Nigel Thomas' WinBrowse ($15). Available from the
               Internet are: Firas El-Hasan's DOS Explore (Free), George
               Harth's Imp VWM ($15), WinTronix' KeepGoin' ($9), Sapphire's
               WinShade ($5), and Silicon Prairie Software's Zip Explorer
               ($29.95). Available from the World Wide Web & Internet are:
               ChaoSoft's Step-Up ($29.95), PowerToys (Free) from
               Microsoft's Web site, RTV Software's RTVReco (Free), and
               Microsoft's Control Panel applet (Free). Includes nine
               screen displays and 15 product summaries.
Descriptor(s): Window Software; Internet; World Wide Web; Utility Program;
               Shareware; Online Systems
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95; Microsoft Windows
               NT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI02-025
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Three OS/2 utilities packages bring Warp to warp speed
       Source: PC Magazine (February 6, 1996) v15 n3 p63
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Stardock Systems; Development Technologies; SofTouch Systems
 Product Name: Object Desktop; DeskMan/2; UniMaint
     Abstract: Presents a buyer's guide to three utilities packages for IBM
               PC compatibles running OS/2. These include Object Desktop
               ($99.95) from Stardock Systems (313), offering a fast,
               intuitive interface that can provide instant access to files
               while viewing any drive or directory, and which provides a
               caching option for speed, and a new editor. Considers
               DeskMan/2 ($79.95) from Development Technologies Inc. (803),
               called the most elegant and usable of all OS/2
               desktop-maintenance utilities, which allows you to preserve,
               modify, and restore anything from a single icon to
               everything on the desktop. Also covers UniMaint ($99.95)
               from SofTouch Systems Inc. (800, 405), which backs up
               multiple generations of the desktop and lets you copy all or
               part of the desktop to another computer. In addition, says
               that UniMaint provides good control over OS/2's internals,
               and lets you dig deep below OS/2's surface. Includes two
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): OS/2; Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Software Review; User
               Interface; Operating Systems
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI02-304
       Author: Dragan, Richard
        Title: Warp Cabinet: an OS/2 filer -- Copy, move, and rename files
               in OS/2 Warp with a File Manager-like window
       Source: PC Magazine (February 20, 1996) v15 n4 p223-226
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: Presents a tutorial for creating an OS/2 utility called Warp
               Cabinet, which allows users to copy, move, and rename files
               under a File Manager-type window. Provides samples of the
               C++ source code that runs Warp Cabinet, and offers the
               entire source code for free download. Notes that users will
               need Borland C++ for OS/2 v2.0 to compile the program.
               Explains how to use this handy utility, which has the look
               and feel of a Windows 3.1 File Manager window, but can also
               display multiple drives in one window like Windows 95
               Explorer. Includes five screen displays, two program
               listings, a list of PC Magazine's top ten utilities, and a
               sidebar that explains how to obtain copies of utility
               programs and summarizes the article on Warp Cabinet.
Descriptor(s): OS/2; Tutorial; Disk Files; Window Software; Utility
               Program; Program Listing; C Programming Language
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI02-297
       Author: Pietrek, Matt Seltzer, Larry
        Title: Windows 3.1 memory enhancement utilities -- The right
               utility can help you past major memory roadblocks in Windows
               3.1.
       Source: PC Magazine (February 20, 1996) v15 n4 p205-213
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Helix Software; Quarterdeck; Connectix; Syncronys Software
 Product Name: Hurricane; QEMM; MagnaRAM; RAM Doubler; SoftRAM95
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to memory enhancement utilities
               for Microsoft Windows 3.1. Features full reviews of four
               products: Hurricane v1.02 ($79.95) from Helix Software; QEMM
               8 ($70) and MagnaRAM2 ($40) from Quarterdeck Corp.; RAM
               Doubler v1.02 ($99) from Connectix; and SoftRAM96 v2.00
               ($79.95) from Syncronys Software. Rates Hurricane v1.02 as
               the best of these solutions, awarding it PC Magazine's
               Editors' Choice award. Includes four graphs that compare
               speed increases on machines running various programs under
               8MB and 16MB of RAM and one graph that compares the
               products' RAM compression rates. Includes five screen
               displays and a sidebar.
Descriptor(s): Memory; Utility Program; Window Software; Vendor Guide;
               Software Review
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: A B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 96PI02-210
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Windows 95 antivirus utilities: the latest in PC protection
       Source: PC Magazine (February 20, 1996) v15 n4 p39-41
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: S&S Software International; Symantec; TouchStone Software;
               ThunderByte TCT International; McAfee Associates
 Product Name: Dr. Solomon's Anti-Virus Toolkit for Windows 95; Norton
               AntiVirus for Windows 95; PC-cillin 95; ThunderByte
               Anti-Virus Utilities Professional Version for Windows 95;
               VirusScan for Windows 95
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to antivirus utility programs for
               Microsoft Windows 95. Includes capsule reviews of Dr.
               Solomon's Anti-Virus Toolkit for Windows 95 ($125) from S&S
               Software International Inc.; Norton Antivirus for Windows 95
               ($79.95) from Symantec Inc.; PC-cillin 95 v1.0 ($49.95) from
               TouchStone Software Corp.; ThunderByte Anti-Virus Utilities
               Professional Version for Windows 95 ($149.95) from
               ThunderByte TCT International Corp.; and VirusScan for
               Windows 95 ($65) from McAfee Associates Inc. Reveals that
               all of these programs do a great job of virus detecting, but
               maintains that ThunderByte Anti-Virus and PC-Cillin scanned
               the hard drive the fastest in testing. Includes five screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Window Software; Utility Program; Disk Files; Vendor
               Guide; Hard Disk Drive; Software Review
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95
        Grade: B B B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 96PL02-009
       Author: Mann, Richard
        Title: Take it off: uninstaller programs -- Unwanted Windows
               programs can clog up your hard drive by depositing files in
               a myriad of locations. That's where a dedicated...
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (February 1, 1996) v8 n2 p58-60
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Quarterdeck; Vertisoft Systems; MicroHelp
 Product Name: CleanSweep 95; Remove-IT; Uninstaller
     Abstract: Presents a comparative review of three uninstall programs
               for Windows. Compares three products from three companies,
               including: CleanSweep 95 ($29.95) from Quarterdeck Corp. of
               Marina Del Ray, CA (800, 310); Remove-IT v2.0 ($69.95) from
               Vertisoft Systems Inc. of San Francisco, CA (800, 415); and
               Uninstaller v3.0 ($79.95) from MicroHelp Inc. of Marietta,
               GA (800, 404). Notes that only CleanSweep 95 comes in 32-bit
               code, and adds that the reviewer awaits Windows 95 versions
               of the last two products. Says that Remove-IT seems the
               better program, and praises its runtime unarchiver, faster
               operation, and ability to remove entire program groups at
               once. Includes three photos, one screen display, one chart,
               and a product source guide.
Descriptor(s): Disk Files; Window Software; Software Review; Utility
               Program
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows; Microsoft Windows 95
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI11-235
       Author: Ulanoff, Lance
        Title: Windows 95 utilities: picking up the pieces -- Fear not,
               vendors are already rushing to provide the missing pieces
               for the Windows 95 utilities puzzle.
       Source: PC Magazine (November 21, 1995) v14 n20 p157-203
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Symantec; Microsoft
 Product Name: Norton Navigator for Windows 95, The; DriveSpace 3
     Abstract: Presents reviews of 11 utility programs for Windows 95.
               Includes two desktop managers, two hard disk compression
               programs, four antivirus packages, and three backup
               programs. A table compares the features of these programs
               with those included in Windows 95 and those in Microsoft
               Plus. Windows 95 offers little in the way of virus detection
               and backup, so this market is expected to grow as third
               party vendors bring the offerings to market. The reviews
               indicate that utilities development efforts for Windows 95
               are still ongoing, but "whether all these categories can
               remain viable u the new operating system remains to be
               seen." "Editors' Choice honors were given to Norton
               Navigator ($99), a desktop manager fr Symantec Corp.,
               Cupertino, CA (800, 503) and DriveSpace 3 ($49) from
               Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA (800, 206) a hard disk
               compressio program. Includes a benchmark test. Includes two
               graphs, one illustration,! 30 screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Software Review; Window Software; Benchmark
               Testing
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI12-314
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Unzipping files the Windows 95 way -- A shell extension
               shows you what's in your .ZIP files and unzips them
       Source: PC Magazine (December 19, 1995) v14 n22 p255-264
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Product Name: ZipView
     Abstract: PC TECH/UTILITIES column describes ZipView, a Windows 95
               property-sheet shell extension that adds a Contents page to
               the property sheets of .ZIP files, allowing you to see what
               is in a .ZIP file without using an application as a
               middleman. Explains that ZipView also demonstrates: how to
               write property-sheet shell extensions, how to use Windows
               95's new ListView control, how Win32 applications can spawn
               synchronous child processes, and how to use the Registry to
               save and restore program settings. Attention is given to:
               how to install and use ZipView, uninstalling ZipView,
               property-sheet shell extensions as DLLs housing a component
               object that meets the specifications of the Component Object
               Model upon which OLE is based, and extracting files with
               ZipView. Notes that ZipView and its C++ source code is
               available online from PC Magazine. Includes three code
               listings, three screen displays, and one sidebar.
Descriptor(s): Disk Files; Utility Program; Compression; Window Software;
               Software Tools
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI12-245
       Author: Machrone, Bill
        Title: Taming the PC Card memory monster
       Source: PC Magazine (December 19, 1995) v14 n22 p85
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: Practical Peripherals; Zoom Telephonics
 Product Name: PCONFIG; Practical Peripherals PC288T2; ENABLE
     Abstract: Describes configuration programs for turning on a modem that
               save the memory overhead of PC Card services software.
               Explains that most PC Card modems include configuration
               software, such as the PCONFIG that comes with the Practical
               Peripherals PC288T2, that requires you to set up a 2KB
               excluded block in high memory, used for communicating with
               the modem. Indicates that using PCONFIG provides the author
               with 81KB more memory and that Zoom's ENABLE utility is
               quite similar. However, notes that you need to remove lines
               from SYSTEM.INI, edit the CONFIG.SYS file, and make
               adjustments to your memory management utility, if you have
               one. Also says that your PC Card slots or modem may not come
               back to life after a suspend-resume cycle, and not all
               laptops benefit from these programs.
Descriptor(s): PCMCIA; Lap-sized Microcomputer; Modem; Utility Program;
               Memory
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI12-231
       Author: Perenson, Melissa J
        Title: PowerDesk: a powerful utility
       Source: PC Magazine (December 19, 1995) v14 n22 p61
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: MicroHelp
 Product Name: PowerDesk
     Abstract: Announces the release of PowerDesk ($40), a file manager
               from MicroHelp Inc. of Marietta, GA (800, 770). Runs on IBM
               PC compatibles with Windows 95. Explains that this utility
               has a great degree of customization, and it provides instant
               access to Windows 95's shutdown and system controls,
               integration with the Taskbar, and easy-to-maneuver,
               single-layer pop-up menus. Indicates that PowerDesk includes
               the DOS command line in its toolbar, and its Explorer Plus
               allows you to view multiple drives simultaneously and allows
               automatic decompression of zipped files when they are
               dragged-and-dropped. Other features include the ability to
               resize the PowerDesk toolbar and to have
               multiple-application QuickLaunch pads within the same
               toolbar for single-click access to programs. Includes one
               screen display.
Descriptor(s): User Interface; Utility Program; Window Software; Software
               Review
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 95PL12-011
       Author: Leyenberger, Arthur
        Title: Laptop office
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (December 1, 1995) v7 n12
               p87-88
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Cirque; Merritt Computer Products; Woods Wire Products;
               Software Architects
 Product Name: GlidePoint; Mouse2Go; TravelSurge; Here & Now
     Abstract: LAPTOP OFFICE column presents a buyers' guide to a utility
               programs and three laptop peripherals. Features capsule
               reviews of four products from four companies: the GlidePoint
               ($89) pointing device from Cirque of Salt Lake City, UT
               (801) which provides for improved cursor control; the
               Mouse2Go ($60) from Meritt Computer Products of Dallas, TX
               (214) which combines a short cord, high-resolution,
               two-button mouse with a special pad that attaches to either
               side of a portable computer; the TravelSurge ($20) surge
               protector from Woods Wire Products of Carmel, IN (800); and
               Here & Now ($90) from Software Architects of Bothell, WA
               (206) which can run under DOS or Windows to enable a
               portable PC to read Macintosh disks directly. Includes three
               photos and a product resource guide.
Descriptor(s): Lap-sized Microcomputer; Peripherals; Vendor Guide; Pointing
               Devices; Power Supply; Utility Program; Interoperability
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: B B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 95PL11-012
       Author: Yacco, Wayne
        Title: Software odyssey
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (November 1, 1995) v7 n11
               p92-94
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Vertisoft Systems; PowerQuest; V Communications
 Product Name: Name-It; PartitionMagic for DOS/Windows; System Commander
     Abstract: SOFTWARE ODYSSEY column presents a buyers' guide to utility
               programs for Windows 95. Features capsule reviews of three
               products from three companies: PartitionMagic for
               DOS/Windows ($49.95) from PowerQuest of Orem, UT (800) which
               enables isolating Windows 95 in its own partition to limit
               problems with installing a new OS; System Commander ($99.95)
               from V Communications of San Jose, CA (800, 408) which
               install as a master boot record to handle any operating
               system that runs of a PC and supports multiple operating
               system in a single partition; and Name-It ($29.95) from
               Vertisoft Systems of San Francisco, CA (800, 415) which
               resides in the background to enable facilitates finding
               16-bit application files with a long name without a
               reduction in functionality. Includes a screen display, two
               photos, a drawing, and a product resource guide.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Vendor Guide; 32-Bit Code; Window Software;
               Software Review
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows 95
        Grade: B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 95PL12-009
       Author: Cahlin, Michael
        Title: Stand out shareware -- Looking to make your Windows notebook
               run a little better-or add functionality? From powerful
               calculators to file viewers, ...
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (December 1, 1995) v7 n12
               p64-66
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to Windows-based shareware.
               Features capsule descriptions of 14 products from 14
               companies. Includes fee and vendor contact information as
               well as online addresses. Says shareware are also available
               through CD-ROMs and user groups that maintain shareware
               libraries. Includes 14 summary cards and two screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Shareware; Vendor Guide; Utility Program; Window Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 95PL10-007
       Author: Roth, Cliff
        Title: Going remote: Remote access software -- With remote access
               software and a modem, laptop users can access their desktop
               PC's to remotely run programs and use resources.
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (October 1, 1995) v7 n10 p46-50
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Triton Technologies; Symantec; Microcom; Traveling Software
 Product Name: CoSession for Windows; PC Anywhere for Windows; PC Anywhere
               for DOS; Carbon Copy for Windows; LapLink for Windows
     Abstract: Introduces a buyer's guide to five remote access software
               packages (four for Windows and one for DOS). Includes a
               discussion of the essential elements of and the problems
               likely to be encountered with remote computing. Provides
               individual reviews of: CoSession for Windows v2.0 ($99) from
               Triton Technologies (908); PC Anywhere for Windows v2.0
               ($129) from Symantec (408); PC Anywhere for DOS v5.0 ($179)
               from Symantec (408); Carbon Copy for Windows v3.0 ($120)
               from Microcom (617); and LapLink for Windows v6.0a ($199)
               from Traveling Software (800). Recommends CoSession for its
               low-impact installation procedure and LapLink for its
               multiple capabilities and the included high speed parallel
               connection cable. Includes four photographs and four screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Remote Computing; Software Tools; Vendor Guide; Utility
               Program; Window Software; DOS; Lap-sized Microcomputer
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows; DOS
        Grade: B B C B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 95PL02-009
       Author: Yacco, Wayne
        Title: File-transfer feud: LapLink vs. WinLynx
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (February 1, 1995) v7 n2 p82-83
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Rupp Technology; Traveling Software
 Product Name: WinLynx for Windows; LapLink for Windows
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to file-transfer programs. Features
               a comparative review of two Windows-based programs from two
               companies. Products reviewed are: WinLynx v3.0 for Windows
               ($169) from Rupp Technology Corp. of Phoenix, AZ (602) which
               offers superior support for DOS operations, requires fewer
               system resources, and provides a file searcher and viewer;
               and LapLink v6.0 for Windows ($199) from Traveling Software
               of Bothell, WA (800) which offers remote-control
               capabilities, can reduce connect time, and is "the most
               comprehensive file-transfer product you can buy." Includes
               two photos and a product resource guide.
Descriptor(s): Data Transmission; Vendor Guide; Remote Computing; Window
               Software; Utility Program; Disk Files
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 95PL02-011
       Author: Yacco, Wayne
        Title: Software Odyssey
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (February 1, 1995) v7 n2 p88-89
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Ocean Isle; Quarterdeck Office Systems
 Product Name: Reachout Remote Control Pro Edition; QEMM
     Abstract: SOFTWARE ODYSSEY column reviews two mobile computing
               programs. Features capsule reviews of two products from two
               companies. Products reviewed are: Reachout Remote Control
               Pro Edition v4.01 ($199 for modem version) from Ocean Isle
               of Vero Beach, FL (407) which offers "completely versatile"
               remote-access capabilities; and QEMM v7.5 ($99.95) memory
               manager from Quarterdeck Office Systems Inc. of Santa
               Monica, CA (800, 310) which provides increased support for
               popular laptops and can also help to avoid conflict with
               memory addresses used by PC Cards. Includes a screen
               display, a photo, and a product resource guide.
Descriptor(s): Mobile Computing; Vendor Guide; Remote Computing; Memory;
               Utility Program; Lap-sized Microcomputer
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI10-105
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: Launch as you like it -- Launch Windows programs minimized,
               maximized...however you want.
       Source: PC Magazine (October 10, 1995) v14 n17 p523-544
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: Microsoft
 Product Name: Microsoft Windows
     Abstract: Presents a tutorial on the use of a utility for Windows
               called LaunchControl, which enables control over how DOS and
               Windows applications are launched under Windows 3.1.
               Explains how the executable works, how to install and use
               it, and looks at the techniques used to implement its
               various functions. Includes information on where to download
               both the executable and the source code for LaunchControl.
               Includes one screen display, two program listings, a list of
               top 10 utilities, and a sidebar guide to PC Magazine's
               utilities.
Descriptor(s): Window Software; Utility Program; Programming Instruction;
               Tutorial; Program Listing; DOS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI10-100
       Author: Rigney, Steve
        Title: The long and the short of Windows 95 filenames -- Before you
               reap the benefits of long filenames, you need to investigate
               their pitfalls.
       Source: PC Magazine (October 10, 1995) v14 n17 p369-370
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: Microsoft
 Product Name: Microsoft Windows 95
     Abstract: Presents a tutorial on the use of the extended filename
               enabled by Windows 95. Discusses the limitations of the VFAT
               file system and the problems caused when a 16-bit
               application accesses a file with an extended filename.
               Explains how to create extended filenames noting that the
               process can be difficult), how networks react to long
               filenames, and the limitations you may encounter when using
               backup and disk utilities. Concludes that until most
               applications are available in Windows 95 versions, the use
               of long filenames will remain risky, at best. Includes one
               screen display.
Descriptor(s): Window Software; Disk Files; 32-Bit Code; Utility Program;
               Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI09-149
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: QEMM 8
       Source: PC Magazine (September 12, 1995) v14 n15 p258
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Quarterdeck Office Systems
 Product Name: QEMM 8
     Abstract: Announces QEMM 8 ($NA), a memory management utility from
               Quarterdeck Office Systems. This version will increase
               available RAM for DOS applications and drivers under Windows
               95. Windows 3.x users will benefit from increased resources.
Descriptor(s): Memory; Product Announcement; Window Software; Management;
               Utility Program
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI09-148
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Dashboard 95
       Source: PC Magazine (September 12, 1995) v14 n15 p258
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Starfish Software
 Product Name: Dashboard 95
     Abstract: Announces Dashboard 95 ($49.95), a Windows 95 shell from
               Starfish Software (800). The program will ship concurrently
               with Windows 95. It replaces Windows 95's Taskbar with
               compact and efficient program and printer-management
               features.
Descriptor(s): User Interface; Product Announcement; Window Software;
               Utility Program
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI09-146
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Arcada Backup for Windows 95
       Source: PC Magazine (September 12, 1995) v14 n15 p258
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Arcada Software
 Product Name: Arcada Backup for Windows 95
     Abstract: Announces Arcada Backup for Windows 95 ($99), a backup
               utility from Arcada Software (407). Unlike the backup
               software that is included in Windows 95, which works only
               with QIC tape drives and disks, this program supports those
               formats as well as SCSI tape, and provides Wizards to aid in
               automating backups.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Product Announcement; Window Software; Utility
               Program
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI06-076
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Change a program's address with COA
       Source: PC Magazine (June 13, 1995) v14 n11 p273-282
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Company Name: Neil J. Rubenking
 Product Name: Change of Address
     Abstract: PCTech UTILITIES column presents a PASCAL language program
               listing, Change of Address (COA), a utility program that
               effectively sends change-of-address notices regarding
               application programs, to Windows. Explains that COA will
               change one address string to another address string in the
               .GRP and .INI files, and in the registration database. Notes
               that COA is a Multiple Document Interface program which
               includes a File List window, Find and Replace window, and a
               Registration Database viewer window. Indicates that the
               items in the main window's Options menu control how COA
               searches for and replaces text. Covers how to edit .GRP and
               .INI files with COA, and states that Windows provides
               numerous specialized API functions for reading and changing
               the registration database. This file is available separately
               on-line from ZiffNet's PC MagNet; sidebar describes how to
               obtain COA and how to join ZiffNet. Includes three program
               listings ! and four screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Window Software; Pascal; Programming Instruction; Utility
               Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 95PL03-008
       Author: Mann, Richard O
        Title: Organizing your finances
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (March 1, 1995) v7 n3 p52-57
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Intuit; Meca Software; 4Home Productions; Microsoft
 Product Name: Quicken; Managing Your Money; Kiplinger's Simply Money;
               Microsoft Money; TurboTax
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to personal-finance and
               tax-preparation software for IBM PC compatibles. Provides
               capsule reviews of four personal-finance programs: Quicken
               for DOS/Windows ($39.99) from Intuit, Inc. of Menlo Park, CA
               (800, 415); Managing Your Money for DOS/Windows ($40) from
               Meca Software of Fairfield, CT (800); Kiplinger Simply Money
               v2.0 ($35) from 4Home Productions of Islandia, NY (800,
               516); and Microsoft Money v3.0 ($14.95) from Microsoft of
               Redmond, WA (206). Also provides capsule reviews of three
               tax-preparation software: TurboTax for DOS/Windows ($35) fro
               Intuit, Inc.; TaxCut for DOS/Windows ($40) from Meca Softwa
               Simply Tax ($35) from 4Home Productions. Concludes that
               Quicken TurboTax are the best in the business although
               Managing Your Mon and TaxCut both offer intelligent advice.
               Contains five photos and seven screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Finances; Taxes; Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Software
               Review; Window Software; Accounting
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A B B B A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI05-306
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: Save the desktop!
       Source: PC Magazine (May 30, 1995) v14 n10 p270-274
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
     Abstract: Presents a tutorial for using a free utility called SaveIt,
               which scans the windows on the desktop to determine which
               programs are running. Says the program and source code files
               are available for download from PC Magazine's PC MagNet and
               require a C compiler compatible with Microsoft C or Borland
               C++. Explains how to use SaveIt and examines the program's
               design. Includes a list of PC Magazine's top ten free
               utilities, one screen display, several programming examples,
               a screen capture of the layout of the structures in the
               Group file format, and a guide to PC Magazines utilities and
               how to get them.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Desktop Software; C Programming Language;
               Program Listing; Shareware
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI12-041
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: Raiders of the lost DLL
       Source: PC Magazine (December 6, 1994) v13 n21 p367-368+
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Product Name: FDDLLS
     Abstract: Describes Find Dead Dynamic Link Libraries (FDDLL) (0), a
               utility program from PC Magazine that scans a hard disk for
               DLLs and the programs that put them there. Details how to
               download and install FDDLL in a system, the FDDLL scanning
               phases, and the order in which Windows searches for DLLs.
               Defines DLLs and its advantages in microcomputing. Explains
               how to determine appropriate DLLs for a Windows program.
               Lists the offsets under the New Executable format header.
               Points out several types of false flags that are encountered
               in the deletion of DLLs. Contains the sidebar "Guide to Our
               Utilities & How to Get Them" (p376).. Includes two tables
               and a sidebar.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Library; Management; Hard Disk Drive;
               Window Software; Disk Files
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI03-289
       Author: McSorley, John
        Title: 1MBFort protects low memory
       Source: PC Magazine (March 28, 1995) v14 n6 p283-294
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: 1MBFort; View1MB
     Abstract: UTILITIES column discusses 1MB Fort (free) written in C, and
               View1MB (free) written in Visual Basic, Windows utilities
               available from PC Magazine. Says 1MB Fort can be used to
               build a fortress to protect low memory. Adds that View1MB is
               a companion to 1MB Fort and it can be used to check on low
               memory. Explains how to check memory with View1MB; how to
               use 1MBFort; identifying the problem; and inside 1MBFort.
               Includes a guide to PC Magazine utilities and how to get
               them; and program listings for 1MB Fort and View1MB.
               Includes two screen displays, one diagram, two sidebars, and
               one program listing.
Descriptor(s): Memory; Utility Program; Window Software
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI02-271
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: Kick-start programs with DropKick
       Source: PC Magazine (February 21, 1995) v14 n4 p254-258
    Pub. Type: Column
 Company Name: PCMagNet
 Product Name: DropKick
     Abstract: UTILITIES column describes DropKick, a Windows 3.1 utility
               that launches Windows programs by clicking the mouse button.
               Explains that the user can add a program to the DropKick
               menu by dragging the file's icon from the File Manager to
               the DropKick window. Notes that DropKick's menu is
               configurable, and installation is very simple. Provides
               details of DropKick's usage, including its Add button and
               Run Minimized check box. Indicates that the DropKick window
               is implemented by means of a dialog box, thus freeing the
               program from having to create child windows. Notes that
               DropKick's DragQueryFile function returns the number of
               files dropped on the window, and determines the names of
               files. Also reports that DropKick launches programs using
               the ShellExecute function. Concludes that DropKick is a
               modern, context-sensitive menu that can easily be added to
               the Windows program. This program is available on-line from
               PCMagNet. Include! s two code listings, one screen display,
               and one table.
Descriptor(s): User Interface; Window Software; Desktop Software; Disk
               Files; Utility Program
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI02-232
        Title: Symantec makes the missing link
       Source: PC Magazine (February 21, 1995) v14 n4 p61
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Symantec
 Product Name: ACT! Link
     Abstract: Reports that Symantec Corp. of Cupertino, CA (800, 503) has
               announced the release of ACT! Link ($299), an add-on for the
               company's ACT! for Windows contact manager. Runs on IBM PC
               compatibles with Windows. Explains that ACT! Link enables
               ACT! for Windows to communicate remotely with a central ACT!
               database. Changes to the database are sent to, and
               incorporated with, the central database, and new updates are
               automatically sent by di in. Features include the ACT! Mail
               feature for making ACT! Link an e-mail package and security
               options for screening files from unauthorized users.
Descriptor(s): Contact Manager; Utility Program; Remote Computing; Window
               Software; Add-on
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows; Act! for Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 94PL12-001
       Author: Rohan, Rebecca
        Title: Software short takes
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (December 1, 1994) v6 n12 p12
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to utility software for IBM PC
               compatibles. Provides brief descriptions and capsule reviews
               of six products from six companies. Rates the products on a
               scale of one to five points with five being the highest
               score. States the products' hardware and software
               requirements. Gives the address and telephone number of the
               products' distributor. Includes six photos and six summary
               cards.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Software Review
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI03-021
       Author: Mace, Thomas Simon, Barry
        Title: Why wait? Get more from Windows now! -- Today's Windows
               utilities offer the interface that Windows never had -- and
               that upgrades can only promise.
       Source: PC Magazine (March 14, 1995) v14 n5 p108-166
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Borland International; Central Point Software; Wesson
               International; Systems Compatibility
 Product Name: Dashboard; PC Tools for Windows; Praxim; Outside In for
               Windows; XTree Gold for Windows
     Abstract: Presents reviews of 35 Windows utilities. Although many of
               the features of the utilities reviewed are expected to be
               incorporated in Windows 95, scheduled for release later this
               year, these utilities can provide improved performance now.
               Windows deficiencies addressed by these utilities are the
               fact that Program Manager groups can't be nested within
               other groups and there are no virtual desktops; File Manager
               lacks compression, encryption, and undelete; and File
               Manager searches are limited to path- and wildcard-based
               searches, there is no capability of searching for file
               content. Sidebars describe OS/2 Warp as an alternative
               interface, File Manager enhancements, and utilities for
               dealing with zipped files. Dashboard 20 ($49.95), PC Tools
               for Windows 2.0 ($179), Praxim 1.0 ($39.95), Outside In/for
               Windows ($89) 2.1H, and XTree Gold for Windows 4.0 ($99.95)
               are "Editors' Choice." Includes 34 screen displays, three !
               tables.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Software Review; Window Software; Software
               Review
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: A A A A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 95PI02-042
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: A calculator with "paper tape"
       Source: PC Magazine (February 7, 1995) v14 n3 p273-278
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: Microsoft
 Product Name: TapeCalc
     Abstract: Discusses TapeCalc, a Microsoft Windows utility calculator
               program. Says TapeCalc is designed for real-world tasks, and
               keeps a record of calculations on a simulated paper tape.
               Explains how to use TapeCalc; its operators, both binary
               (addition, subtraction, division, multiplication, power) and
               unary (square root and reciprocal); and its memory. Adds
               that TapeCalc can be programmed, and more operators and
               functions can be added as needed. Includes sidebars on the
               top 10 utilities and how to access utilities f Magazines
               online service, the PC MagNet. Includes three sidebars, two
               screen displays, and a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Calculator; Utility Program; Window Software; Program
               Listing
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 94PL09-001
        Title: Software short takes
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (September 1, 1994) v6 n9 p10
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to software to IBM PC Compatibles.
               Products reviewed and overall ratings (out of five) are:
               Remind Me ($50) from Velocity Development (800) - 5.0;
               Disney Collection Screen Saver ($50) from Berkeley Systems
               Inc. (510) - 5.0; Timeless Hints from Heloise ($40) from
               Lifestyle Software Group (800) - 4.0; Professional Write
               ($249) from SPC Software Publishing Corp. (800) - 3.0;
               Jonathan Pond's Personal Financial Planner ($50) from
               Vertigo Development Group - 4.0; and Real Estate Lawyer
               ($90) from Z-LAW Software Inc. (800) - 2.0. States the
               hardware requirements of each product. Includes six photos,
               and six summary cards.
Descriptor(s): Software; Vendor Guide; Consumer Information; Productivity
               Software; Utility Program; Word Processing; Real Estate
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 94PL11-006
       Author: Cahlin, Michael
        Title: Power Windows -- Wish you could customize Windows to the way
               you work? Our 14 Most Valuable Utility Players will make
               Windows run like a champ on ...
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (November 1, 1994) v6 n11
               p48-50
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to Windows-based software
               utilities. Provides individual summaries of 15 products from
               15 companies in the following categories: envelope
               addressing; font manager; icon editor; alternatives to the
               Program Manager; screen savers; uninstallation software; fax
               software; file compression. Says that power and versatility
               can be added to Windows through the use of the software and
               utilities which were reviewed. Also says that utilities
               typically require an 80386 or higher processor; 4MB of RAM;
               a VGA display; and Windows v3.1. Adds that Windows can also
               be customized according to the preferences of a user.
               Includes three screen displays, and two photos.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Window Software; Software
               Tools; Consumer Information
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 94PL08-013
       Author: Rohan, Rebecca
        Title: Software short takes
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (August 1, 1994) v6 n8 p18
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to software for IBM PC compatibles.
               Features individual summaries of six products from six
               manufacturers. Products reviewed and overall ratings (out of
               five) are: HeartLight PC ($23) from Epic MegaGames of
               Rockville, MD (800) - 4.0; The Family Circle Cookbook: New
               Tastes for New Times ($39) from Pinpoint Publishing (707) -
               4.0; Easy Notebook Of from Apsley-Bolton Computers Inc.
               (800) - 2.0; WinCom Pro ($129) from Delrina Corp. (800) -
               4.0; HomeOwnership Plus ($69) from Personal Vision of South
               Dennis, MA (800); and Norton DiskLock 3.0 for Windows ($129)
               - 4.0. Includes six photos, and six summary cards.
Descriptor(s): Software; Vendor Guide; Software Review; Utility Program;
               Games; Consumer Information
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 94PL10-008
       Author: Mann, Richard O
        Title: Keeping data safe -- Protecting data from unknown disasters
               is easy--if you prepare. Richard takes a look at some ways
               to keep your data safe
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (October 1, 1994) v6 n10 p58-60
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
  Standard No: 1043-1314
     Abstract: Presents an overview of ways to protect data. Details steps
               for minimizing data loss caused by hard disk failures:
               making backup copies of files; using DOS utilities for hard
               disk maintenance. Provides brief descriptions of software
               utilities and computer peripherals for protecting data,
               including: removable hard disk drives; encryption programs;
               password protection programs; programs for limiting user
               access; utilities for recovering lost computers. Says that
               data loss cannot be prevented, but it's impact can be
               lessened through the use of utilities and by making backup
               copies of files. Includes a photo.
Descriptor(s): Security; Consumer Information; Utility Program; Software
               Tools; Information Storage
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 94PL11-013
       Author: Rohan, Rebecca
        Title: MosesDOCK!
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (November 1, 1994) v6 n11 p78
    Pub. Type: Hardware Review
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Moses Computers
 Product Name: MosesDOCK!
     Abstract: Presents a very favorable review of MosesDOCK! ($299), a
               package for connecting a notebook to a desktop computer from
               Moses Computers of Los Gatos, CA (800). Runs on IBM PC
               Compatibles with DOS 3.3 or higher, and an 8-bit expansion
               slot. Features a network card for the desktop; a lightweight
               external adapter for the parallel port in notebooks; and a
               cable to connect the adapter and card. Says that the
               dual-port card can be used to accommodate up to eight
               stations; and that the four-port card can accommodate up to
               74 stations. Adds that installation is simple, but
               configuring the terminals requires some technical knowledge.
               Concludes that it enables users to share resources. Includes
               a photo, and a summary card.
Descriptor(s): Lap-sized Microcomputer; Hardware Review; Utility Program;
               Peripherals; Data Transmission
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 94PL10-005
       Author: Preuss, Frank Roth, Cliff
        Title: Software suites -- Software suites offer high-power business
               programs at bargain prices. We put the Lotus, Microsoft and
               Borland/WordPerfect ...
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (October 1, 1994) v6 n10
               p42-47, 64
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Microsoft; Lotus Development; Borland International
 Product Name: Microsoft Office; Lotus SmartSuite; Borland Office
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to software suites. Features a
               table comparing five specifications of three products from
               three companies. Includes price of the suite, and of the
               individual programs; and suite product requirements.
               Products reviewed include Microsoft Office v4.3 Professional
               Edition ($899) from Microsoft Corp. of Redmond, WA (206);
               Lotus SmartSuite v2.1 ($795) from Lotus Development Corp. of
               Cambridge, MA (617); and Borland Office v2.0 (595) from
               Borland Corp. of Scotts Valley, CA (408). Gives tips for
               purchasing software suites. Includes three photos, two
               screen displays, and a table.
Descriptor(s): Integrated Software; Vendor Guide; Software Review; Consumer
               Information; Utility Program
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A B C
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 94PL11-005
       Author: Atlas, Jay David
        Title: Do it in DOS -- Do you really need Windows to get your work
               done? Professor Atlas takes a contrary view
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (November 1, 1994) v6 n11
               p40-45
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to DOS-based software. Features a
               table comparing three specifications of 13 products from 11
               companies. Describes DOS-based word processors;
               spreadsheets; databases. Compares DOS-based programs to
               Windows versions. Says that DOS is still a good alternative
               for laptop users who can't afford to use Windows. Adds that
               DOS programs are still widely used compared to Windows
               versions. Contains the sidebars "Using DOS" (p42) which
               discusses the basic DOS commands and "Is DOS Really Dead?"
               (p45) which covers the use of DOS-based programs. Includes
               two photos, and two tables.
Descriptor(s): Software; Vendor Guide; Utility Program; DOS; Consumer
               Information; Lap-sized Microcomputer
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI11-255
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: Back to the future with PCMKEY
       Source: PC Magazine (November 22, 1994) v13 n20 p319-328
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: UTILITIES column discusses PCMKEY, a command line editor.
               Says with PCMKEY, editing functions can be assigned to any
               key on the keyboard. Adds that it allows environment
               variables in aliases, provides intelligent command stacking,
               and supports reassignable keys. Provides a sidebar "Guide to
               Our Utilities & How to Get Them." Notes that PCMKEY is
               written in assembly language. Topics covered include how to
               use PCMKEY, assigning aliases, command line switches, code
               used to write PCMKEY, Windows compatibility, PCMKEY
               enhancements. Includes one program listing and four tables.
Descriptor(s): Editor; Utility Program; Assembly Language; User Interface
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI11-253
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: The STACKS command revisited
       Source: PC Magazine (November 22, 1994) v13 n20 p307-312
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: TUTOR column discusses the STACKS setting in DOS for a PC.
               Says STACKS is a command in DOS 3.2 and later that
               intercepts selected hardware interrupts and provides stack
               space from an internal stack pool. Adds that the default
               setting of STACKS=9,128 (or 9 stacks of 128 bytes each)
               consumes almost 2K of conventional memory, and that another
               setting might be better, such as STACKS=0,0. Notes that if
               STACKS is set to a nonzero value and the number of nested
               hardware interrupts exceeds the number of specified stacks,
               the system is liable to crash. Reports on the STACKMON and
               STACKCHK utilities to determine the optimum stack size.
               Includes one debug script and two data printouts.
Descriptor(s): DOS; Tutorial; Memory; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI11-206
       Author: Caster, Kathleen
        Title: DCI: the secret to digital video speed
       Source: PC Magazine (November 22, 1994) v13 n20 p31
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: Intel Corp.; Microsoft
 Product Name: Display Control Interface
     Abstract: Discusses a device driver called Display Control Interface
               (DCI), developed by Intel and Microsoft which runs Windows
               applications faster and speeds up video playback. Says the
               DCI works as an arbitrator by moving certain graphics and
               video-intensive jobs away from the CPU and onto the graphics
               card. Notes that the graphics drivers and operating system
               must be DCI-enabled, though most application programs do not
               require it. Includes one flow chart.
Descriptor(s): Graphics; Utility Program; Accelerator; Window Software;
               Digital Video; Speed
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI11-008
       Author: Olsen, J W
        Title: Keep Windows healthy with these six problem solvers
       Source: PC Magazine (November 8, 1994) v13 n19 p37-39
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Touchstone Software; Landmark Research International;
               CyberMedia
 Product Name: WINCheckIt; Chec-It Set Up Advisor; Landmark WINProbe;
               Landmark DataSafe; First Aid, for Windows users
     Abstract: Introduces a buyer's guide to Windows utilities. Features
               reviews of six products including: WINCheckIt v2.0 ($79.95)
               and Chec-It Set Up Advisor v1.1 ($29.95) from TouchStone
               Software Corp. of Huntingdon Beach, CA (800, 714); Landmark
               WINProbe v3.0 ($99) and Landmark DataSafe ($99) from
               Landmark Research International Corp. of Clearwater, FL
               (800, 813); First Aid, for Windows Users v1.2 ($129.95) from
               CyberMedia Inc. of Los Angeles, CA (800, 310); and
               wInformant v2.0 ($49.95) from Neocom Microspecialists Inc.
               of Martinsville, VA (703). Includes six screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Window Software; Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Software
               Review
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: B B B B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI07-053
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: The perfect utilities toolkit -- The right tool for the job
               at hand often spells the difference between perfection and
               frustration. Do you have all the right...
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1994) v13 n13 p221-237
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: Presents a buyer's guide to purchasing the perfect utilities
               toolkit. Features a table comparing utilities bundled with
               three operating systems and two utility packages. Includes a
               diagram explaining how memory managers work, a diagram
               showing what optimization does for a hard drive, and a
               two-page sidebar by John Moore describing graphics
               utilities. Describes a variety of commercial utilities,
               including prices and vendor information. Includes two screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Operating Systems; Vendor Guide; Bundled
               Software; Memory; Hard Disk Drive; Optimization
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI07-037
       Author: Hicks, Adam A
        Title: Close-Up 6.0 steps up Windows remote-control speeds
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1994) v13 n13 p69
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Norton-Lambert
 Product Name: Close-Up
     Abstract: Announces the release of Close-UP v6.0 ($199), a
               remote-control software package from Norton-Lambert Corp. of
               Santa Barbara, CA (805). Reveals that this new upgrade
               offers better Windows performance and added features,
               drawing on artificial intelligence technology to improve the
               speed of screen redraws within Windows. Says the package
               offers remote printing support, keeps a log of host
               transactions, checks for viruses, and support for sharing
               modems.
Descriptor(s): Remote Computing; Window Software; Upgrade; Utility Program
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI07-033
       Author: Hicks, Adam A
        Title: Solid Oak tags hard disk waste
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1994) v13 n13 p66
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Solid Oak Software
 Product Name: Disk Historian Network Edition; Disk Historian
     Abstract: Announces the release of Disk Historian Network Edition
               ($795) and Disk Historian v2.1 ($79.95), a utility for
               tracking file activity from Solid Oak Software Inc. of Santa
               Barbara, CA (800, 805). Says that both the network edition
               and upgraded v2.1 are excellent utilities for identifying
               unnecessary files for network administrators to purge. Notes
               that both have a file viewer and a control box for
               deactivating the program from within Windows. Includes one
               screen display.
Descriptor(s): Network Management; Utility Program; Disk Files; Local Area
               Networks; Document Viewer; Window Software
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI08-073
       Author: Stevenson, Ted
        Title: Remote-control software: how to be in 2 places at once --
               Today's remote-control packages break the tyranny of the
               workplace: Now you can do it here even if you keep it
               somewhere else.
       Source: PC Magazine (August 1, 1994) v13 n14 p275-313
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Symantec
 Product Name: pcAnywhere; pcAnywhere for Windows
     Abstract: Presents reviews of 11 remote-control software packages
               which run under Windows, DOS, and OS/2. Formerly, such
               packages were difficult to set up, slow performers, limited
               in ability to handle graphics, and weak in security.
               Recently released products, such as those reviewed, address
               these issues so that remote-control software is much more
               appealing. Packages are rated on ease of setup and
               configuration, remote control (running host programs),
               remote access (accessing host files), and security. Includes
               a benchmark test and a buyer's guide comparing features of
               programs reviewed. A sidebar by Kathleen Caster examines
               programs offering only remote access. A sidebar by Amarendra
               Singh and Ted Stevenson discusses remote control on a LAN. A
               sidebar by John Clyman describes WinView for Networks from
               Citrix Systems. Norton pcAnywhere for DOS and Windows ($179
               each) from Symantec Corp. are "Editors' Choice." Includ! es
               one illustration, three graphs, 12 screen displays, four
               tables.
Descriptor(s): Remote Computing; Window Software; Software Review;
               Benchmark Testing; Vendor Guide; Utility Program; Local Area
               Networks
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI05-293
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: Switch Windows setups with Switcher
       Source: PC Magazine (May 31, 1994) v13 n10 p311-316
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Company Name: Douglas Boling
 Product Name: Switcher
     Abstract: UTILITIES column describes the Switcher utility program,
               which saves up to 16 different Windows 3.1 configurations.
               Notes that after saving the configuration, it can be
               returned by a mouse click. Explains how to set up the
               Switcher button and other configuration information; how
               Switcher works; how to delete a button; and how to changes
               the settings of a particular button. Describes the system
               calls that this program uses, and details the use of the
               Microsoft Windows API function called SystemParametersInfo()
               for querying and setting many of the parameters that
               Switcher saves. Includes a listing of the 35 items that can
               be set and queried by this program. Also considers the
               Switcher window, noting that the window width may not be
               narrower than necessary to display the menu text on one
               line. This program and its C source code is available either
               online from PC MagNet, or by mail. Includes two program
               listings and two tables.!
Descriptor(s): Window Software; Utility Program; Tutorial; Multitasking
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 94PI06-091
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Save paper: Print with WINPRIN
       Source: PC Magazine (June 14, 1994) v13 n11 p345-352
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: Presents a description of the Windows text-printing utility
               WINPRIN, written by the author. Says that the utility prints
               text files in 1-, 2- and 4-page-per sheet per format, making
               it easier to put more text on a single page of printer
               paper. Examines how to use WINPRIN, how it works, and looks
               at its source code. Goes over possible error messages and
               how to correct them, and takes a close look at the process
               of Windows printing. Provides ways to enhance the utility,
               such as initializing printer settings or adjusting paper
               sizes. Gives all necessary information to obtain WINPRIN,
               through the Ziff-Net online services. Includes two screen
               displays and a utility.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Printer Controller
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 9312PI-331
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: Taking command away from COMMAND.COM
       Source: PC Magazine (December 21, 1993) v12 n22 p323-334
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: The UTILITIES column discusses the use of the QPATH (quick
               path) utility, which permits the user to direct DOS to
               search for a program in a specific directory, rather than in
               the current directory. Says QPATH is a Terminate and Stay
               Resident (TSR) utility which also stops DOS from executing
               specified commands and describes how it can be installed.
               Features program listings for the Findinstalled and FindProg
               routines and discloses that the QPATH utility can be
               downloaded from PC MagNet. Includes a table.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; DOS; Directories
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI12-238
       Author: Grimes, Brad
        Title: Software utility keeps track of what you do in Windows
       Source: PC Magazine (December 21, 1993) v12 n22 p69
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Basic Systems
 Product Name: Win, What, Where
     Abstract: Announces the release of Win, What, Where ($37), a utility
               program from Basic Software of Kennewick, WA (800, 509).
               Says it monitors tasks being performed in Windows and
               provides various information on those tasks such as what
               time it began, how long it lasted, files used, etc. Comments
               that it is useful for tracking work time for billing and tax
               purposes, it has an automatic delete feature, and it
               provides summaries of the information. Includes a screen
               display.
Descriptor(s): Time and Billing Software; Window Software; Utility Program;
               Monitor
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI12-232
       Author: Grimes, Brad
        Title: Sonera brings DisplayMate video utilities to Windows
       Source: PC Magazine (December 21, 1993) v12 n22 p63
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Sonera Technology
 Product Name: DisplayMate for Windows
     Abstract: Announces the release of DisplayMate for Windows ($129), a
               display utility from Sonera Technologies of Rumson, NJ
               (908). Says it helps enhance the sharpness and contrast of a
               monitor display, shrink geometric distortion, reduce Moire
               patterns, and improve color and gray-scale accuracy. Adds
               that it also supports color modes from monochrome to 24-bit
               color. Includes a screen display.
Descriptor(s): Color Display; Utility Program; Monitor; Window Software
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 93PL12-015
       Author: DeMaio, Michelle
        Title: Laptop office -- The freedom portable computers offer has
               created a new breed of highly mobile professionals. Laptop
               Office looks at the latest...
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (December 1, 1993) v5 n12
               p82-83
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: BookMaker; Golden Technologies; Microfield Graphics; ORA
               Electronics; Cellabs
 Product Name: ClickBook; Sliders & Dials; SoftBoard; IDEA; MiniDial
     Abstract: LAPTOP OFFICE column presents a buyer's guide to five
               products from five companies for laptop computers. Includes
               product features, pricing and vendor information. Includes
               one color drawing and three color photos.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Software; Data Transmission; Vendor Guide;
               Consumer Information; Lap-sized Microcomputer
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 93PL12-010
       Author: Rohan, Rebecca
        Title: Useful utilities
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (December 1, 1993) v5 n12
               p52-55
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
  Standard No: 1043-1314
     Abstract: Presents a buyer's guide to software utilities for laptop
               computers. Features the benefits, components, hardware and
               operating system requirements, price and vendor information,
               and capsule evaluations of eight products from eight
               companies. Includes "Battery Boost Notebook Utility
               Pack"(p53) side-bar. Includes one cartoon and five photos.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Consumer Information;
               Lap-sized Microcomputer
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI09-110
       Author: Derubrouck, John
        Title: Launch your applications the easy way with BTNGO
       Source: PC Magazine (September 14, 1993) v12 n15 p347-354
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: John Deurbrouck
 Product Name: BTNGO
     Abstract: UTILITIES column provides an overview of a free utility for
               Windows' Program Manager called BTNGO (for ButtonGo). Says
               it lets you set up a button bar for displaying only the
               icons of the programs you run most frequently. Explains that
               it can be used with both Windows 3.0 and 3.1, and in 3.1 it
               can float over other Windows applications so you don't have
               to return to the Program Manager to use it. Describes how to
               install and use BTNGO. Notes that BTNGO along with its C++
               source files can be downloaded from PC MagNet's
               Utilities/Tips Forum. Includes one screen display, two code
               listings, and a sidebar on PC MagNet's programs.
Descriptor(s): User Interface; Utility Program; C Programming Language;
               Window Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI09-108
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Using the DOS 6.0 antivirus tools
       Source: PC Magazine (September 14, 1993) v12 n15 p331-333
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: Microsoft
 Product Name: MS-DOS
     Abstract: TUTOR column presents a tutorial on the antivirus tools in
               DOS 6.0: MSAV providing passive protection against viruses;
               and VSAFE providing active protection against viruses and
               Trojan Horses. Says that MSAV can be added to your
               AUTOEXEC.BAT file so that it runs automatically and it can
               be used to check specific files. VSAFE reveals infections
               already present and includes eight customizable options.
               Concludes that these two utilities can drastically reduce
               the danger of viruses in your PC. Includes two screen
               displays and one table.
Descriptor(s): Virus; Utility Program; Troubleshooting; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI09-285
       Author: Knoblaugh, Rick
        Title: Locate available IRQs with FINDIRQ
       Source: PC Magazine (September 28, 1993) v12 n16 p330-337
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Company Name: Rick Knoblaugh
 Product Name: get_stacks_seg; find_drivers
     Abstract: UTILITIES column focuses on a PC Magazine utility called
               FINDIRQ that tells which devices in your system are using
               which IRQs and which IRQs are unassigned. Explains how to
               use FINDIRQ and its syntax options. Briefly reviews the
               subject of interrupt processing. Details how FINDIRQ works,
               including its checking the system model ID byte, reading the
               PIC mask registers, and displaying the device description
               for an IRQ which is enabled and has a standard system
               assignment. Also covers how to find a device driver or TSR
               program by looking at the interrupt vector corresponding to
               the IRQ and how to find the name of the device. Presents two
               assembly language programs for IBM PC compatibles: 1)
               get_stacks_seg, for determining the segment where the
               DOS_STACKS code resides and finding the original IRQs, and
               2) find_drivers, for checking for a description for devices
               with active IRQs. FINDIRQ is available from PCMagNet.
               Includes one d! iagram, one screen display, and a quick
               reference guide for FINDIRQ.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Board; Hardware Evaluation; Peripherals;
               Programming Instruction; Memory
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI09-283
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Writing DOS utilities with DEBUG, part 1
       Source: PC Magazine (September 28, 1993) v12 n16 p317-320
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: TUTOR column describes how to use DOS DEBUG to build a small
               program called GETKEY, which reads a character from the
               keyboard and returns an exit code identifying the key that
               was pressed. Defines the registers, segment registers, index
               registers, pointer registers, instruction pointer, and
               interrupts. Also discusses two methods of reading a
               character from the keyboard: by calling DOS function 08h,
               Character Input Without Echo, and calling interrupt 16h,
               function 00h, a programming function in the PC ROM BIOS that
               returns an ASCII key code in register AL. Explains the use
               of the assembly MOV command to place function numbers in the
               AH register, and describes how to execute an INT command.
               Also covers terminating the program, entering the
               instructions with debug, and storing them to disk as a .COM
               program. Provides information on ROM BIOS Interrupt 16h
               keyboard functions. Includes two tables and one program
               listing.
Descriptor(s): Keyboard; Utility Program; Program Listing; DOS; Programming
               Instruction
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI09-230
        Title: Back up your data without hindering system performance
       Source: PC Magazine (September 28, 1993) v12 n16 p59
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: CCT
 Product Name: Back In A Flash!
     Abstract: Announces the release of Back In A Flash! ($49), an OS/2 2.1
               archive and backup utility from CCT Inc. of Minneapolis, MN
               (612). Runs on IBM PC compatibles. Notes that Back In A
               Flash! uses OS/2's preemptive multitasking and
               multithreading capabilities to perform backups while you
               work, with practically no loss in system performance. In
               addition, says this true 32-bit application features file
               compression and support for hidden and system files, and it
               can back up to magneto-optical disks, hard disks, and
               network drives.
Descriptor(s): Backup; OS/2; Multitasking; Compression; Utility Program;
               Networks
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; OS/2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI09-228
        Title: Calera takes OCR to the next level in WordScan Plus 2.0
       Source: PC Magazine (September 28, 1993) v12 n16 p59
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Calera Recognition Systems
 Product Name: WordScan; WordScan Plus
     Abstract: Reports on the release of WordScan v2.0 ($295) and WordScan
               Plus v2.0 ($695), optical character recognition (OCR)
               programs from Calera Recognition Systems Inc. of Sunnyvale,
               CA (800, 408). They run on IBM PC compatibles. Claims that
               Calera's new 32-bit Adaptive Recognition Technology applies
               contextual information during the recognition process to
               identify characters based on whole words or pages, rather
               than on a character-by-character basis, making for greater
               accuracy. Also notes that both programs support OLE 2.0, and
               WordScan Plus can be accessed from within a Windows
               application. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Optical Character Recognition; Window Software; Utility
               Program; Software Review
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: B B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI09-043
       Author: Ayre, Rick Barr, Christopher Mendelson, Edward Singh,
               Amarendra
        Title: What's the price of a free lunch? DOS 6 utilities vs. the
               competition -- You get a host of utilities for free when you
               upgrade to MS-DOS 6.0. But can they hold their own with the
               established
       Source: PC Magazine (September 14, 1993) v12 n15 p108-158
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Stac Electronics; Helix Software; Symantec
 Product Name: Stacker for Windows & DOS; NetRoom; Norton Utilities, The
     Abstract: Introduces a buyers' guide to 20 utility programs and
               compares them to the utilities in MS-DOS 6.0 for
               performance, safety, reliability, and ease of use. Presents
               reviews of five data compression, four memory management,
               seven backup and restore, and four data recovery programs.
               Includes product summaries for each category, two graphs and
               nine tables of benchmark test results, and four screen
               displays. Editor's Choice Awards: Data Compression - Stacker
               v3.1 for Windows & DOS ($149) from Stac Electronics (800);
               Memory Management - NetRoom v3.0 ($99, one user; $179, four
               users) from Helix Software (800); Backup and Restore - no
               Editor's Choice; and Data Recovery - The Norton Utilities
               v7.0 ($179) from Symantec (800).
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Compression; Memory; Management; Backup;
               Software Review; Vendor Guide
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows; DOS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI11-050
       Author: Knoblaugh, Rick
        Title: Load device drivers from the DOS prompt with DRVLOAD
       Source: PC Magazine (November 9, 1993) v12 n19 p351-366
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents DRVLOAD, a utility for loading
               device drivers from the DOS prompt. With this utility,
               device drivers for infrequently used peripherals can be
               loaded without the necessity of editing CONFIG.SYS and
               rebooting. The program works with DOS 3.0 or later.
               Describes how the program works and provides suggestions for
               using it, as well as some troubleshooting information in the
               event that using it causes error messages. Includes complete
               listings of a routine used to issue the initialization
               command to a device driver and a program to alter system
               areas to add block devices. A sidebar describes ow to obtain
               PC Magazine's utilities by modem or by mail. Includes five
               tables.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Input/Output; Tutorial; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 93PL09-012
       Author: Yacco, Wayne
        Title: Parallel Storage Solutions PSS-525
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (September 1, 1993) v5 n9
               p42-43
    Pub. Type: Hardware Review
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Parallel Storage Solutions
 Product Name: PSS-525
     Abstract: Presents a favorable review of the PSS-525 ($1,795), a tape
               drive backup system from Parallel Storage Solutions of
               Elmsford, NY (800). Reports that the PSS-525 is very fast,
               backing up 8,545K of data in one minute, 53 seconds without
               compression. Notes that this drive is capable of storing 1GB
               of data using compression with its proprietary DOS software,
               and it performs well. However, says that compression
               requires setting a switch during installation, and it failed
               to work with one out of the three machines tested. Includes
               one photo.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Tape Drive; Portable; Hardware Review; Compression;
               Utility Program
        Grade: B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 93PL09-011
       Author: Yacco, Wayne
        Title: Valitek PST-250
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (September 1, 1993) v5 n9
               p42-43
    Pub. Type: Hardware Review
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Valitek
 Product Name: Valitek PST-250
     Abstract: Presents a mixed capsule review of the Valitek PST-250
               ($1,795), a tape drive backup system from Valitek of
               Amherst, MA (413). Says this substantial, 14-inch by 6-inch
               by 3 3/8-inch unit, has a 250MB capacity and a handle. Its
               proprietary DOS software requires no installation and allows
               backup over either a parallel or, more slowly, over a serial
               line. Reports very fast backup speed, taking five minutes,
               four seconds with compression, and only two minutes, 30
               seconds without compression, to back up 8,669K of data.
               However, there is no pass-through parallel port, and the
               Valitek PST-250 only worked with one of three test
               computers. Includes one photo.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Tape Drive; Portable; Hardware Review; DOS;
               Compression; Utility Program
        Grade: C
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 93PL09-010
       Author: Yacco, Wayne
        Title: Jumbo Trakker
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (September 1, 1993) v5 n9
               p41-43
    Pub. Type: Hardware Review
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: California Memory Systems
 Product Name: Jumbo Trakker
     Abstract: Presents a favorable capsule review of the Jumbo Trakker
               ($548), a portable tape drive backup system from Colorado
               Memory Systems, Inc. of Loveland, CO (303). Features a
               QIC-80-format and 250MB capacity. Says it is very portable,
               and it has a simple backup program which has full
               functionality, including unattended operation. Notes that
               its compression utility allows for either maximum speed or
               maximum compression, the latter of which resulted in a 53%
               compression ratio, backing up 8MB of files in eight minutes,
               14 seconds. Includes one photo.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Tape Drive; Portable; Hardware Review; Compression;
               Utility Program
        Grade: B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 93PL09-009
       Author: Yacco, Wayne
        Title: Storage Devices 250P
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (September 1, 1993) v5 n9 p41,
               43
    Pub. Type: Hardware Review
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Storage Devices; Gazelle Systems
 Product Name: Storage Devices 250P; Back-It 4
     Abstract: Presents an unfavorable capsule review of the Storage
               Devices 250P ($539), a portable tape drive backup system
               from Storage Devices, Inc. of Buena Park, CA (714). The
               smallest of the units tested, the 250P uses an external
               power supply, and it bundles Gazelle Systems' Back-It 4
               software for DOS. Reports that this drive locked up when
               trying to back up data; it did not work at all with a Librex
               test machine, nor did it auto-sense foreign voltage; and it
               required more time to work with than any of the other
               systems tested.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Tape Drive; Portable; Hardware Review; Utility
               Program
        Grade: D
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 93PL09-008
       Author: Yacco, Wayne
        Title: Autobahn Tape 250
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (September 1, 1993) v5 n9 p41,
               43
    Pub. Type: Hardware Review
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Portable Solutions; Central Point
 Product Name: Autobahn Tape 250; Backup
     Abstract: Presents a favorable capsule review of the Autobahn Tape 250
               ($529), a portable tape backup system from Portable
               Solutions of Anaheim, CA (714). Calls this a lightweight,
               stylish, rugged drive which is functionally the same as the
               Iomega Tape 250, except it lacks an internal power supply
               and is unable to rest on its side for a smaller footprint.
               Backup of a little over 8MB took eight minutes, 25 seconds,
               and the included Central Point Backup software compressed
               files to a ratio of 44%. Includes one photo.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Tape Drive; Portable; Hardware Review; Compression;
               Utility Program
        Grade: B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              * Libraries that Own Item: 14
   Record No.: 93PL09-007
       Author: Yacco, Wayne
        Title: Iomega Tape 250
       Source: PC Laptop Computers Magazine (September 1, 1993) v5 n9 p40,
               43
    Pub. Type: Hardware Review
  Standard No: 1043-1314
 Company Name: Iomega; Central Point
 Product Name: Iomega Tape 250; Backup
     Abstract: Presents a favorable capsule review of the Iomega Tape 250
               ($548), a portable tape drive backup system from Iomega
               Corp. of Roy, UT (801). Calls this a rugged machine which is
               also lightweight. Says the Tape 250 worked flawlessly on all
               three machines tested for backup, being compatible with
               each. Backup of a little over 8MB took eight minutes, 28
               seconds, and the included Central Point Backup software
               resulted in a 45% compression ratio for the files. Also
               reports that the Tape 250 contains its own power supply.
               Includes two photos.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Tape Drive; Portable; Hardware Review; Compression;
               Utility Program
        Grade: B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI07-042
       Author: Simon, Barry
        Title: System reporting software: taming your IRQs -- Today's
               Perfect PC is packed with peripherals, each making demands.
               As mice and modems, CD-ROMs and scanner proliferate, so
               do...
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1993) v12 n13 p265-285
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: TouchStone Software; RenaSonce Group
 Product Name: CheckIt PRO:SysInfo; Skylight
     Abstract: Presents reviews of 10 system reporting software packages.
               These packages can aid the user in resolving control
               conflicts between peripherals. Each time an expansion board
               is added to the system it must be given an IRQ and/or a DMA
               channel and/or an I/O port. Programs reviewed were required
               to report on two of the three of these options. CheckIt PRO:
               SysInfo ($99.95) from TouchStone Software, Huntington Beach,
               CA (800, 714) and Skylight version 3.0 ($99.95) from
               RenaSonce Group Inc., San Diego, CA (619) were "Editors'
               Choice." A sidebar describes the system reporting modules of
               Norton Desktop for Windows, PCTools for Windows, NetRoom,
               QEMM, 386MAX, and Microsoft System Diagnostic. Includes one
               illustration, three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Software Review
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI04-028
       Author: Grunin, Lori
        Title: The image crusaders: 12 screen capture & conversion
               utilities -- If your application can't read your image
               files, try one of these 12 programs to create a perfect fit.
       Source: PC Magazine (April 13, 1993) v12 n7 p221-259
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: North Coast Software; Inset Systems
 Product Name: Conversion Artist; HiJaak for Windows
     Abstract: Presents reviews of 12 screen capture utilities and graphics
               conversion utilities. To qualify for inclusion in the
               reviews, programs had to support a minimum of .PCX and TIFF
               formats, as well as 15- and 24-bit color images and to
               support screen captures. Prices of the programs reviewed
               range from $49 to $249. Notes that under Windows or OS/2
               Presentation Manager screen capturing is not a problem, but
               under DOS it "can be a nightmare." DOS programs usually must
               be able to load into EMS or XMS memory, which accounts for
               the lack of options in the DOS capture and conversion
               market. A sidebar by Jeff Mace discusses troubleshooting
               conversion programs. Another sidebar discusses compression
               of graphics files. Includes a buyer's guide comparing
               features. Conversion Artist ($149.95) from North Coast
               Software Inc. and HiJaak for Windows ($249) from Inset
               Systems are "Editors' Choice." Includes eight illustrati!
               ons, 15 tables, 12 screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Video Display; Conversions; Utility Program; Software
               Review; Vendor Guide; Graphics
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI04-020
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: DOS 6: the ultimate software bundle? -- Disk compression,
               memory management, file backup, virus protection--DOS has
               evolved to handle today's toughest computing...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 13, 1993) v12 n7 p108-152
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: Microsoft
 Product Name: MS-DOS 6.0
     Abstract: Presents a discussion of DOS 6. The importance of this
               system is twofold--it answers customer complaints about the
               omissions and shortcomings of prior version, and it builds
               into the operating system many of the utilities on which
               many users depend. Includes a description of DoubleSpace,
               the data compression enhancement; MemMaker, the memory
               manager; new start-up options which can bypass CONFIG.SYS or
               AUTOEXEC.BAT or run CONFIG.SYS line by line; Microsoft
               Backup; Microsoft Anti-Virus; and Microsoft Undelete.
               Includes reviews of these enhancements, comparing them to
               the leading third-party products in each category. A sidebar
               presents twelve tips to getting the most out of DOS 6. A
               sidebar by Barry Simon presents a wish list for DOS 7.
               Includes an annotated listing of DOS 6 files alphabetized by
               extension. Sidebars describe Novell DOS, an update of DR
               DOS, and IBM DOS. Includes one photo, seven screen displays,
               nine table! s.
Descriptor(s): MS-DOS; Tutorial; Software Review; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI04-002
       Author: Levin, Carol Ulanoff, Lance
        Title: Utility vendors find big market in bettering DOS 6
       Source: PC Magazine (April 13, 1993) v12 n7 p37, 42
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: Describes efforts by utility publishers to provide add-on
               products for DOS 6. Stac Electronics and Vertisoft Systems
               are developing data-compression products which will work
               with DOS's DoubleSpace disk compressor. In light of a
               shortage of features in MemMaker, DOS's memory manager,
               Helix Software is developing a new version of NetRoom 3 and
               Qualitas is developing 386MAX Version 7.0. DOS 6's InterLink
               file transfer utility may be disappointing, so Traveling
               Software is releasing LapLink V which has an improved
               graphical look and feel and provides peer-to-peer file
               transfers over NetWare at speeds up to 8MB per minute.
               Because of limitation in Microsoft Backup Symantec is
               releasing new versions of The Norton Backup for both DOS and
               Windows. The new Norton AntiVirus 3.0 is faster, more
               customizable, and more network aware than DOS's virus
               prevention and Symantec and Central Point Software continue
               to publish libraries. Inc! ludes two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): MS-DOS; Product Announcement; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI04-284
       Author: Grimes, Brad
        Title: Animate your own desktop with DeltaPoint's newest utility
       Source: PC Magazine (April 27, 1993) v12 n8 p64
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: DeltaPoint
 Product Name: Animated Desktop for Windows
     Abstract: Announces Animated Desktop for Windows v1.0 ($59.95) an
               animation utility program from DeltaPoint Inc. of Monterey,
               CA (408). Comes with an icon and cursor editor that allows
               manipulation of the 50 cursors or 400 static icons included,
               or you can also create your own. Includes animator to make
               your custom icons move. Animated Desktop also has an
               application launcher for putting commonly used applications
               in a single pull-down menu.
Descriptor(s): Animation; Utility Program; Icon; Editor; Window Software
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible; Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI04-279
       Author: Grimes, Brad
        Title: Helix ships Netroom 3.0
       Source: PC Magazine (April 27, 1993) v12 n8 p59
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Helix Software
 Product Name: Netroom
     Abstract: Announces Netroom v3.0 ($99), memory management software
               from Helix Software Co. of Long Island City, NY (800, 718).
               Features "Cloaking," a new technology which moves BIOS,
               video BIOS, screen savers, disk caches, RAM disks and other
               utilities to extended memory. The Cloaking API lets
               developers produce 32-bit applications that use little
               conventional memory.
Descriptor(s): Memory; Management; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI04-268
       Author: Petzold, Charles
        Title: Experimenting with OS/2 Outline Fonts -- Outline fonts offer
               greater flexibility than their bitmapped cousins. Here are
               the basics for listing and manipulating outline...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 27, 1993) v12 n8 p313-324
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Company Name: Charles Petzold
 Product Name: OLFLIST; OLFSIZE; OLFSTR1; OLFSTR2; OLFROT
     Abstract: ENVIRONMENTS column presents C programming language listings
               for listing and manipulating outline fonts in OS/2. OLFDEMO
               is a shell module to handle the Presentation Manager
               overhead for font enumeration and selection. OLFLIST lists
               the outline fonts in the client window. OLFSIZE displays
               fonts in different sizes. OLFSTR1 displays a font scaled to
               the size of the client window. OLFSTR2 displays a font
               scaled to the size of a client window while keeping correct
               proportions. OLFROT uses GpiSetCharAngle to display rotated
               outline fonts. Includes four screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Typeface; OS/2; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI04-267
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: WINCMD: a windows command language -- WNDCMD.EXE, a Windows
               counterpart to DOS's batch language, lets you automate tasks
               in the environment and even goes beyond its ...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 27, 1993) v12 n8 p302-312
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Product Name: WINCMD
     Abstract: UTILITIES column describes WINCMD.EXE, a Windows-based
               command file interpreter for creating simple Windows
               programs that perform repetitive functions. Says these
               functions were once done using the DOS batch file language,
               and users who switched to Windows have no similar language.
               Includes a list of the WINCMD.EXE statements and functions;
               a list of values that can be passed to the MsgBox function
               and the meaning of the values returned; a list of WinCmd key
               aliases used by the SENDKEY() function; complete listings
               for a file search program and a program to copy a file onto
               the Windows Clipboard; a sidebar with updates to utilities
               previously presented; and a sidebar with information on
               obtaining this utility by modem.
Descriptor(s): Programming Language; Window Software; Utility Program;
               Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI04-228
       Author: Seymour, Jim
        Title: Better integration, richer OS -- Letting apps share
               resources may seem like building a house of cards. But they
               still should
       Source: PC Magazine (April 27, 1993) v12 n8 p99-100
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: JIM SEYMOUR column explains why programs should share
               resources. Uses the dictionary as an example. Users who
               customize a dictionary used for spell-checking in one
               program, should be able to use that dictionary in other
               programs. Duplicate resources also take up valuable space.
               Adding the resources to the operating system assures
               standardization. Suggests that resources such as a
               dictionary, thesaurus, e-mail, LapLink-style file-transfer
               functions, and good backup and restore routines belong in
               the operating system. Counters claims of software vendors
               who say it will destroy the market for some of their
               products. Users often purchase products that duplicate
               operating system functions. Says this level of integration
               will not happen soon, but "it's the right thing to do."
Descriptor(s): Software; Operating Systems; Optimization; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-221
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Upgrading your PATH: How to add or remove directories easily
               -- User-to-user
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p427, 430
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
     Abstract: Presents a batch file listing called PATHEDIT.BAT written in
               by PC Magazine reader Richard Davies of Aurora, CO which
               allows addition and removal of directories from PATH without
               retyping anything. Includes a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; DOS; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-219
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Patching DISKCOPY: The addition of an audible disk-swap
               prompt makes DISKCOPY even -- easier to use Tutor
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p423
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: Responds to a letter sent in by PC Magazine reader
               Christopher Stout of Wichita, KS inquiring of a way of
               patching in an audible sound when disks need to be replaced
               when using the DISKCOPY command. Discusses the use of the
               DEBUG command for altering the DISKCOPY file.
Descriptor(s): Programming Design; Utility Program; DOS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-218
       Author: Salemi, Joe
        Title: Tracking files: Are there files on your hard disk you never
               use? -- Advisor
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p419
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: PC Magazine; Solid Oak Software
 Product Name: RECORDER; PC-Sentry
     Abstract: Responds to a letter written in by PC Magazine reader Andre
               Boulanger of Quebec, Canada concerning the availability of a
               utility file for deleting files unused during the course of
               a year. Says PC Magazine has a utility available called
               RECORDER which creates a list of up to 200 files that have
               been opened for tracking files, while another program,
               PC-Sentry from Solid Oak Software of Santa Barbara, CA (800,
               805) supports tracking of different levels of file
               activities.
Descriptor(s): Data Base Management; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-217
       Author: Salemi, Joe
        Title: MultiBoot upgrade: Using PC Magazines's MultiBoot utility
               with DOS 5.0 -- Advisor
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p419
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: Responds to a letter written in by PC Magazine reader
               Richard Barrows of Elko, Nevada on the incompatibility of
               the MultiBoot program with DOS 5.0. Says MultiBoot has been
               upgraded to version 5.1 by its author Doug Boling to allow
               it to operate on DOS 5.0, and is available from PC Magazine
               of New York, NY.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Upgrade
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-216
       Author: Terdeman, Sharon
        Title: Improved string searching: Enhance string searching by
               adding a Soundex routine to -- your BASIC programs Languages
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p407-408
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
     Abstract: Presents a BASIC program for use with modern BASIC versions
               called SOUNDEX.BAS which returns a code corresponding to how
               a word sounds to make it possible to identify names that
               sound alike but are spelled in a different way. Explains how
               the program works. Includes a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Sound; Utility Program; Program Listing; Basic
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-184
       Author: Simone, Luisa Sosinsky, Barrie Grunin, Lori Ores, Pauline
        Title: Darkroom, R.I.P.? -- Editing images on PC is easier than
               ever. But you still need heavy duty hardware and a lot of
               patience
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p185-188+
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Aldus; Micrografx; ZSoft; Image-In
 Product Name: Aldus PhotoStyler; Picture Publisher; PhotoFinish;
               Image-In-Color; Image-In-Color Professional
     Abstract: Introduces a buyer's guide reviewing color image-editing
               software, amontg which are: Aldus PhotoStyler 1.1a ($795)
               from Aldus Corp. of Seattle, WA (206); PhotoFinish 1.01
               ($199) from ZSoft Corp. of Marietta, GA (404); Picture
               Publisher 3.1 ($495) from Micrografx Inc. of Richardson, TX
               (800, 214); and Image-In-Color 3.0 ($495) and Image-In-Color
               Professional ($795) from Image-In Inc. of Minneapolis, MN
               (800, 612). Features a table comparing 149 features of 8
               products from 6 companies. Also features individual reviews
               of the products. Includes the following sidebars:
               "Suitability to Task: Image-Editing Software" (p.186);
               "Editors' Choice" (p.187); "Separation Anxiety" (p.202-203)
               by Luisa Simone; and "Mac Hegemony" (p.207) by Pauline Ores.
               Mentions Aldus PhotoStyler, PhotoFinish and Picture
               Publisher as the Editors' Choice products. Includes 10
               digitized images, 8 score cards, 5 photos,! 12 screen
               displays, 5 product summaries, 3 sets of bar graphs, and a
               table.
Descriptor(s): Image Processing; Editor; Vendor Guide; Consumer
               Information; Window Software; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-147
        Title: Software that answers the question: What's my line? -- New
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p64, 66
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: KnowledgePoint
 Product Name: DescriptionsWrite Now!
     Abstract: Announces the release of DescriptionsWrite Now! ($149), a
               utility program from KnowledgePoint of Petaluma, CA (800,
               707). Says DescriptionsWrite Now! helps users make custom
               job descriptions through a question-and-answer process
               defining responsibilities, job requirements, qualifications,
               and work conditions. Also says the program features
               context-sensitive job description writing advice, and a
               2,400-term job-title library.
Descriptor(s): Writing; Utility Program; Product Announcement; Employment
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-146
        Title: (Intex Solutions) -- Briefs: Utilities and add-ins
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p64, 66
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Intex Solutions
 Product Name: Ready to Run Accounting; Spellin! for Release 3; UltraBar
               for Lotus 1-2-3
     Abstract: Announces the release of the following spreadsheet add-in
               products from Intex Solutions (617): Ready to Run Accounting
               2.12 ($199.95); Spellin! for Release 3 ($95); and UltraBar
               for Lotus 1-2-3 ($69.95). Says Ready to Run Accounting is a
               small-business accounting package; Spellin! for Release 3 is
               a spellchecker for Lotus 1-2-3 Release 3.1 and 3.1 Plus
               spreadsheets; and UltraBar for Lotus 1-2-3 gives users up to
               75 icons in palettes and allows users to create icons.
Descriptor(s): Spreadsheet; Add-on; Product Announcement; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-144
        Title: (Bullseye Systems) -- Briefs: Utilities and add-ins
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p64
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Bullseye Systems
 Product Name: File Linker
     Abstract: Announces the release of File Linker ($295), a conversion
               utility from Bullseye Systems (408). Says File Linker
               imports and exports files, records and fields to and from
               applications one at a time.
Descriptor(s): Conversions; Utility Program; Product Announcement
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-142
        Title: CAM unveils PARISS line of business management apps -- New
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p64
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Computer Aided Management
 Product Name: PARISS Enterprise
     Abstract: Announces the release of PARISS Enterprise 1.0 ($2795), a
               project management software from Computer Aided Management
               Inc. of Petaluma, CA (800, 707). Says PARISS Enterprise
               features automated structured planning, resource calendars,
               table editors, presentation graphics, management reports,
               resource leveling, constraining, balancing, and load
               tracing.
Descriptor(s): Project Management; Product Announcement; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-141
        Title: Wordlinx 1.0: OCR software with a low price tag -- New
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p64
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Ocron
 Product Name: Wordlinx
     Abstract: Announces the release of Wordlinx 1.0 ($145), an optical
               character recognition software from Ocron Inc. of Santa
               Clara, CA (800, 408). Says Wordlinx comes with a text
               verifier and omnifont capability, works as a menu item on
               Windows word processors, recognizes 11 European languages,
               is compatible with flatbed and handheld scanners, and
               recognizes and transfers several text attributes.
Descriptor(s): Optical Character Recognition; Utility Program; Product
               Announcement
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-138
        Title: (BC Enterprises Software) -- Briefs: Utilities and add-ins
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p60
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: BC Enterprises Software
 Product Name: DB-Dupe
     Abstract: Announces the release of DB-Dupe 1.1 ($89), a duplicate
               record deletion system for dBASE III and compatible
               databases from BC Enterprises Software (703). Says DB-Dupe
               comes with a feature called DB-Zip, which checks for
               mismatched city, state, and ZIP code combinations in mailing
               lists.
Descriptor(s): Database; Utility Program; Product Announcement
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-136
        Title: (Alpha Software) -- Briefs: Utilities and add-ins
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p60
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Alpha Software
 Product Name: db*Spell; db*Spell Programmer's Edition
     Abstract: Reports that Alpha Software (617) released db*Spell ($99), a
               DOS utility program for database and spreadsheet files. Says
               db*Spell features support for more than eight file formats,
               and is available in a Programmer's Edition ($149) for
               checking spelling errors in programs written in five
               languages.
Descriptor(s): Spelling Checker; Product Announcement; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-135
        Title: Abbot Systems -- Briefs: Utilities and add-ins
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p60
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Abbot Systems
 Product Name: Calc+; Powerstrip for Windows
     Abstract: Reports that Abbot Systems (800, 914) has come out with two
               products: Calc+ 1.0 ($79); and Powerstrip for Windows 3.1
               ($79). Says Calc+ is a printing calculator, while Powerstrip
               for Windows is a menu bar utility that offers a
               Macintosh-like menu bar to Windows users.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Product Announcement; Calculator; Window
               Software; User Interface
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-124
       Author: Miller, Rock
        Title: DeltaGraph and Stanford take on technical charting --
               Presentation graphics
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p56-57
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: DeltaPoint; 3-D Visions
 Product Name: DeltaGraph Professional for Windows; Stanford Graphics for
               Windows
     Abstract: Introduces a buyer's guide reviewing two presentation
               graphics software products: DeltaGraph Professional for
               Windows 2.0 ($495) from DeltaPoint Inc. of Monterey, CA
               (800, 310); and Stanford Graphics for Windows 2.0 ($495)
               from 3-D Visions of Torrance, CA (800, 310). Features
               individual reviews of the products. Also includes vendor
               addresses and telephone numbers. Includes two screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Presentation Graphics; Window Software; Consumer
               Information; Vendor Guide; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 93PI02-211
       Author: Flanders, Bob Holmes, Michael
        Title: Optimize your disk drive efficiency with DEFRAGR
       Source: PC Magazine (February 23, 1993) v12 n4 p335-341
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents DEFRAGR, a utility which can
               improve hard disk efficiency by eliminating file
               fragmentation. Readers can determine if this is a problem by
               running CHKFRAG, a utility previously presented in the
               column and currently available on PC MagNet. Describes the
               types of information provided on-screen when DEFRAGR is
               running and lists restrictions to use of the program.
               Includes a detailed description of how the program works. A
               sidebar provides instructions for downloading utilities from
               PC MagNet. Includes two screen displays, three
               illustrations.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Optimization; Hard Disk Drive; Tutorial;
               Disk Files
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-244
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Taking out the trash -- Using EMM386 with DOS 5.0: A tiny
               program demonstrates that EMM386.EXE makes DOS 5.0 run in
               Virtual 86 mode
       Source: PC Magazine (November 23, 1992) v11 n20 p506, 508
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: TRASHOUT.BAT
     Abstract: Presents a batch file called TRASHOUT.BAT, which deletes all
               files and directories written within the C:TRASHCAN
               directory, supplementing a letter written in by Vancouver,
               BC-based PC Magazine reader Alan Zisman concerning a use of
               the drag-and-drop feature of Windows 3.1. Includes a program
               listing.
Descriptor(s): Data Base Management; Program Listing; Utility Program;
               Programming Design
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-243
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Using EMM386 with DOS 5.0 -- Using EMM386 with DOS 5.0: A
               tiny program demonstrates that EMM386.EXE makes DOS 5.0 run
               in Virtual 86 mode
       Source: PC Magazine (November 23, 1992) v11 n20 p503, 506
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: VIRT8086.ASM
     Abstract: Presents an assembly language program called VIRT8086.ASM, a
               program running under DOS 5.0 to see if DOS 5 is running
               under protected mode; a script file VIRT8086.SCR is also
               included which creates a file identical to that assembled
               from VIRT8086.ASM. The programs supplement a discussion
               written in by PC Magazine reader Eric Webb of Research
               Triangle Park, NC on DOS 5.0's protected-mode overhead.
               Includes two program listings.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; Assembly Language;
               Programming Design
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-242
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Testing for DESQview and Windows -- Testing for DESQview and
               Windows: This routine detects the presence of Windows or
               DESQview and can pass that information to a batch...
       Source: PC Magazine (November 23, 1992) v11 n20 p492-493
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: WINCHECK.COM
     Abstract: Presents two programs written in response to a question by
               PC Magazine reader Bob White of New York, NY on determining
               whether Windows or DESQview was running. WINCHECK.COM is a
               utility that detects the presence of Windows or DESQview,
               and WINTEST.BAT illustrates the use of WINCHECK.COM in a
               batch file. Includes two program listings.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; Programming Design
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-241
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: SMARTDrive update -- Testing for DESQview and Windows: This
               routine detects the presence of Windows or DESQview and can
               pass that information to a batch...
       Source: PC Magazine (November 23, 1992) v11 n20 p491-492
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
     Abstract: Presents a batch file created in response to a problem
               written in by reader Roy Hanson of Sunriver, OR related to a
               BOOT.BAT batch file and REBOOT.COM utility operational error
               traced to SMARTDrive 4.0. Says the batch file flushes the
               write-behind buffers before rebooting a machine to ensure
               all data is written to disk. Includes a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-239
       Author: Shaw, Richard Hale
        Title: Controlling the floppy disk drive -- Extending heap space:
               The UMB_HEAP unit links as many as four chunks of upper
               memory into the available heap of any Turbo Pascal program
       Source: PC Magazine (November 23, 1992) v11 n20 p468-469
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: DISKETTE.C
     Abstract: Presents a C program called DISKETTE.C sent in by PC
               Magazine reader Ferdinand Purnomo of Jakarta, Indonesia,
               which prompts the user to remove the current disk or insert
               a new one. Says the program operates under the assumption
               that the floppy disk is formatted. Includes a program
               listing.
Descriptor(s): Disk Drive; Program Listing; Utility Program; C Programming
               Language; Programming Design
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-238
       Author: Webb, Brian
        Title: Extending heap space -- Extending Heap space: The UMB_HEAP
               unit links as many as four chunks of upper memory into the
               available heap list of any Turbo
       Source: PC Magazine (November 23, 1992) v11 n20 p467-468
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: UMB_HEAP; TEST_UMB.PAS
     Abstract: Presents a Turbo Pascal program called UMB_HEAP sent in by
               PC Magazine reader Brian D. Webb of Bayton, TX which allows
               Turbo Pascal 6.0 to extend heap space into upper memory
               blocks, resulting in up to 200KB more program memory.
               Includes a Pascal program called TESTUMB.PAS which tests the
               UMB_HEAP unit. Includes two program listings.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; Pascal
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-237
       Author: Ricciardi, Sal
        Title: Updating GET values -- This technique for updating on-screen
               GET values takes advantage of new features of the GET object
               class in Clipper 5.0
       Source: PC Magazine (November 23, 1992) v11 n20 p465-466
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
     Abstract: Presents a Clipper program written in by PC Magazine reader
               Joe Wirtley of Seven Mile, OH which updates the value on the
               screen displayed by the @...GET command, which can be used
               in the VALID clause to change values in related data entry
               fields. Includes a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-234
       Author: Thorpe, Danny Ritchey, Pat
        Title: Customizing Windows' common dialog boxes, part 2 -- By
               combining the customization and control techniques learned
               in Part 1, you can make an OWL object that produces a
               COMMDLG dialog...
       Source: PC Magazine (November 23, 1992) v11 n20 p445-452
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
     Abstract: The second of a series of articles presents several programs
               that supplement a discussion where customization and control
               techniques relative to the Windows 3.1 COMMDLG are combined
               to produce a COMMDLG dialog that looks and feels like the
               Borland Windows Custom Controls (BWCC): CUSTOM1.RC, in C++,
               defines a dialog template for an Open dialog; CUSTOM1.PAS,
               in Pascal, creates a descendant of an object created in the
               preceding article; TEST3.PAS, in Pascal, is a test platform;
               TEST3.RC, in C++, is a resource file for the test program,
               containing only a menu definition; CUSTOM1.PAS, in Pascal,
               is a revision of the CUSTOM1.PAS program; UTEST4.PAS, in
               Pascal, is a small Object Windows Library; and TEST4.RC, in
               C++, is the resource menu for the TEST4 program. Includes
               four screen displays and eight program listings.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; Pascal; C Programming
               Language
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-132
        Title: Conversion Artist gains add-on interface, imaging modules --
               Improved
       Source: PC Magazine (November 23, 1992) v11 n20 p63-64
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: North Coast Software
 Product Name: Conversion Artist
     Abstract: Announces the release of Conversion Artist 1.1 ($149.95), a
               Windows bitmap imaging package from North Coast Software
               Inc. of Barrington, NH (603). Says Conversion Artist 1.1
               offers support for 32 bitmap formats, image conversion,
               color reduction, screen capture capabilities, printing,
               seven new file formats, seven new dithering techniques,
               improved TrueColor image display in standard VGA, enhanced
               Windows metafile support, JPEG image compression, a Dycam
               camera interface module, a module for printing to a Kodak
               6600 thermal printer, and an image editing module.
Descriptor(s): Image Processing; Utility Program; Upgrade; Window Software
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-081
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Repeating commands revisited: Executing commands on a list
               of filenames. Making exceptions: A batch file that lets you
               exclude ... -- User to user
       Source: PC Magazine (November 10, 1992) v11 n19 p456, 460+
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: Presents a delayed response to an answer given to a question
               in the April 10, 1990 issue regarding repeating commands;
               illustrates how a list of batch files can be effectively
               used in conjunction with universal DOS commands. Discusses
               how users of the REPT.BAT batch file can take advantage of
               the new syntax of DOS 5.0's DIR command; includes a
               demonstration provided by the author which makes use of the
               DELBAK program. Presents also a batch-file proposal sent by
               a New Mexico reader for EXCEPT.BAT, which enables DOS users
               to designate certain files not to be processed by "hiding"
               them temporarily. Includes three program listings.
Descriptor(s): Disk Files; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-078
       Author: Terdeman, Sharon
        Title: Building up a PChar: The easily extensible TOString object
               is a "smart" PChar -- Languages
       Source: PC Magazine (November 10, 1992) v11 n19 p421-422
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: TOString
     Abstract: Presents a question submitted by a Berkshire, England reader
               regarding TOString, a string object which builds complicated
               strings from any number of parts. Examines the TEString
               object written by author Neil J. Rubenking in response to
               the solution and discusses how it adds to the capabilities
               of TOString. Includes listings of programs implementing
               these two objects as well as UString, which executes both of
               them. Includes three program listings.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Optimization; Object-oriented
               Languages; Program Listing; Pascal
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-077
       Author: Ricciardi, Sal
        Title: A black-box copy function; this Clipper 5.0 function copies
               records between differently structured databases --
               Databases
       Source: PC Magazine (November 10, 1992) v11 n19 p415-417
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: DupRec()
     Abstract: Presents an overview of DupRec(), a Clipper 5.01 function
               contributed by Ronald Hansen of Staten Island, NY that
               copies a record from one database to another regardless of
               the order of the fields. Provides a step-by-step examination
               of DupRec(), which can be downloaded through the PC MagNet
               online forum, as well as a sample program, TDUPR.PRG, which
               tests the capabilities of that function. Discusses the role
               of Clipper's AEVAL() function in the DupRec() utility.
               Includes three program listings.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Database; Data Transmission; Program
               Listing; Interface
Compatibility: Clipper
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-076
       Author: Duncan, Ray
        Title: Memory management and mapped files in Win32 -- Power
               programming
       Source: PC Magazine (November 10, 1992) v11 n19 p403-404+
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: HEXVIEW2.C
     Abstract: Presents an overview of the evolution of memory management
               in Windows; spotlights the new mapped-file functions
               designed for the 32-bit flat, paged memory model. Discusses
               why the designers of OS/2 2.0 and NT/Win32 have foregone the
               benefits of the segmented paged- memory model and decided to
               adopt the flat model despite its much smaller virtual
               address space. Examines the Win32 memory-management API and
               discusses the three new memory-management functions - memory
               allocation, heap management and mapped files - that it
               imparts aside from the usual Windows memory-management
               functions; spotlights on the benefits and use of mapped-file
               functions. Includes a program listing of HEXVIEW2.C, a
               C-language utility which illustrates the potential of
               mapped-file APIs. Provides further references and a contact
               address for inquiries. Includes three program listings and
               tables as well as two diagrams.
Descriptor(s): Memory; Management; Utility Program; Program Listing; Window
               Software; Case Study
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI11-073
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: TIME! A threefold digital timer for Windows -- Utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (November 10, 1992) v11 n19 p361-362+
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: TIME!
     Abstract: Presents an overview of TIME!, a digital timer utility which
               makes use of the Windows interface's custom controls for
               programmers. Requires Borland C++ 3.0 or Microsoft C 6.0 as
               well as the Windows 3.x Software Development Kit for
               compilation. Says that TIME! is composed of three
               independent timers, each of which can be set, started and
               stopped; users may choose between red-on-black LED or
               black-on-gray LCD displays. Discusses construction of the
               TIME! Windows application as well as the custom controls
               behind its operation; provides listings for the main window
               dialog box as well as the DIGIT.H and DIGIT.DEF files. One
               sidebar announces updates to featured PC Magazine utilities
               while another explains the use of the DigiClass control with
               the SSK; still another discusses how developers can download
               through their modems these utilities through ZiffNet's PC
               MagNet service over at CompuServe. Includes three program
               listings as ! well as a screen.
Descriptor(s): Clock; Utility Program; Program Listing
Compatibility: Microsoft C; Borland C++; Microsoft Windows SDK
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI09-103
       Author: Grimes, Brad
        Title: Managing calls -- Trends
       Source: PC Magazine (September 29, 1992) v11 n16 p29-30
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: AG Communications Systems; Rochelle Communications
 Product Name: WindowPhone; Caller ID+Plus
     Abstract: Announces the availability of two products which can be used
               with the Caller ID telephone service. Says WindowPhone
               ($295), is a caller-management software from AG
               Communications Systems Corp. (800) which gives users a
               screen listing the caller's name and telephone number, and
               logs unanswered calls even with the computer off. Also says
               Rochelle Communications (800) is offering Caller ID+Plus
               ($195), which adds a history of previous calls to caller
               profiles. Includes a screen display.
Descriptor(s): Telephone; Utility Program; Product Announcement
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI10-354
       Author: Duncan, Ray
        Title: Writing portable programs for Windows
       Source: PC Magazine (October 27, 1992) v11 n18 p391-400
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: HEXVIEW
     Abstract: Presents a program called HEXVIEW, a utility for viewing a
               file in hex and binary. Says that it demonstrates many of
               the aspects of a functional Windows application as well as
               the surprisingly easy portability between the 16- and 32-bit
               Windows environment. Notes that you can download it from PC
               MagNet, archived as HEXVIE.ZIP. Discusses infrastructure
               procedures, event-handling procedures, file manipulation
               procedures, helper routines, and portability considerations.
               Includes three tables and one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Hexadecimal; Programming Instruction;
               Binary
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI10-351
       Author: Deurbrouck, John
        Title: Keep your PC's clock right to the second with WTIME
       Source: PC Magazine (October 27, 1992) v11 n18 p361-366
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: WTIME
     Abstract: Presents a C program called WTIME, a utility that puts your
               computer's time clock on the correct time. Runs under
               Windows 3.x or under OS/2's Windows implementation. Says
               that it uses your modem to synchronize the clock in your PC
               with that of the Automatic Computer Time Service (ACTS)
               which is maintained by the National Institute of Standards
               and Technology. Adds that you can either call with one mouse
               click to check the time, or you can call automatically when
               you bring up Windows. Notes that the program is also
               available free from PC MagNet. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Clock; Standards; Utility Program; C Programming Language
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI10-325
       Author: Dvorak, John C
        Title: Inside track
       Source: PC Magazine (October 27, 1992) v11 n18 p95
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Company Name: Microsoft; Nintendo; Apple Computer
     Abstract: INSIDE TRACK column says that it is amusing that Microsoft
               plans to put Windows in ROM so that it can be run on a
               variety of home appliances. Announces that there are secret
               projects being planned by Nintendo and Microsoft which will
               supply applications for Nintendo's new keyboard option for
               the basic Nintendo game machine. Adds that Microsoft may
               produce a version of Flight Simulator for Nintendo.
               Recommends Personics' (508) Laptop UltraVision ($69.95)
               which makes the LCD displays of laptops fill up the whole
               screen; and "New Life for Old PCs" ($29.95 with disk) by
               Aldred E. Poor from Business One Irwin (708), a book to help
               upgrade older machines. Adds that people using the terms
               OODL (Object-oriented Dynamic Language from Apple), paradigm
               shift, client/server, scalable, and mission-critical
               probably don't know what they are talking about.
Descriptor(s): Strategy; Lap-sized Microcomputer; Utility Program; Upgrade;
               Hardware; Games
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI10-126
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: The bugs you'll want to keep in your Windows 3.1 setup
       Source: PC Magazine (October 13, 1992) v11 n17 p371-379
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: BUGS
     Abstract: Presents a C program listing called BUGS, a screen saver for
               Windows v. 3.1. Says that it creates voracious little "bugs"
               which gradually eat away the display on your screen when the
               monitor is idle for a few minutes; it allows you to
               instantly restore your normal display with any keystroke or
               mouse movement. Notes that it is available on PC MagNet or
               directly from PC Magazine. Includes one screen display and
               the sidebar "Utilities by Modem."
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Monitor; C Programming Language;
               Programming Instruction; Window Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI10-090
        Title: Essential tools: the best utilities -- Our editors list the
               utilities you want to have in your toolbox when you do some
               very serious computing.
       Source: PC Magazine (October 13, 1992) v11 n17 p291-331
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents a buyers' guide to primarily DOS utilities but
               includes some Windows utilities. Reviews 30 products from 26
               companies in the following categories: command line
               enhancers (3); file managers (11); compressors (3); memory
               managers (4); graphics programs (6); lifesavers (3).
               Includes 10 screen displays and the sidebar "Traveling
               Utilities."
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Disk Files; Management; Software Review;
               Vendor Guide; Graphics; Compression
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-208
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Managing a TPWIN dialog box -- Languages
       Source: PC Magazine (February 25, 1992) v11 n4 p393-394
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: DLGEXMPL.PAS; DLGEXMPL.RC
     Abstract: Presents two Pascal programs: DLGEXMPL.PAS, which
               demonstrates a problem with Turbo Pascal for Windows which
               has a main window made up of an initially visible dialog
               box; and DLGEXMPL.RC, which is the resource script. Both
               programs complement a discussion on the management of TPWin
               dialog boxes written in by PC Magazine reader Patrick
               Philippot of Draveil, France. Includes two program listings.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Software Tools; Program Listing; Pascal
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-207
       Author: Winer, Ethan
        Title: Changing a file's date and time -- Languages
       Source: PC Magazine (February 25, 1992) v11 n4 p393
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: UPDATE.BAS
     Abstract: Presents a BASIC program called UPDATE.BAS written in by PC
               Magazine reader Mike Zier of Smallwood, NY which updates the
               date and time stamp on a disk file. Includes a program
               listing.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; Basic
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-205
       Author: Duncan, Ray
        Title: Making an ordinary Windows application pen-aware -- Power
               programming
       Source: PC Magazine (February 25, 1992) v11 n4 p381-884+
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
     Abstract: Presents seven C programs: DEMO1.C is the listing for the
               DEMO program's pen-oblivious version; DEMO1.H is a
               C-language header file for the DEMO1.C listing; DEMO1.DEF is
               the module definition file; DEMO1.RC is the resource script
               for DEMO1.C; DEMO2.C is a listing fragment that shows parts
               of the program that differ from DEMO1.C; DOCOMMAND() ROUTINE
               shows a code fragment from DEMO3.C; and the last shows two
               dialog templates for DEMO3. The programs complement a
               discussion covering how to make a conventional Windows
               application "pen-aware." Includes seven program listings and
               a screen display.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; C Programming Language
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-204
       Author: Petzoid, Charles
        Title: Experimenting with additive synthesis in multimedia Windows
               -- Environments
       Source: PC Magazine (February 25, 1992) v11 n4 p373-374+
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
     Abstract: Presents six C language programs: ADDSYNTH.MSC, a make file
               for Microsoft C 6.0; ADDSYNTH.BCP, a make file for Borland
               C++ 2.0; ADDSYNTH.C, an additive synthesis sound generation
               program; ADDSYNTH.RC, a resource script; ADDSYNTH.DEF, a
               module definition file; and ADDSYNTH.H, a header file. The
               programs supplement a discussion of the principle of
               additive synthesis, which breaks down, analyzes, and
               digitally regenerates musical tones to give sounds a
               richness not attainable using analog methods. Includes six
               program listings.
Descriptor(s): Sound; Program Listing; C Programming Language; Utility
               Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-202
       Author: Shaw, Richard Hale
        Title: Rid your disk of duplicate files with SHOWDUPE.EXE --
               Utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (February 25, 1992) v11 n4 p355-358
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: SHOWDUPE.INI
     Abstract: UTILITIES section presents a program called SHOWDUPE.INI,
               which allows customization of settings for the SHOWDUPE
               utility. Complements an article that describes a utility
               program available from PC MagNet or from PC Magazine called
               SHOWDUPE, which finds duplicate files in one or several hard
               drives, organizes them, and allows their deletion. Includes
               a program listing and a screen display.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-195
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: User-to user -- The ultimate iterating batch file
       Source: PC Magazine (February 25, 1992) v11 n4 p337-338
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: ITER.BAT
     Abstract: USER-TO-USER column presents a DOS batch file called
               ITER.BAT written in by PC Magazine reader Allen P. Krygeris
               of Seattle, WA which can execute a command of the user's
               choice up to 99,999,999 times. Includes a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; DOS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-193
       Author: Salemi, Joe
        Title: Advisor
       Source: PC Magazine (February 25, 1992) v11 n4 p331-332
    Pub. Type: Column
 Company Name: DacEasy
     Abstract: ADVISOR column presents answers to questions written in by
               PC Magazine readers on subjects that include: contacting the
               new owners of SmartKey; mouse driver incompatibilities;
               getting in touch with DacEasy; and obtaining PC Magazine
               utilities through the mail. Also lists and describes six
               programs that keep track of baseball statistics. Includes a
               screen display.
Descriptor(s): Consumer Information; Athletics; Mouse; Utility Program;
               Information
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-132
       Author: Torgan, Emerson Andrew
        Title: Pizazz Plus adds file compression, screen capture -- New &
               improved
       Source: PC Magazine (February 25, 1992) v11 n4 p64
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Application Techniques
 Product Name: Pizazz Plus
     Abstract: Announces the release of Pizazz Plus Version 3.0 ($149), a
               screen print and capture program from Application Techniques
               Inc. of Pepperell, MA (800). Says Pizazz Plus features a new
               bit-image file format converter, support for the HP DeskJet
               500C color printer, and screen capture functionality for
               both DOS and Windows environments.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Video Display; Product Announcement
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-420
       Author: Winer, Ethan
        Title: Hotkey menus in QuickBasic -- Languages
       Source: PC Magazine (February 11, 1992) v11 n3 p380
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: MENU.BAS
     Abstract: The second part of LANGUAGES column features a QuickBASIC
               program called MENU.BAS sent in by PC Magazine reader
               Eduardo Ballesteros of Guadalajara, Mexico, which shows a
               way to add a highlight bar menu to BASIC programs. Includes
               a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; Basic
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-415
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: Sum the numbers on your screen with ADDIT.COM -- Utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (February 11, 1992) v11 n3 p347-351, 354
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Product Name: ADDIT.COM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column describes a terminate and stay resident
               (TSR) program called ADDIT.COM which can calculate numbers
               blocked within a document. Says the TSR can include the
               negative sign, and allows pasting a display into the same or
               another document, but comes up only in character mode.
               Includes the following sidebars: "Downloading Utilities"
               (p348) gives instructions on downloading utilities from the
               PC MagNet online service; "Teaching ADDIT to Read" (p349) by
               Douglas Boling describes how the program finds and
               interprets numbers onscreen; and "Saving Memory Using RLE"
               (p351) by Douglas Boling discusses the use of run-length
               encoding with ADDIT. Includes two code fragments and a
               screen display.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Calculator
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-413
       Author: Derfler, Frank J
        Title: Connectivity
       Source: PC Magazine (February 11, 1992) v11 n3 p339
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: CONNECTIVITY column describes enhanced parallel ports (EPP)
               as a technology that offers faster throughput. Also
               describes a C program written in by Ricardo Machado and
               Marcelo Albuquerque of Rio De Janeiro in Brazil that allows
               changing of the address of LPTx in the BIOS data area.
               Includes a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Parallel Input/Output; Program Listing; C Programming
               Language; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-410
       Author: Finnegan, Fran
        Title: Managing .ZIP files -- Windows
       Source: PC Magazine (February 11, 1992) v11 n3 p333
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Product Name: PKUNZIP.EXE
     Abstract: WINDOWS column features a tip written in by PC Magazine
               reader Steve Konings of Milwaukee, WI on .ZIP file
               management. Suggests that PKUNZIP.EXE be placed within the
               same directory as the downloaded .ZIP file, clicking the
               zipped file and dragging it to PKUNZIP, then releasing it.
               Includes an explanation on why the method works.
Descriptor(s): Compression; Utility Program; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-409
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Pausing a batch file -- User-to-user
       Source: PC Magazine (February 11, 1992) v11 n3 p329
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: ALTPAUSE
     Abstract: USER-TO-USER column features two script programs that insert
               an optional pause in batch files: ALTPAUSE.SCR produces the
               ALTPAUSE.COM that pauses batch files in the shift key is
               held down, and was written in by reader Tom R. Donnelly of
               San Dimas, CA; and ALTPAUS2.SCR sets the ERRORLEVEL to 1 if
               used to pause a batch file. Includes two program listings.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-408
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Detecting step levels -- Tutor
       Source: PC Magazine (February 11, 1992) v11 n3 p317-318, 328
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: 386STEP.ASM
     Abstract: TUTOR column presents an assembly language program called
               386STEP.ASM, which detects the stepping level of an 80386
               chip by executing an XBTS instruction and testing for an
               invalid opcode exception. 386STEP.SCR is a script code that
               produces the 386STEP.COM utility that functions similar to
               the 386STEP.ASM program. Includes two program listings.
Descriptor(s): 80386; Program Listing; Utility Program; Assembly Language
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-407
       Author: Salemi, Joe
        Title: Advisor -- Solutions
       Source: PC Magazine (February 11, 1992) v11 n3 p315
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: ADVISOR column presents answers to questions written in by
               PC Magazine readers covering the subjects of telephone
               access for hearing-impaired PC users and utilities that
               allow turning batch files into executable programs.
Descriptor(s): Handicapped; Telecommunications; Computers and Society;
               Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-084
       Author: Cohn, David
        Title: 19 programs that build on AutoCAD -- AutoCAD is the dominant
               CAD program in the world today, but hundreds of add-on
               programs from independent developers helped it get there
       Source: PC Magazine (February 11, 1992) v11 n3 p259-289
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyer's guide reviewing AutoCAD utility
               programs, among which are: AutoManager Professional 4.22
               ($495) from Cyco International of Atlanta, GA (404);
               AutoSight Access 3.0 ($299) from AutoSight Inc. of
               Melbourne, FL (407); AutoView Plus 3.75 ($195) from MarComp
               of Parkton, MD (301); AutoVue 11.2 ($250) from Cimmetry
               Systems Inc. of Cambridge, MA (800, 514); Drawing Librarian
               Professional 1991.7 ($500) from SoftSource Inc. of
               Bellingham, WA (800, 206); FastLook Plus 5.0 ($295) from
               Kamel Software Inc. of Chuluota, FL (407); SirlinView Plus
               1.2 ($495) from Sirlin Computer Corp. of Londonderry, NH
               (603). Features a table comparing 53 features of 10 drawing
               viewer software utilities from 10 companies and another
               table comparing 19 features of 9 text editor utilities from
               9 companies. Also features individual reviews of the
               products. Includes 23 screen displays, 19 product summaries,
               and two tables.
Descriptor(s): Computer Aided Design; Utility Program; Consumer
               Information; Vendor Guide; Drafting; Software Review
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-074
       Author: Simon, Barry Pastrick, Greg
        Title: Nine memory managers open up new frontiers -- Software
       Source: PC Magazine (February 11, 1992) v11 n3 p207-10, 212+
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Introduces a buyer's guide reviewing memory management
               software products: QEMM-386 6.0 ($99.95) from Quarterdeck
               Office Systems Inc. of Santa Monica, CA (213); 386MAX 6.0
               ($99.95) from Qualitas Inc. of Bethesda, MD (800, 301);
               ATLast! 5.0 ($59.95) from RYBS Electronics Inc. of Boulder,
               CO (303); DOS 5 Memory Management Kit ($79) from Biologic of
               Manassas, VA (703); DR DOS 6.0 ($99) from Digital Research
               Inc. of Monterey, CA (800, 408); Memory Commander 2.1
               ($99.95) from V Communications Inc. of San Jose, CA (408);
               MS-DOS 5.0 Upgrade Kit ($99.95) from Microsoft Corp. of
               Redmond, WA (206); and Netroom 2.13 ($99) from Helix
               Software of Long Island City, NY (800, 718). Features a
               table comparing 46 features of products from nine companies.
               Mentions QEMM-386 and 386MAX as the Editor's Choice
               products. Includes two diagrams, six screen displays, 9
               photos, nine product summaries, nine score cards, a table,
               and four sets of bar gra! phs.
Descriptor(s): Memory; Management; Consumer Information; Vendor Guide;
               Utility Program; Benchmark Testing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI02-035
       Author: Torgan, Emerson Andrew
        Title: The Writer's Toolkit comes to Windows -- New & improved
       Source: PC Magazine (February 11, 1992) v11 n3 p64
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Systems Compatibility
 Product Name: Writer's Toolkit for Windows, The
     Abstract: Announces the release of The Writer's Toolkit for Windows
               2.0 ($129), a writing utility program from Systems
               Compatibility Corp. of Chicago, IL (800, 312). Says The
               Writer's Toolkit features the Dictionary of Common
               Knowledge, drag-and-drop menus, a thesaurus, a book of
               quotations, a grammar checker, an abbreviation book, and a
               style guide. Also says the software allows simultaneous data
               retrieval from open tools while entering the desired term
               only once. Includes a screen display.
Descriptor(s): Writing; Utility Program; Product Announcement
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI05-292
       Author: Duncan, Ray
        Title: The Windows file-oriented common dialog functions -- Power
               programming
       Source: PC Magazine (May 26, 1992) v11 n10 p379-384+
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: DLGDEMO.C
     Abstract: POWER PROGRAMMING column features a C program called
               DLGDEMO.C which demonstrates the use of Windows 3.1
               file-oriented common dialog functions. Describes the
               COMMDLG.DLL, COMMDLG.H, and COMMDLG.LIB components of common
               dialogs. Includes three tables, a program listing, and two
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; C Programming Language;
               Window Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI05-289
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: SPRINTER adds a flexible cursor speedup to your PC --
               Utilities
       Source: PC Magazine (May 26, 1992) v11 n10 p357-360
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
 Product Name: SPRINTER.COM
     Abstract: Describes SPRINTER.COM, a terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR)
               program that adds a cursor-accelerator feature similar to
               that of an IBM 3778 mainframe. Says SPRINTER will not work
               with applications that take over the keyboard interrupt,
               such as Windows. Elaborates on the six optional command line
               parameters of SPRINTER.COM. Discusses how SPRINTER operates.
               Features two sidebars: "Downloading Utilities" (p358) which
               presents an overview of the PC MagNet online system that
               makes available PC Magazine utilities; and "PC Magazine
               Utilities Updates" (p359), which shows the latest versions
               of utilities on PC MagNet.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Desktop Software; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI05-284
       Author: Finnegan, Fran
        Title: Is Windows running? -- Windows
       Source: PC Magazine (May 26, 1992) v11 n10 p345-346
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: WINMODE.C
     Abstract: WINDOWS column presents a C program called WINMODE.C for
               DOS-based machines which informs a user if Windows or the
               DOS 5.0 Task Switcher is running from the DOS prompt.
               Includes a program listing and a source code.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Window Software; Program Listing; C
               Programming Language
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI05-283
       Author: Feldman, Bryan D
        Title: Shelling to DOS -- User-to-user
       Source: PC Magazine (May 26, 1992) v11 n10 p344
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: WIN.BAT
     Abstract: Presents a Basic program for DOS-based machines called
               WIN.BAT which helps avoid loading Windows atop a copy of
               Windows that is already running when using the DOS shell.
               Includes a screen display.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Window Software; Program Listing; Basic
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI05-282
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Saving DOSKEY macros -- User-to-user
       Source: PC Magazine (May 26, 1992) v11 n10 p343-344
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: SAVEMAC.BAS; LOADMAC.BAT
     Abstract: Presents two Basic programs for DOS-based machines:
               SAVEMAC.BAS saves DOSKEY macros by automatically inserting
               the DOSKEY command before every line in a batch file
               containing the macros; and LOADMAC.BAT is a batch file
               containing several DOSKEY macros. Includes two program
               listings.
Descriptor(s): Template; Program Listing; Utility Program; Basic
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI05-235
       Author: Torgan, Emerson Andrew
        Title: Swans! Mirrors! More fish! -- New & improved
       Source: PC Magazine (May 26, 1992) v11 n10 p64, 66
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Berkeley Systems
 Product Name: After Dark for Windows
     Abstract: Announces the release of After Dark for Windows Version 2.0
               ($49.95), a screen saver program from Berkeley Systems Inc.
               of Berkeley, CA (510). Says After Dark for Windows features
               digitized sound, True Color graphics, 40 displays, a
               MultiModule feature, a Sounder module, support for Sound
               Blaster cards and Multimedia sound, and two-level password
               protection. Also says the program can blank windows in the
               DOS environment in the latest version. Includes a photo.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Window Software; Product Announcement;
               Upgrade
Compatibility: Microsoft Windows
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI07-056
       Author: Stinson, Craig
        Title: Excel shortcut keys: perform common spreadsheet tasks
               quickly; Saving unnamed 1-2-3/W files: a macro that pops up
               Save As dialog when ...
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1992) v11 n13 p535-536
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: Presents a table of 20 Excel shortcut keys in the areas of
               data entry, editing, and files, some of which are
               undocumented. Also gives a small macro which automatically
               invokes the Save As command whenever a filename similar to
               FILE0000.WK3 is created for a new spreadsheet, so as to
               rename the file then and there. In addition, describes a way
               of making the field size of dates the same size in Quattro
               Pro as well as Lotus 1-2-3, instead of some being 2 digits
               and some 4 digits. Includes 1 table.
Descriptor(s): Spreadsheet; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI07-055
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: User-to-user expands!: Now we'll cover tips on DOS and
               Windows A FOR command quirk: How to split off the first
               character of any ...
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1992) v11 n13 p527-530
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: GETLNGTH.BAT; REVERSE.BAT; ADD.BAT
     Abstract: Presents three batch files for IBM PC compatibles.
               GETLNGTH.BAT calculates the length of any text string by
               using the FOR batch command and the slash (/) symbol.
               REVERSE.BAT is used to create an inverted copy of a given
               string by removing characters from the front of the string,
               one at a time. ADD.BAT adds or subtracts decimal numbers, by
               use of the STRINGS utility. These programs are available for
               downloading from PC MagNet. Includes 3 program listings.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; DOS
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI07-052
       Author: Terdeman, Sharon
        Title: Word wrapping in BASIC: how to display long strings more
               attractively; Checking serial numbers: getting and setting a
               disk's serial ...
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1992) v11 n13 p495-498
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: StringBreak; SERIAL.PAS
     Abstract: Presents a BASIC program function for IBM PC compatibles
               called StringBreak, which accepts a single string, examines
               it for blanks as break points, then divides it into array
               elements for display with word wrap. Also presents a PASCAL
               program for IBM PC compatibles, called SERIAL.PAS, which
               uses the undocumented DOS function 69h to set or get the
               serial number present on any disk FORMATted with DOS 4.0 or
               5.0. Both these programs are available for downloading from
               PC MagNet. Includes 2 program listings.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI07-051
       Author: Ricciardi, Sal
        Title: Reclaiming disk space in Paradox: a script that compresses
               your Paradox tables; Changing the case: macros that change
               the case of a ...
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1992) v11 n13 p491-492
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: COMPR.SC
     Abstract: Presents two program listings for IBM PC compatibles, a
               Paradox language program called COMPR.SC which reclaims disk
               space formerly occupied by deleted Paradox records, and a
               FoxPro program which converts a word in FoxPro's editor from
               lower to upper case. In the first case, this may become
               necessary since Paradox attempts to reuse the space of
               deleted records by marking them, rather than physically
               deleting them. The FoxPro program can easily be modified to
               convert from upper to lower case. These two programs are
               available on PC MagNet for downloading. Includes 3 program
               listings.
Descriptor(s): Database; Utility Program; Program Listing
Compatibility: IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI06-053
       Author: Antonoff, Michael Grunin, Lori
        Title: Capture and conversion the Windows way
       Source: PC Magazine (June 16, 1992) v11 n11 p245-281
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Media Cybernetics
 Product Name: HALO Desktop Imager
     Abstract: Presents reviews of ten Windows screen capture and
               conversion utilities priced from $49 to $149.95. Although
               Windows has a built-in screen capture facility, to use the
               captured image requires a program with a paste command to
               transfer the image from the clipboard to a graphics file.
               Programs reviewed are rated on their ability to manipulate
               color, convert files (number of formats supported), process
               images, print, and capture screens. Most vendors of the
               programs reviewed recommend using a display adapter that
               supports more than 16 colors but since these drivers are not
               standardized, they don't guarantee compatibility. Users
               should ask the vendor about compatibility with specific
               adapters. Includes a buyer's guide comparing features. A
               sidebar by Robin Raskin compares DOS and Windows capture
               programs. HALO Desktop Imager ($139) from Media Cybernetics
               Inc. is "Editors' Choice." Includes 11 illustrations, ten
               scr! een display, two tables, one photo.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Window Software; Software Review; Vendor
               Guide; Conversions
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI03-180
       Author: Pandya, Vikram
        Title: Reboot routine -- Languages
       Source: PC Magazine (March 17, 1992) v11 n5 p439
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: REBOOT.BAS
     Abstract: Presents a QuickBASIC program called REBOOT.BAS sent in by
               PC Magazine reader Vikram Pandya, which he uses to reboot a
               PC from within a BASIC program. Includes a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing; Basic
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 92PI03-179
       Author: Ricciardi, Sal
        Title: Databases
       Source: PC Magazine (March 17, 1992) v11 n5 p437-438
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: DD.SC
     Abstract: Presents a Paradox program called DD.SC which creates a
               table structure dictionary for a current dictionary.
               Features a description of the program. Also features DD
               report samples to supplement the discussion. Includes a
               table and a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Dictionaries; Database; Program Listing; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI11-210
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: The first DOS 5.0 utility: UBMFILES frees up extra RAM --
               This issue's utility is one of the first programs to make
               use of upper memory blocks. In doing so, it can free up as
               much as 15K...
       Source: PC Magazine (November 26, 1991) v10 n20 p497-502
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents UMBFILES, a utility which can load
               the DOS System File Table (SFT) into high memory on 386 and
               486 systems configured for loading programs and device
               drivers into the high memory area (HMA). Includes a listing
               of the program, written in assembly language, and describes
               how the program works. The program can free up to 15K of RAM
               for application use (this is the amount of RAM required for
               a SFT created by the statement FILES=255 in CONFIG.SYS).
               Includes one illustration.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; DOS; Tutorial; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI10-052
       Author: Simon, Barry
        Title: Squeeze play -- Data compression utilities aren't just for
               modem users trying to cut the cost of their phone bills. Any
               one of these six inexpensive...
       Source: PC Magazine (October 15, 1991) v10 n17 p291-320
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: PC Magnet
 Product Name: LHA
     Abstract: Presents a tutorial on file compression utilities, with
               reviews of six program ranging in price from free to $89.95.
               Includes a brief history of the development of these
               programs beginning with ARC, released by System Enhancement
               Associates in 1985. A sidebar describes several archive
               shells, and another sidebar lists pros and cons of 13 data
               compression alternatives. Discusses the advantages of using
               compression programs with compressed graphics formats. Notes
               that for modem transmission of data, it is more efficient to
               transmit .ZIP files with MNP 5 off than to transmit .ZIP
               files with MNP 5 on or uncompressed files with MNP 5 on.
               Includes a buyer's guide comparing features of the programs
               reviewed and a benchmark test comparing performance. LHA
               version 2.12 (free), available on BBSs and PC MagNet's
               Utilforum, is the "Editors' Choice." Includes two
               illustrations, two screen displays, four tables, one graph.
Descriptor(s): Compression; Utility Program; Vendor Guide; Software Review;
               Benchmark Testing
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI08-068
       Author: Shaw, Richard Hale
        Title: WINCOLOR.EXE: maximum color control in Windows --
               WINCOLOR.EXE lets you properly display and set custom colors
               for more Windows components than you can through the Control
               Panel.
       Source: PC Magazine (August 1, 1991) v10 n14 p411-418
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: WINCOLOR.EXE
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents WINCOLOR.EXE, a utility program
               for customizing color sets under Windows. Although colors
               can be customized through the Control Panel, the colors
               selected are not always the same as those displayed in real
               windows after exiting the Control Panel. Additionally, the
               Control Panel does not allow setting the colors of
               highlighted menu items and their text, the text of
               unselectable menu items, push buttons, system icons, scroll
               bar arrows, or minimize/maximize buttons. WINCOLOR gives the
               ability to change all these items and view the changes as
               they are made. Includes a description of the program's menu
               items, how to use the program, and how it works. Includes
               one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Window Software; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI08-064
       Author: Murphy, Paul
        Title: Artful assistants: three graphics utilities for Windows and
               PM -- Windows and Presentation Manager users often need to
               snap screens, convert graphics between formats, or reduce
               image to monochrome...
       Source: PC Magazine (August 1, 1991) v10 n14 p363-389
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Computer Presentations
 Product Name: ImagePrep
     Abstract: Presents reviews of three GUI graphics utilities, rating
               them on their abilities to perform screen capture, file
               conversion, and image processing. Includes a listing of
               several programs which can provide only screen capture
               capability. Provides a buyer's guide comparing features of
               programs reviewed. A sidebar by Barry Simon describes three
               programs which can aid in organizing large numbers of
               graphics files by making thumbnails of them and storing
               these in libraries. ImagePrep version 3.1 ($295) from
               Computer Presentations Inc., Cincinnati, OH (513) is the
               "Editors' Choice." Includes five illustrations, four screen
               displays, two tables.
Descriptor(s): Graphics; Window Software; OS/2; Utility Program; Software
               Review; Vendor Guide
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI06-079
       Author: Deurbrouck, John
        Title: Track down your PATH problems with CHKPATH.COM -- Same-named
               programs on your PATH can produce unpredictable results.
               This utility will show you where such .COM, .EXE, and .BAT
               files...
       Source: PC Magazine (June 11, 1991) v10 n11 p367-376
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: CHKPATH.COM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents CHKPATH.COM, a utility for
               troubleshooting the DOS PATH. The program can be set to
               search specified drives, to list all executable files it
               finds, to pause between screens, and to display all file
               information or to ignore date, time, and size information.
               In the case of files with duplicate names, the program will
               advise the user which of the files will actually be executed
               when the command name is typed. Output can be directed to a
               printer or to a file. Includes a discussion of programming
               techniques used in writing the program for the edification
               of programmers. Includes instructions for obtaining a copy
               of the program by downloading it from PC MagNet. Includes
               one figure.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Troubleshooting; DOS; Programming
               Instruction
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI05-155
       Author: Dickinson, Robert
        Title: Get control over your WIN.INI file with PROGSET.EXE -- This
               handy Windows utility lets you clean out the WIN.INI
               modifications made by discarded applications.
       Source: PC Magazine (May 28, 1991) v10 n10 p355-360
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: PROGSET.EXE
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents PROGSET.EXE, a utility for
               managing the WIN.INI Windows file. Each application
               installed under Windows usually modifies part of the WIN.INI
               file but when old applications are removed, they do not
               remove the modification. This program allows cleaning up the
               file without the possibility of corrupting it. Includes a
               tutorial on WIN.INI and its use of file associations.
               Provides instructions on using the utility and describes
               some of the programming techniques used in it. Includes one
               screen display, two figures.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Window Software; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI05-075
       Author: Shaw, Richard Hale
        Title: Restore your Windows 3.0 sessions with WINSAVER.EXE
       Source: PC Magazine (May 14, 1991) v10 n9 p391-393
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: WINSAVER.EXE
     Abstract: UTILITIES COLUMN presents WINSAVER.EXE, a utility that can
               be used to restore applications and utilities that were in
               use when Windows 3.0 was last exited. When active, it
               displays the names of programs which were being run as well
               as the arrangement of their windows and icons. It does not,
               however, remember the state of the programs that were
               running. Describes how the program works and provides
               information on some of its limitations. Includes one screen
               display.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Window Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI04-176
       Author: Holmes, Michael Flanders, Bob
        Title: Finding and changing to the directory you want, with CDX.COM
        [author note: this is one of many early DOS programs that
          cannot handle a path/subpath string wider than 64 characters]
       Source: PC Magazine (April 30, 1991) v10 n8 p361-370
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: CDX.COM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents CDX.COM, a utility that can be
               used to change directories without the requirement of
               specifying the names of intervening subdirectories. It scans
               the directory structures of several or all drives for the
               directory or file desired, displays matches found one at a
               time until the desired directory is displayed, then places
               the user in that directory. Explains the command syntax for
               the program, gives examples of commands which may be used,
               and provides a brief description of how the program works.
               Includes instructions for downloading a copy of the program
               from PC MagNet or receiving it by fax or mail. A sidebar
               gives directions for compiling CDX.C with Microsoft C 6.0.
               Includes one illustration.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Directories
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI04-077
       Author: Chaney, Scott
        Title: Automate your program operations with ENCORE.COM --
               Repeating the same menu-choice sequences over and over can
               be a thing of the past with this task macro generator.
       Source: PC Magazine (April 16, 1991) v10 n7 p327-342
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: ENCORE.COM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents ENCORE.COM, a utility program than
               can be used to record a series of keystrokes and pauses
               between them necessary to perform a task. The program loads
               itself into memory as a TSR requiring approximately 1K of
               memory, and can record up to 100 keystrokes. The number of
               keystrokes can be increase through use of a switch, with
               each keystroke requiring 5 bytes of buffer memory. Describes
               how the program works and provides suggestions for how to
               use it. A sidebar describes how to change the program's
               hotkeys. Includes instructions for obtaining the program by
               downloading from PCMagNet, by mail, or by fax. Includes two
               tables.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Template; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI04-030
       Author: Levin, Carol
        Title: Utility add-ins: something for everyone -- These eight
               time-saving add-ins make 1-2-3 more efficient by letting you
               customize as much as your budget and PC memory allow.
       Source: PC Magazine (April 16, 1991) v10 n7 p137-164
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Symantec; Intex Solutions
 Product Name: Norton Utilities, The; Rescue Plus
     Abstract: Presents reviews of eight utility add-ins for Lotus 1-2-3
               Release 2.2. Because the collection reviewed is so diverse,
               none of the products is named "Editor's Choice" but most of
               them "do their job simply and well." A sidebar by Ed
               Perratore provides comparative reviews of the spreadsheet
               file recovery capabilities of The Norton Utilities version
               5.0 ($179) from Symantec Corp., Cupertino, CA (408) and
               Rescue Plus version 1.3 ($149.95) from Intex Solutions Inc.,
               Needham, MA (617). Includes one illustration, seven screen
               displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Add-on; Spreadsheet; Software Review
Compatibility: Lotus 1-2-3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI04-013
       Author: Stinson, Craig
        Title: Lotus 1-2-3 add-ins: building the perfect spreadsheet -- The
               vast Lotus aftermarket provides software to make the
               spreadsheet you have do just about anything you want. This
               overview covers ...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 16, 1991) v10 n7 p101-164
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: A special section dealing with add-in programs for Lotus
               1-2-3 release 2.2. Includes "Building the perfect
               spreadsheet" (p101-104), an overview of the section;
               "Financial add-ins: a wealth of spreadsheet shortcuts"
               (p105-116) by Mike Falkner, reviews of six financial
               add-ins; "Forecasting add-ins: garbage in, gospel out"
               (p119-124) by Jack McGrath, reviews of four fore add-ins;
               "Optimizing add-ins: the educated guess" (p127-132) John C.
               Nash, reviews of three optimizers; and "Utility add-
               something for everyone" (p137-164), reviews of eight utility
               add-ins. A sidebar by Jim Seymour examines the history of
               development of Lotus 1-2-3 add-ins, and another sidebar by
               describes Add-In Toolkit for 1-2-3 Release 3.0 and Add-In
               Toolkit for 1-2-3 Release 3.1 ($395 each), two add-in
               development packages from Lotus Development Corp.,
               Cambridge, MA (617). Includes eight illustrations, ! 20
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Spreadsheet; Finances; Forecasting; Add-on; Software Review;
               Optimization; Utility Program
Compatibility: Lotus 1-2-3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI03-173
       Author: Adler, Marc
        Title: Create and customize your own icons for Windows 3.0
       Source: PC Magazine (March 26, 1991) v10 n6 p345-357
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents IKE, a utility program which can
               be used to edit icons in Windows 3.0. Icons created by IKE
               can be used in the Program Manager to represent a program,
               but they cannot be used by an application when it is in a
               minimized state. The program provides a selection of drawing
               tools and supports a palette of 16 colors. Describes how the
               program works and how icon files are read and written and
               how icons are displayed. Concludes with a brief discussion
               of ways in which IKE might be enhanced. Includes some brief
               excerpts of C code from IKE's source files to illustrate
               creating a brush or displaying a button. Includes one screen
               display.
Descriptor(s): Icon; Utility Program; Window Software; Tutorial;
               Programming Instruction
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI03-160
       Author: Seymour, Jim
        Title: System setup: the inside story -- What's going on in your
               PC? These 11 system setup and reporting utilities illuminate
               the configuration of your components and...
       Source: PC Magazine (March 26, 1991) v10 n6 p273-316
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Merrill & Bryan; Quarterdeck Office Systems
 Product Name: InfoSpotter; Manifest
     Abstract: Presents reviews of 11 system setup and reporting utilities.
               These programs can be valuable assets to corporate PC
               managers by providing detailed configuration data on a large
               base of installed computers and expediting upgrades when
               required. Configuration information is also useful when
               working with technical support personnel to solve problems.
               Includes a buyer's guide comparing features of the packages
               reviewed. A sidebar by Barry Simon describes three shareware
               system reporting utilities available on PC MagNet. Includes
               a glossary of setup and configuration terms. InfoSpotter
               version 2.5 ($79.95) from Merrill & Bryan, San Diego, CA
               (619) and Manifest version 1.01 ($59.95) from Quarterdeck
               Office Systems, Santa Monica, CA (213) are "Editors'
               Choice." Includes one photo, 12 illustrations, one table, 11
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Diagnostics; Systems Integration; Software
               Review; Vendor Guide; Definitions
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI03-070
       Author: Cooper, Stephen D
        Title: 2FILE and 2FLOPPY let you DISKCOPY by modem -- When you need
               to send an exact disk image or duplicate floppies on a
               one-floppy system, this set of utilities is the only
               sensible answer
       Source: PC Magazine (March 12, 1991) v10 n5 p369-376
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: 2FILE; 2FLOPPY
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents two programs for use with floppy
               disks. 2FILE creates a sector-by-sector image of the
               contents of a floppy disk as a file on a hard disk. This
               file, which can be compressed, can then be transferred to a
               remote site by modem. The companion program 2FLOPPY, takes
               the file on the hard disk and reconstructs its contents onto
               a floppy disk, verifying it after each track if desired.
               2FLOPPY can be used to expedite multiple duplication of a
               floppy disk on a system with only one floppy drive. Includes
               a tutorial on diskette types, file allocation table values,
               and the layout of a root directory. Includes a description
               of how the programs work and instructions for downloading
               them via modem from PC MagNet. Includes four figures.
Descriptor(s): Disk Duplicator; Diskettes; Utility Program; Floppy Disk
               Drive; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Database: InternetPCAbs
Query: (so: pc and so: magazine) and (de= "utility program") not ((pt:
software and pt: review))

   Record No.: 91PI02-158
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: MBOOT.COM: a multiple boot program for your PC -- Now you
               can select from among several configurations and operating
               system versions each time you boot up.
       Source: PC Magazine (February 26, 1991) v10 n4 p359-373
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: MBOOT.COM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents MBOOT.COM, a utility that can be
               used to select from up to four different operating systems
               (one of which can be OS/2) with up to four different CONFIG
               and AUTOEXEC files. Includes a tutorial on what happens when
               a computer boots up and how MBOOT works. A sidebar describes
               how to download MBOOT, as well as other programs, from PC
               MagNet via modem. Includes a caveat recommending that,
               although the assembly language source code is available from
               PC MagNet, not even experienced programmers attempt to
               modify it since the program modifies the boot record of a
               hard disk. Includes three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Operating Systems; Utility Program; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI02-117
       Author: Unger, Tom
        Title: Windows your way: 41 utilities for Windows 3.0 -- PC
               Magazine reviews over 40 utilities that make Windows more
               versatile, more productive, and quite simply, more useful.
       Source: PC Magazine (February 26, 1991) v10 n4 p135-199
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: METZ Software; Publishing Technologies; Okna; Inner Media;
               Softbridge Microsystems
 Product Name: METZ Task Manager; Pubtech File Organizer; DeskTop Set;
               WideAngle; Bridge Tool Kit
     Abstract: Presents reviews of 41 utilities for Windows 3.0. Includes
               reviews of six program management utilities by Paul Murphy,
               four file management utilities by Ronni Geist and Harry
               Geist, four accessories by Tom Unger, one screen enhancer by
               Barry Simon, three macro utilities by M. David Stone, two
               text editors by Barry Simon, two icon editors by Laura Cox,
               and one network utility by Rock Miller. METZ Task Manager
               ($30) from METZ Software, Bellevue, WA (800, 206); Pubtech
               File Organizer ($199.95) from Publishing Technologies Inc.,
               Austin, TX (800, 512); DeskTop Set ($149) from Okna Corp.,
               Lyndhurst, NJ (201); Bridge Tool Kit ($695) from Softbridge
               Inc., Cambridge, MA (800, 617); WideAngle ($129) from Inner
               Media Inc., Hollis, NH (800, 603); and Windows Workstation
               ($695) from Automated Design Systems Inc., Atlanta, GA (800,
               404) are "Editor's Choice." 19 others are described but not
               reviewed. Includes one illustration,! 27 screen displays,
               four tables.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Window Software; Software Review; Vendor
               Guide
        Grade: A A A A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI02-055
       Author: Rosch, Winn L
        Title: Handle your expense account the easy way with JOURNAL.COM --
               This handy utility not only helps you keep track of expenses
               and lets you know then they're big enough to submit, but
               gives you...
       Source: PC Magazine (February 12, 1991) v10 n3 p337-349
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: JOURNAL.COM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents JOURNAL.COM, a utility which can
               be used to record expense data on an as-occurring basis. It
               also includes a calendar and appointment scheduler.
               Cumulative totals of expenses by category can be displayed
               at the touch of a key, and once totals become large enough
               to submit for payment, the program can print out a report
               for submission. Includes a discussion of how the program
               works and a list of commands used with it. A sidebar
               describes how to customize the program, another sidebar
               describes how the program does decimal addition. Includes
               instructions for downloading the program by modem from PC
               MagNet. Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Finances; Utility Program; Scheduling; Calendar; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 91PI01-280
       Author: Munro, Jay
        Title: LZSELECT: laser printer control the easy way -- Without
               every figuring out an escape code, you can set up your
               LaserJet to print exactly the way you want.
       Source: PC Magazine (January 29, 1991) v10 n2 p347-354
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a description of LZSELECT, a
               program which can be used to control a LaserJet or
               compatible printer. When used as a standalone program, or
               with the SETUP2 utility, it provides a menu-driven system
               for setting up a LaserJet. Describes how the program works
               and how to use it. Sidebars describe combining ESC commands
               using the PCL language using printer macros. Includes
               instructions for downloading LZSELECT from PC MagNet. The
               LAB NOTES column (p335-346) in this issue provides a more
               detailed description of the PCL language. Includes one
               figure, four screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Laser Printer; Utility Program; Programming Aids
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI12-210
       Author: Adler, Marc
        Title: Finding our files in Windows 3.0 with WINWHERE -- This handy
               Windows file finder eliminates the painful process of
               searching through individual drives and directories to
               locate...
       Source: PC Magazine (December 25, 1990) v9 n22 p397-404
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: WINWHERE
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents WINWHERE, a file finding utility
               for use with Windows 3.0. The program allows searching for
               files with a file specification which can be either a
               complete filename or a filename containing ? and *
               wildcards. The search can be limited by file date and size
               if desired. Provides instructions for downloading the
               program from PC MagNet, for installing in on a system, and
               for using it. Includes a tutorial describing how the program
               operates and includes an excerpt of the C code used in the
               program. Includes five figures.
Descriptor(s): Window Software; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI12-076
       Author: Gerrold, David
        Title: Free your VGA from CGA captivity with PRISM.EXE -- Here's a
               utility that allows you to set each of the 16 colors on your
               Video Graphics Array to any of 262,144 shades.
       Source: PC Magazine (December 11, 1990) v9 n21 p463-480
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents PRISM.EXE, a utility program which
               can be used to create custom color palettes by modifying the
               16 basic DOS color attributes. The program can be used
               either with the keyboard or with a mouse and the column
               describes both modes of operation. A sidebar describes the
               evolution of display standards from CGA through VGA, and
               another sidebar describes the effects of altering the
               saturation and intensity of colors. Includes instructions
               for downloading PRISM.EXE, which is written in Turbo Pascal,
               from PC MagNet. Notes that since PRISM is a text mode only
               utility, it will not run under Windows or DESQview. Includes
               one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Color Display; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI11-127
       Author: Shaw, Richard Hale
        Title: WSMOOTH: scroll through text files under Windows 3.0 --
               Introducing WSMOOTH: our first Windows utility whose
               keyboard/mouse interface employs the best of Windows' own
               video technology...
       Source: PC Magazine (November 13, 1990) v9 n19 p485-520
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column present WSMOOTH, a program for scrolling
               through text files under Windows 3.0. The program is a
               version of SMOOTH.COM which was presented in the February
               14, 1989 issue of PC Magazine. WSMOOTH supports use of a
               mouse and is compatible with all three operating modes of
               Windows 3.0. Includes a description of how the program works
               and how to use it. Includes listings of the programs used by
               WSMOOTH as well as a source code listing of WSMOOTH.C.
               Includes 11 figures.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Window Software; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI10-270
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: CARDFILE for the PM: It's time to retire your Rolodex --
               More than an update of our popular DOS utility, the PM
               version of CARDFILE shows why we'll all be more productive
               with OS/2.
       Source: PC Magazine (October 30, 1990) v9 n18 p361-376
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a description of PMCARD, a Rolodex
               utility program for OS/2 Presentation Manager. Similar to an
               earlier published utility, CARDFILE (for DOS), it allows
               storing names, addresses, and telephone numbers in a file.
               The file can be searched, data can be cut and pasted between
               entries or into other PM applications, and the program can
               dial phone numbers. The program requires OS/2 Version 1.2 or
               later. Includes a discussion of configuration options of the
               program and a description of the memory management scheme
               used in the program. A sidebar provides instructions for
               downloading the program, as well as its source code, from PC
               MagNet. Includes three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Desktop Software; OS/2; Utility Program
Compatibility: OS/2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI11-148
       Author: Duncan, Ray
        Title: Power Programming -- Arithmetic routines for your computer
               programs, part 1
       Source: PC Magazine (November 14, 1989) v8 n19 p423-429
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: POWER PROGRAMMING column presents proven routines written in
               assembly that handles aritmetic operations on the following
               subjects; single- and double-precision integer arithmetic,
               development of a library of variable precision arithmetic
               routines, and an examination of the capabilities of the
               80x87 numeric coprocessor. Includes assembly source code
               listing for the following; double-precision multiplication
               for the 8086, 8088,80286, and 80386 and accepts two 32-bit
               arguments, another multiplication routine for 80386 in
               32-bit protected mode and accepts 64-bi arguments, a
               double-precision division routine that accept dividend and
               32-bit divisor returning 32-bit qoutient and remainder,
               another division routine that accepts a 128-bit dividend and
               64-bi divisor returning 64-bit qoutient and divisor.
Descriptor(s): Assembly Language; Mathematics; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI11-147
       Author: Petzold, Charles
        Title: Environments -- Understanding and using Bezier Splines in
               OS/2 graphics
       Source: PC Magazine (November 14, 1989) v8 n19 p409-420
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: ENVIRONMENTS column presents the Bezier Splines built-in
               support offered by the Graphics Programming Interface (GPI)
               component of the OS/2 Presentation Manager. Explains the
               use, how to use, drawing function, characteristics, and
               mathematical representation of Bezier Splines. Includes code
               listing of how to automate the creation of a Bezier.Exe.
               file. Contains three diagrams
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Geometry; OS/2; Presentation Graphics
Compatibility: OS/2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI11-146
       Author: Maclean, Pete
        Title: Utilities -- 1st Class and Couriers make binary transfers
               easy
       Source: PC Magazine (November 14, 1989) v8 n19 p399-408
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a set of instructions that makes
               possible the transmission of binary files over MCI Mail. The
               code gets connected to the MCI Mail by first invoking
               Couriers, a memory-resident COM port driver; and 1st Class,
               the PC Magazine eletronic MCI Mail agent that automate the
               MCI connection procedure. Also says that the technique
               serves as an alternative to Lotus Express, another MCI Mail
               interface program. Includes a lis to customize a 1st
               Class.CSF script file. Has sidebars on the following;
               explanation of 1stClass's script language, how to create and
               edit a script file, and directions how to access PC
               Magazine' published programs through modem. Contains one
               diagram
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Electronic Mail; Data Transmission
Compatibility: MCI Mail
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI08-108
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: Compile your batch files for added speed with BAT2EXEC --
               Large batch files often run annoyingly slowly. Compiling
               them with BAT2EXEC will increase both your productivity and
               satisfaction.
       Source: PC Magazine (August 1, 1990) v9 n14 p415-427
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a listing of BAT2EXEC, a program
               which compiles batch files for faster execution. Includes a
               discussion of the differences between interpreted programs
               and compiled programs, the latter of which contains only the
               machine language instructions necessary to run the program,
               making it much faster in execution. Illustrates what
               BAT2EXEC does by providing listings of COPYFILE.BAT, an
               interpreted program, and COPYFILE.ASM, the assembly language
               program produced by running COPYFILE.BAT through BAT2EXEC.
               Includes a listing of BAT2EXEC.BAS, the BASIC program, and
               provides instructions on downloading the program from PC
               MagNet.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI08-107
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: Exploring and organizing your hard disk with Lotus's
               Magellan -- One of the few "must have" utilities for every
               power user, Magellan 2.0 adds new power and flexibility.
       Source: PC Magazine (August 1, 1990) v9 n14 p407-412
    Pub. Type: Column
 Company Name: Lotus Development
 Product Name: Magellan
     Abstract: LAB NOTES column presents a tutorial on the use of Magellan
               2.0, from Lotus Development, to manage hard disk files.
               Includes numerous examples of how to use the program to
               search for files, organize the directory structure of a hard
               disk, build menu systems, and store information from floppy
               disks. Notes that Magellan can replace a large number of
               separate utilities, including DOS shells, file browsers,
               file finders, PKZIP and PKUNZIP (included in Magellan),
               directory tree managers such as PRUNE and KILLDIR, file
               comparison programs such as DIFF, MOVEFILE utilities, file
               undeletion utilities, cyclic redundancy check utilities that
               check files for modification, and word processor conversion
               utilities. Includes one table, one illustration, three
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Information Retrieval; Utility Program; Disk Files; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI10-182
       Author: Munro, Jay
        Title: PCBOOK makes your LaserJet print files in booklet form --
               The painless way to handle README and similar files is to
               turn them automatically into handy booklets.
       Source: PC Magazine (October 16, 1990) v9 n17 p425-444
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a discussion of PCBOOK, a utility
               program that converts README and similar files into booklet
               form on a LaserJet Series II, IIP, or III. The program works
               with regular text or ASCII files and prints four 80
               characters per line by 66 line pages on two sides of a
               standard 8 1/2 by 11 sheet of paper. A single fold of the
               resulting pages produces a 5 1/2 by 8 1/2 inch booklet.
               Describes how the program works and lists the options
               available within the program. A sidebar describes ways of
               customizing the program, and another sidebar describes
               LaserJet escape sequences. Includes instructions for
               obtaining the .EXE file and the source code (in QuickBASIC)
               by modem, mail, or fax. Includes one illustration.
Descriptor(s): Desktop Publishing; Utility Program; Laser Printer
Compatibility: HP LaserJet II; HP Laserjet IIP
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI09-240
       Author: Nadkarni, Ashok P
        Title: CMDEDIT: the PC Magazine DOS command-line editor -- Whatever
               your level of expertise, this utility offers you a host of
               ways to make your interface with the DOS prompt more
               efficient.
       Source: PC Magazine (September 25, 1990) v9 n16 p447-458
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents CMDEDIT, a DOS command line
               editing utility. The program provides automatic insertion of
               often-used commands (up to 254 characters) from a symbol
               file, executing commands or inserting character sequences by
               using function keys, recalling commands from a command
               history file for editing or execution, and rapid navigation
               of disks and directories. It allows defining a sequence of
               command lines as a macro, and can display currently defined
               macros and symbols from the DOS prompt. A sidebar describes
               how to prepare an initialization file, and another sidebar
               lists the error messages the program may display and the
               corrective actions to be taken. Includes instructions on
               downloading the program from PC MagNet. Includes two tables.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Editor; DOS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI09-015
       Author: Murray, Rink
        Title: Norton Backup, Version 1.1
       Source: PC Magazine (September 11, 1990) v9 n15 p54
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Peter Norton Computing
 Product Name: Norton Backup, The
     Abstract: Reports that Peter Norton Computing of Santa Monica, CA
               (213) has released Norton Backup v. 1.1 ($149; upgrade
               free), an upgraded backup utility that includes enhanced
               features such as improved speed, more efficient data
               compression, a new command line restore feature, and
               expanded hardware and software compatibility.
Descriptor(s): Backup; Utility Program; Upgrade
Compatibility: IBM PC; IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI06-163
       Author: Mefford, Michael J
        Title: Trim the branches of your directory trees with PRUNE.COM --
               What lopping shears and grafting tools do to uncontrolled
               growth in your garden, PRUNE can accomplish for your hard
               disk.
       Source: PC Magazine (June 26, 1990) v9 n12 p361-398
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: PRUNE.COM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents PRUNE, a program designed for disk
               directory management. The program can be used to copy,
               rename, remove, or move a directory. It also includes DR.COM
               and DIRMATCH, two utility programs which have been
               previously published in this column. Includes a discussion
               of how the program operates. A sidebar discusses methods of
               customizing the program for displays that don't display
               color contrasts clearly. Provides listings of PRUNE.COM in
               assembly language and BASIC. Includes two screen displays,
               one illustration.
Descriptor(s): Directories; Disk Files; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI06-118
       Author: Howard, Bill
        Title: The ultimate utility bookshelf -- Thirty-three powerful
               programs that recover files, make sense of DOS commands,
               speed your hard disk, find files and text, enhance...
       Source: PC Magazine (June 26, 1990) v9 n12 p165-200
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
     Abstract: Presents reviews of the 33 best utility programs for the PC.
               These utilities were selected by the editors of PC magazine
               based on six months of consideration using electronic mail
               and through face-to-face discussions. Input was also
               provided by readers through PC MagNet. Utilities chosen were
               "mainstream products that solve a range of common problems."
               Presents recommendations for a "starter kit" of utilities,
               based on user needs. A sidebar by Edward Mendelson describes
               thirteen single-task utilities available from PC MagNet.
               Utilities reviewed include five for communications and
               connectivity, three for memory management, two for
               diagnostics and setup, five disk utilities, seven DOS tools,
               three for graphics, two for keyboards, two for printers, two
               for screen handling, and four for text handling. Includes
               seven illustrations, 11 screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Software Review; Vendor Guide
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI05-272
       Author: Neuhaus, Trudy Shaw, Richard Hale
        Title: PARAVIEW, a Paradox Engine application -- The hardest part
               is getting started. This utility sets the stage for adding
               functionality to your database applications using C...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 29, 1990) v9 n10 p401-413
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: PARAVIEW
     Abstract: DATABASES colum presents a listing of PARAVIEW, a Paradox
               Engine application which can be used to read, display, and
               update table records and navigate the tables on-screen.
               Includes a description of the capabilities of the program
               and an explanation of how it works. Includes the source code
               for the program. Readers who desire to add capabilities to
               PARAVIEW will require Turbo C 2.0 and Paradox Engine 1.0.
               Includes one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Data Base Management; Utility Program; Tutorial
Compatibility: Turbo C; Paradox Engine
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI05-248
       Author: Poor, Alfred
        Title: Network printing without pain -- While it's true that
               NetWare comes with its own utilities for managing printers
               on a LAN, it's also true that you can do much...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 29, 1990) v9 n10 p265-290
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Software Directions
 Product Name: PrintQ LAN
     Abstract: Presents comparative reviews of seven utility programs
               designed to make printer sharing more efficient on an
               Advanced NetWare LAN. Despite the fact that NetWare provides
               basic printer sharing capability, these utilities address
               two weaknesses inherent in NetWare's printer sharing--the
               fact that all shared printers must be attached to the file
               server, and the requirement to issue NetWare's CAPTURE and
               ENDCAP commands at the DOS prompt. A sidebar presents brief
               discussions of other packages that can assist with LAN
               printing. Includes a buyer's guide comparing features of the
               programs reviewed and a benchmark test. PrintQ LAN, version
               .96 ($495 for 20 users), from Software Directions Inc.,
               Randolph, NJ (800, 201) is an "Editor's Choice." Includes
               one illustration, one table, eight graphs.
Descriptor(s): Printer Controller; Local Area Networks; Utility Program;
               Spooler; Vendor Guide; Benchmark Testing; Software Review
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI10-160
       Author: Smtih, Ron Q
        Title: Create colorful, interactive menus for your applications
       Source: PC Magazine (October 31, 1989) v8 n18 p319-332
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: MENU
     Abstract: UTILITIES column provides programming tips on how to create
               an interactive menu with the screen displays and keyboard
               input facilities needed for novice users to operate a
               computer. Makes use of MENU, a program that lets users
               display an unlimited amount of information with which the
               user can interact. Includes symbol, function key, and
               editing key tables; program listings; and a sidebar called
               "How to Create a Template File" (p322-323). Includes three
               screen displays.
Descriptor(s): User Interface; Tutorial; Template; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI10-116
       Author: Manes, Stephen
        Title: Our cantankerous columnist finds a program he really
               likes--one that makes no claims to artificial intelligence
               but turns out to be a ...
       Source: PC Magazine (October 31, 1989) v8 n18 p91-92
    Pub. Type: Column
 Company Name: Lotus Development
 Product Name: Magellan
     Abstract: STEPHEN MANES presents a very favorable review of Magellan
               ($NA), a utility program, from Lotus Development Corp.
               States that its most crucial feature is its viewer
               technology; it offers amazingly free-text retrieval; and
               applications can be launched within it. However, notes that
               it has some problems that should be addressed in the next
               version. Still, says the program is so good that operating
               system designers ought to steal its best features. Includes
               one illustration.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Information Retrieval; User Interface;
               Software Review; DOS
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI10-111
       Author: Venditto, Gus
        Title: Utility makers team up for the battles enough
       Source: PC Magazine (October 31, 1989) v8 n18 p63-64
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: PIPELINE column reports that the trends toward mergers and
               acquisitions among PC vendors is about to change the
               landscape of the utilities market. Features a graph showing
               sales rankings of the top ten utility programs over a
               five-week period.
Descriptor(s): Trends; Utility Program; Mergers/Acquisitions; Market
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI11-261
       Author: Mefford, Michael J
        Title: Easy binary file transfer through ASCII text files
       Source: PC Magazine (November 28, 1989) v8 n20 p319-326
    Pub. Type: Column
 Company Name: PC MagNet
 Product Name: DEBUGSCR.ASM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column discusses ways to transfer complicated
               binary files over MCI and other E-mail services. Presents an
               assembly language program called DEBUGSCR.ASM that turns
               binary files into ASCII form transmittable over MCI.
               Available by modem from PC MagNet. Includes one program
               listing and one illustration.
Descriptor(s): Program Listing; Assembly Language; Utility Program; Data
               Transmission
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI02-113
       Author: Cohen, Alan
        Title: FontSpace compresses LaserJet fonts
       Source: PC Magazine (February 27, 1990) v9 n4 p53-54
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Isogon
 Product Name: FontSpace
     Abstract: Report that Isogon Corp. of New York, NY has released
               FontSpace ($89.95), a TSR program which compresses font
               files for LaserJet printers up to 98 percent. Requires 20K
               (3K if EMS is available), hard disk and DOS 3.0 or later. It
               works with all fonts compatible with the LaserJet Plus,
               LaserJet Series II, and LaserJet IID. Contains one screen
               display.
Descriptor(s): Compression; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI02-112
       Author: Cohen, Alan
        Title: RoundTrip automatically creates worksheets
       Source: PC Magazine (February 27, 1990) v9 n4 p53
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Circle Systems
 Product Name: RoundTrip
     Abstract: Reports that Circle Systems of Seattle, WA (206) has
               released RoundTrip ($695), a worksheet building tool.
               Requires 256K of RAM, DOS 2.0 or later, and a hard disk
               (recommended). Says it can automatically generate complete
               Lotus 1-2-3 worksheets and can update and extract data from
               existing worksheets.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Spreadsheet
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI05-166
       Author: MacLean, Pete
        Title: Introducing PAN.COM, the program animator -- With this
               versatile script language utility, you can add opening
               menus, schedule automatic operations, and customize your
               programs'..
       Source: PC Magazine (May 15, 1990) v9 n9 p253-290
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents PAN.COM, a utility designed to
               automate PC applications which is described as "a universal
               script language." Presents instructions for creating the
               program from the source code (requires a macro assembler)
               and describes how the program works. A sidebar presents the
               PAN command set, another sidebar present tips for creating
               scripts, a third sidebar provides programming notes for
               extending PAN, and a fourth sidebar provides instructions
               for downloading PAN from PC MagNet. Includes three sample
               PAN.COM script files, and a complete listing of the assembly
               language source code.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Template; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI04-069
       Author: Winer, Ethan Munro, Jay
        Title: Download utilities the easy way with PCACCESS -- PCACCESS,
               our first utility written entirely in QuickBASIC, shows off
               the communications capabilities and sophistication of the
               ...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 10, 1990) v9 n7 p293-312
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: PCACCESS
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents PCACCESS, a utility program
               written in QuickBASIC which can be used to download files
               from PC MagNet, on CompuServe. Describes how the program
               works and how to use it, and provides a tutorial on the
               communications capabilities available in QuickBASIC.
               Sidebars discuss obtaining PC utilities by modem, describe
               how Xmodem works, provide a tutorial on the CRC protocol,
               and present instructions for adding features to PCACCESS.
               Includes two illustrations, three screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Data Transmission; Online Systems; Telecommunications;
               Utility Program; Tutorial; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI04-156
       Author: Mefford, Michael J
        Title: TYPEFAST and TPFST-AT give your keyboard pizzazz
       Source: PC Magazine (April 24, 1990) v9 n8 p287-293
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a description of two utility
               programs, TYPEFAST and TPFST-AT, which can be used to alter
               the typematic characteristics of the keyboard of an IBM PC
               XT, AT, PS/2, or compatible. TYPEFAST works with all XT and
               later models, while TPFST works with ATs with a BIOS date of
               11/15/85 or later and with XT 286, PS/2 and 386-based PCs
               that are completely AT-compatible. Discusses how the
               programs work and presents instructions for downloading the
               programs and their source code from PC MagNet.
Descriptor(s): Keyboard; Speed; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI04-149
       Author: Raskin, Robin
        Title: Screen-capture software saves the moment -- There's more to
               saving screens to disk than just hitting a hotkey, as
               Collage Plus, The Graphics Link Plus, HiJaak Plus, Hot
               Shot...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 24, 1990) v9 n8 p257-269
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: SymSoft; Application Techniques
 Product Name: HotShot Graphics; Pizazz Plus
     Abstract: Presents a discussion of screen capture utility programs.
               The five major reasons for using such programs are inclusion
               of total screen information in documentation, preparation of
               slide shows, working with nonstandard file formats, image
               enhancements for color printing, and image editing. Screen
               capture programs work well with CGA, EGA, and VGA displays,
               but can present problems when used with Super VGA, 320 by
               200 by 256-color .GIF images, and TIFF images. Includes
               reviews of five "image-capture mainstream" programs, and
               notes that other screen capture utilities are available as
               shareware or included as modules in other software packages.
               A sidebar illustrates the effects achieved using
               screen-capture software. Includes a buyer's guide comparing
               features of packages reviewed. Hot Shot Graphics ($249) from
               SymSoft and Pizazz Plus ($149) from Application Techniques
               are "Editor's Choice." Includes four p! hotos, three screen
               displays, one table.
Descriptor(s): Image Processing; Utility Program; Presentation Graphics;
               Software Review; Vendor Guide; Graphics
        Grade: A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI12-156
       Author: Boling, Douglas Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Give yourself a smart DOS command line with ALIAS
       Source: PC Magazine (December 26, 1989) v8 n22 p253-268
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: ALIAS
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a discussion of ALIAS, a utility
               program that allows word processor-like control over the DOS
               command line. It also keeps track of the last 16 commands
               issued and allows the user to pop them into the command line
               without retyping. Provides instructions for using the
               program and a discussion of how the program works. Includes
               instructions for obtaining ALIAS.COM and its source code by
               modem, mail, or fax, and a listing of other utility programs
               available on PC MagNet which have been upgraded to fix minor
               bugs or system incompatibilities. Includes two tables.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Word Processing; DOS; Tutorial; Program
               Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI06-079
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Importing an AutoCAD drawing; Extended keyboard services;
               Teaching a TSR new tricks
       Source: PC Magazine (June 12, 1990) v9 n11 p383-384
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: TUTOR column explains how to import AutoCAD graphics into
               WordPerfect, how to determine whether a BIOS supports
               extended keyboard functions, and how to write intelligent
               TSRs. Includes a macro.
Descriptor(s): Computer Instruction; Tutorial; Computer Aided Design;
               Graphics; Keyboard; Utility Program; Programming Instruction
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI06-078
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: What day is it? An easier way to use ANSI commands
       Source: PC Magazine (June 12, 1990) v9 n11 p381-382
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: DDATE.BAT; XDATE.BAT; SED.BAT; SE.BAT; SWAP.BAT
     Abstract: USER-TO-USER column presents DDATE.BAT, a macro that uses
               DOS's internal day of the week calculator to determine what
               day of a week a given date will fall on; XDATE.BAT, a macro
               that combines the DDATE and DDATESET functions; SED.BAT, a
               macro that sets up mnemonic environment variables as
               synonyms for useful ANSI commands; SE.BAT, a macro that
               maintains the SED.BAT file and sets the colors users choose;
               and SWAP.BAT, a macro that uses mnemonic ANSI environment
               variables to display an attractive help screen.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Calendar; Color; User Interface; DOS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI06-074
       Author: Hall, William S
        Title: TSR programs and Windows; the multiple document interface
       Source: PC Magazine (June 12, 1990) v9 n11 p367-369
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: WINDOWS column discusses some solutions to the problem of
               running TSRs under Windows, and presents some new libraries
               and tools that will help developers perfect the
               implementation of the multiple documents interface (MDI) in
               future Windows programs. Includes two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Window Software; Memory; Utility Program; Software Tools
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI06-027
       Author: Brown, Bruce
        Title: Playing the DOS shell game -- Cut through the confusion and
               find the right DOS shell by deciding how knowledgeable a
               user you are, how knowledgeable you want to ...
       Source: PC Magazine (June 12, 1990) v9 n11 p185-240
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Central Point Software; Mouse Systems; Micro-Z; Xtree; Lotus
               Development
 Product Name: PC Tools Deluxe; Power Panel; Direc-Tree Plus; Xtree Pro
               Gold; Lotus Magellan
     Abstract: Introduces a section reviewing 14 programs that can act as
               DOS shells. Says they include the classic DOS-shell
               functions of disk and file management, easy DOS command
               usage, and application launching. Examines what a good shell
               should offer. Each product is evaluated on its suitability
               to task, including simplification of DOS usage; file and
               directory management; value as an addition to a user's tool
               set; and customization/automation of frequent operation.
               "Editor's Choice" ratings went to PC Tools Deluxe v6.0
               ($149) from Central Point Software as an overall favorite;
               Power Panel v1.0 ($69.95) from Mouse Systems for novice
               users; and Direc-Tree Plus v5.4 ($49.50) from Micro-Z and
               Xtree Pro Gold v1.31 ($129) from Xtree for power users.
               Sidebar articles discuss DOS shells for portables, the DOS
               4.0 Shell option, and Lotus Magellan ($199). A table
               compares 73 features of each package. Includes fifteen
               screen displays! .
Descriptor(s): User Interface; DOS; Software Review; Vendor Guide; Utility
               Program
        Grade: A A A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI07-062
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Another fix for LASERLST; the NUL device; redirecting
               printer output; distinguishing among CPUs
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1990) v9 n13 p425-426
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: WHATCPU.SCR
     Abstract: TUTOR column presents instructions for modifying code for a
               program that works with LaserJet IIP printers called
               LASERLST.COM, and a utility called WHATCPU.SCR, which
               determines what type of CPU a program is running. Also
               discusses the purpose of the NUL device driver, and how to
               redirect printer output to a file. Includes one listing.
Descriptor(s): Programming Instruction; Tutorial; Laser Printer; Printer
               Controller; Microprocessor; Utility Program; Programming
               Design
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI07-060
       Author: Stark, Craig L
        Title: Increased readability; perfect parallels; checkoff boxes in
               WP
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1990) v9 n13 p415-416
    Pub. Type: Column
 Company Name: Microsoft; WordPerfect
 Product Name: Microsoft Windows; WordPerfect
     Abstract: THE WORKING WORD column discusses how to modify the
               Microsoft Windows palette to make your screen easier to
               read, and what the manual doesn't tell users about creating
               handy forms-oriented items in WordPerfect. Also presents a
               WordPerfect 5.0 macro which can help keep running
               translations straight. Contains one procedure.
Descriptor(s): Word Processing; Window Software; Tutorial; Utility Program;
               Upgrade; User Interface
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI07-055
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: PMVIEW: A Presentation Manager file browser
       Source: PC Magazine (July 1, 1990) v9 n13 p335-371
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: PMVIEW
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents PMVIEW, a Presentation Manager
               file browser that allows users to look at files either as
               ASCII text or in hexadecimal format. Discusses how to
               acquire and use the utility, PM programming, and the
               utility's commands and functions. Contains four screen
               displays and a sidebar that explains how to access PMVIEW by
               modem.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; OS/2
Compatibility: OS/2 Presentation Manager
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI08-063
       Author: Flanders, Bob Holmes, Michael
        Title: Utilities -- Speed up file and loading access: CHKFRAG.EXE
               tells you when it's time to defragment the files on your
               hard disk.
       Source: PC Magazine (August 1, 1989) v8 n14 p355-366
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: CHKFRAG
     Abstract: Presents a C program language listing, called CHKFRAG, which
               reports on-screen the extent of file fragmentation on a hard
               disk and provides an ERRORLEVEL value usable within a batch
               file to call a defragmenting program. Contains one diagram.
Descriptor(s): Hard Disk Drive; Maintenance; Optimization; Utility Program;
               Disk Files
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI12-113
       Author: Dvorak, John C
        Title: Technology horror -- The computer revolution has made many
               of life's chores easier to take. But technology worsens some
               aspects. Take voice mail,...
       Source: PC Magazine (December 26, 1989) v8 n22 p73, 75
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: JOHN C. DVORAK column comments on the disadvantages of voice
               mail systems. Says they mean no accountability, they leave a
               bad impression with anyone who does business with the firm
               that uses them, and this results in lost sales and ill will.
               Calls voice mail systems "the end of civilization." INSIDE
               TRACK column comments on Portable OS/2, a generic OS/2
               written in C, said to be under development at Microsoft.
               Also comments on the Friday the 13th Virus, which was a
               publicity stunt by Wes Thomas, a PR man who was working on
               behalf of a virus newsletter and several virus books on the
               market. Presents a recommendation for Clear for C ($199), a
               utility that creates flowcharts from undocumented source
               code, from Clear Software, Brookline, MA (617).
Descriptor(s): Voice Mail; OS/2; Virus; Corporate Information; Utility
               Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI12-043
       Author: Greenberg, Ross M
        Title: Compress and expand the files on your hard disk
               automatically -- With PCMANAGE and DCOMPRES you can make
               room for all those files you want on hand but don't need
               access to every day.
       Source: PC Magazine (December 12, 1989) v8 n21 p299-326
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a discussion of PCMANAGE and
               DCOMPRES, two utility programs which can be used to compress
               unused files and subsequently decompress them for use. The
               programs utilize the Lempel-Ziv-Walsh (LZW) algorithm to
               compress files by replacing repeated sequences of characters
               by a single code. PCMANAGE will compress any file which has
               not been access in a specified time, and specific file types
               or directories can be excluded from this automatic
               compression. Describes how the programs operate, presents
               suggestions for their use, and provides excerpts of the
               assembly and C source code used in the programs. Includes
               instructions for obtaining copies of these programs via
               modem, mail, or fax, and lists other programs on PC MagNet
               which have been upgraded to fix minor bugs or system
               incompatibilities. Includes five figures.
Descriptor(s): Compression; Utility Program; Disk Files; Tutorial; Program
               Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI03-118
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: DOS utilities save the day -- You have only to erase
               valuable data once to understand why everyone needs a good
               collection of DOS utilities. But unerase is just...
       Source: PC Magazine (March 27, 1990) v9 n6 p97-124
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Fifth Generation Systems; Peter Norton Computing; Central
               Point Software
 Product Name: The Mace Utilities; The Norton Utilities; PC Tools Deluxe
     Abstract: Introduces a special section reviewing five DOS disk
               utilities which function as disaster recovery programs.
               These programs correct common dangers to your disk from
               software or damaging keystrokes. Most automatically recover
               deleted files or lost data, include sector editors which
               modify any byte on your disk, and directory utilities that
               change a file's attributes, data, and its size. Also
               includes a cache, a defragmenter, and a backup program. One
               sidebar article describes how undeleting works and another
               reviews better models of large-scale utilities. Includes a
               features chart that compares 8 considerations of 5
               utilities. Recommended products are: The Mace Utilities
               ($149) from Fifth Generation Systems; The Norton Utilities,
               Advanced Edition ($150) from Peter Norton Computing; and PC
               Tools Deluxe ($129) from Central Point Software.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; DOS; Hard Disk Drive; Disk Files; Vendor
               Guide
        Grade: A A A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI03-117
       Author: Ross, Matthew J
        Title: PC FormFAX lets users create, fill, and fax forms
       Source: PC Magazine (March 27, 1990) v9 n6 p59
    Pub. Type: Product Announcement
 Company Name: Commtech International
 Product Name: PC FormFAX
     Abstract: Reports that Commtech International of Atlanta, GA (800,
               404) has announced PC FormFAX ($89), a memory-resident forms
               utility. States that it allows users to create forms up to
               ten screens long, inputs data into customized fields, and
               faxes the finished product to either fax machines or PCs
               with fax boards.
Descriptor(s): Forms; Utility Program; Facsimile
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI03-102
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: QEMM-386 5.0: finder of lost RAM for 386 systems
       Source: PC Magazine (March 27, 1990) v9 n6 p35
    Pub. Type: Hardware Review
 Company Name: Quarterdeck Office Systems; Qualitas
 Product Name: QEMM-386; 386-to-the-Max
     Abstract: Presents a favorable review of QEMM-386 v5.0 ($99.95), a 386
               memory manager from Quarterdeck Office Systems of Santa
               Monica, CA (213). Runs on a 80386-based computer with DOS
               2.0 or later. Says it makes more RAM available for TSRs and
               expanded memory, and installs the most efficient possible
               configuration elaborately and automatically. Comes with
               Manifest, a system analyzer utility which suggests ways to
               use RAM most efficiently. Recommends careful testing to
               prevent the advanced memory analysis function from using ROM
               BIOS memory addresses. Says that because access to technical
               support difficult, you may want to use a similar product
               instead, like 386-to-the-Max v5.0 from Qualitas. Contains
               one screen display.
Descriptor(s): Memory; Utility Program; Software Review; RAM
        Grade: B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI01-166
       Author: Mefford, Michael J
        Title: Add music, color, and power to your batch files with
               BATCHMAN
       Source: PC Magazine (January 30, 1990) v9 n2 p283-291
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: BATCHMAN
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a discussion of BATCHMAN, a
               utility program which can be used to enhance batch files by
               adding color, musical tones, the capability of performing a
               warm or cold boot, the ability to display system
               information, and determine available memory. A sidebar
               presents instructions for obtaining a copy of BATCHMAN by
               modem, and an address is provided for users who wish to
               obtain a copy by mail or fax.. Includes two tables, one
               illustration.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Color; Music
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: .89PI04-16
       Author: Mefford, Michael J
        Title: Fine-tuning your mouse motion -- Microsoft and IBM mouse
               drivers provide only two-speed mouse action. MOUSECTL lets
               you tailor mouse motion for better drawing control ...
       Source: PC Magazine (April 25, 1989) v8 n8 p261-283
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: MOUSECTL.ASM; MOUSECTL.BAS
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a program in assembly and BASIC
               languages called MOUSECTL that allows you to set multiple
               sensitivity levels for controlling mouse actions in IBM PCs
               and compatibles. Includes a graph and a chart.
Descriptor(s): Mouse; Programming Instruction; Utility Program; Program
               Listing
Compatibility: IBM PC; IBM PC Compatible
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI04-126
       Author: Poor, Alfred
        Title: Battling Babel: word processing format conversion --
               Preserving your formatting commands as you move among word
               processors is the forte of these four format-conversion
               programs.
       Source: PC Magazine (April 25, 1989) v8 n8 p141-155
    Pub. Type: Buyer and Vendor Guide
 Company Name: Systems Compatibility
 Product Name: Software Bridge
     Abstract: Presents a buyer's guide to four word processing format
               conversion programs. Includes the sidebar "A Matter of
               Recognition;" performance test results; and a table
               summarizing the formats supported for the six products. The
               "Editor's Choice" rating goes to Software Bridge v3.11
               ($199) from Systems Compatibility of Chicago, IL (800).
               Includes photos, screen displays, and one graph.
Descriptor(s): Word Processing; Conversions; Utility Program; Software
               Review
Compatibility: IBM PC; IBM PC Compatible
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI02-065
       Author: Stark, Craig L
        Title: Power user
       Source: PC Magazine (February 13, 1990) v9 n3 p319-320
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: POWER USER column explains how to create headings at any
               level in the outlining feature of Microsoft Word and how to
               count words in Microsoft Word when it won't give it to you.
               Also provides the program ALTG.WPM which allows users to
               examine two WordPerfect documents on one screen.
Descriptor(s): Word Processing; Utility Program; Tutorial
Compatibility: Microsoft Word; WordPerfect
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 90PI02-064
       Author: Rubenking, Neil J
        Title: User-to-user
       Source: PC Magazine (February 13, 1990) v9 n3 p315-318
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: USER-TO-USER column explains how to simplify ERRORLEVEL
               tests, and provides a method for detecting viruses and
               repeat batch commands up to 255 times. Contains six
               illustrations.
Descriptor(s): DOS; Utility Program; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI09-152
       Author: Mefford, Michael J
        Title: Update your directories with a keystroke
       Source: PC Magazine (September 26, 1989) v8 n16 p323-347
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: DIRMATCH.ASM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a listing of DIRMATCH.ASM, an
               assembly language program which can produce a side-by-side
               listing of source and target directories, highlighting
               differences between the two. Includes an explanation of how
               the program works and directions for using it to copy, move,
               and print files using the program. A sidebar describes
               methods which can be used to customize the program. Includes
               two screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Directories; Disk Files; Utility Program; Program Listing;
               Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI09-051
       Author: Duncan, Ray
        Title: Configuring OS/2 for your system
       Source: PC Magazine (September 12, 1989) v8 n15 p243-270
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a tutorial on the directives
               available for inclusion in an OS/2 CONFIG.SYS file. Although
               on 10 such directives are available in DOS, version 1.1 of
               OS/2 supports 26 directives, and a CONFIG.SYS file can be 50
               lines or more. Divides these 26 directives into five
               categories for discussion: shell and environment,
               multitasking, protection and memory management,
               internationalization support, and miscellaneous. Presents a
               listing of CONFIG.EXE, a C language program which can be
               used to handle the components of an OS/2 CONFIG.SYS file.
               Includes instruct obtaining CONFIG.EXE by modem. Includes
               one screen display.
Descriptor(s): OS/2; Utility Program; Program Listing; Tutorial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI06-157
       Author: Boling, Douglas
        Title: EMS.SYS expands extended memory -- Living within 640K is
               getting harder every day. If you've got extended memory
               that's only good for VDISK programs, here's how...
       Source: PC Magazine (June 27, 1989) v8 n12 p277-310
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents EMS40.SYS, a device driver that
               allows use of extended memory by making the computer think
               it is expanded memory. Provides listings in both assembly
               language and BASIC which will produce this driver. Includes
               a tutorial on expanded and extended memory, as well as a
               description of how EMS40.SYS works. The program provides all
               LIM EMS 4.0 functions except the DMA functions included in
               the Alternate Map Register Set function. A sidebar discusses
               extended memory management. Includes instructions on getting
               a copy of EMS40.SYS through PCMagNet. Includes four
               illustrations.
Descriptor(s): Memory; Tutorial; Program Listing; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI06-099
       Author: Duncan, Ray
        Title: Using extended memory, part 2 -- Accessing memory in
               protected mode requires a very different addressing system
               from that used by regular DOS programs. The...
       Source: PC Magazine (June 13, 1989) v8 n11 p353-360
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: POWER PROGRAMMING column presents a tutorial on using
               extended memory. Defines a global descriptor table and
               discusses protected-mode memory addresses. Presents two
               assembly language routines, GETXM and PUTXM, which allows C
               programs to transfer data between conventional and extended
               memory as well as SHOWXMEM, a C program which illustrates
               the use of GETXM. Includes four figures.
Descriptor(s): Memory; Tutorial; Program Listing; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI06-098
       Author: Petzold, Charles
        Title: PM functions in non-PM programs -- As a rule, Presentation
               Manager functions can be called only from within PM
               programs. As INISHOW.EXE demonstrates, however, rules...
       Source: PC Magazine (June 13, 1989) v8 n11 p343-350
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: ENVIRONMENTS column presents a tutorial on using
               Presentation Manager functions in non-Presentation Manager
               programs. Notes that use of these functions is limited to PM
               facilities which don't involve windows. Provides three files
               which can be used to produce a program, INISHOW.EXE, which
               can be used to examine the contents of an OS2.INI file. No
               complete listing of PM functions that can be used outside of
               Presentation Manager exists, so experimentation will be
               required to find whether a desired function will work.
               Includes four figures.
Descriptor(s): OS/2; Tutorial; Program Listing; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI06-097
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Putting color in the OS/2 kernel -- The first OS/2 utility
               in this column, COLOR.EXE, lets you dress up your screen
               while using the text-mode applications likely to be...
       Source: PC Magazine (June 13, 1989) v8 n11 p329-338
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a listing of COLOR.EXE, a
               protected-mode utility program for OS/2 1.0 or 1.1 which
               allows selection of foreground and background colors on the
               display. Includes source code listings in both C and
               assembly language and a sidebar discusses the differences
               between the programs they produce. Also includes a listing
               of a BASIC program which can be run as an alternative to
               COLOR.EXE. Provides instructions for obtaining the program
               from PCMagNet. A tutorial describes how the program works.
               Includes one figure.
Descriptor(s): OS/2; Tutorial; Program Listing; Utility Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI06-091
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: New life for old fonts -- More than any other utility, font
               editors let you control your own letterforms, allowing you
               to create new ones or modify the ones...
       Source: PC Magazine (June 13, 1989) v8 n11 p287-292
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: A special section on font editors, which the author defines
               as "the ultimate font utilities." Notes that font editors
               are professional tools, and should be used with professional
               care, lest a normal font be turned into a "grotesque
               absurdity." Includes reviews of four font editor programs.
               Includes four screen displays.
Descriptor(s): Typeface; Desktop Publishing; Software Review; Utility
               Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI06-080
       Author: Mendelson, Edward
        Title: Faster access, more control -- Timesaving utilities like
               font modifiers, installers, and downloaders specialize in
               automating one or more font-preparation...
       Source: PC Magazine (June 13, 1989) v8 n11 p273-282
    Pub. Type: Feature Articles and News
     Abstract: A section devoted to font utilities, which can be used to
               install, modify, and download fonts. Describes some small
               utilities available on BBSs which can be used to obtain
               information about fonts. Includes reviews of ten font
               utility programs. A sidebar describes five grahics programs
               which can be used to manipulate fonts for special effects.
               Includes one illustration.
Descriptor(s): Typeface; Desktop Publishing; Software Review; Utility
               Program
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI02-143
       Author: Flanders, Bob
        Title: File transfers fast and easy -- Moving files between
               machines that lack a common disk format can present a
               formidable challenge. ZCOPY provides the answer with ...
       Source: PC Magazine (February 28, 1989) v8 n4 p251-282
    Pub. Type: Column
 Product Name: ZCOPY
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents ZCOPY, a utility program in that
               transfers files between computers which lack a common medium
               or when the files will not fit on a medium they share. ZCOPY
               differs from DOS's XCOPY in that it does not allow files to
               be renamed in transfer and it does not create subdirectories
               on the destination disk. Describes construction of a
               null-modem cable to allow transfer without a modem. Includes
               instructions for transferring ZCOPY through a null-modem
               cable. Presents representations of the algorithms used by
               ZCOPY to establish data transfer speed, block transfer
               protocols, and intermachine commands. Includes a listing of
               ZCOPY.ASM in assembly language and instructions for
               obtaining ZCOPY by modem. Includes six tables and a program
               listing.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; DOS; Program Listing; Tutorial; Data
               Transmission
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI05-179
       Author: Prosise, Jeff
        Title: Printer control: the easy way -- This easier, more flexible
               upgrade of our popular SETUP utility lets you tell your
               printer exactly how to print a file--and you never...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 30, 1989) v8 n10 p345-370
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: SETUP2.COM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents a tutorial for printing a Lotus
               1-2-3 spreadsheet sideways on a laser printer using the
               SETUP2.COM utility program written in assembly language.
               Explains how to use the SETUP2 program, how to customize
               menus, how to modify the code, and gives some programming
               notes. Includes a sidebar that explains how to customize
               SETUP2.COM for Epson dot matrix and HP LaserJet printers.
               Contains two diagrams and a program listing.
Descriptor(s): Printer Controller; Utility Program; Spreadsheet; Printer;
               Laser Printer; Programming Instruction
Compatibility: Lotus 1-2-3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI05-050
       Author: Flanders, Bob Holmes, Michael
        Title: Slice oversize files down to floppy size -- When your file
               is bigger than your floppy, SLICE and SPLICE let you split
               that file across a number of disks and then reassemble it
               ...
       Source: PC Magazine (May 16, 1989) v8 n9 p279-290
    Pub. Type: Program Listing
 Product Name: SLICE.COM
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents assembly language and BASIC
               program listings for a program called SLICE.COM, that can
               split files that require more than one floppy and copy onto
               multiple disks. Explains how to download the program, how it
               works, and how the commands functions. Includes Sidebar
               article "Slice By Modem" (p. 287), which explains how to
               download the program from PC MagNet.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Disk Files
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI02-070
       Author: Mefford, Michael J
        Title: Smooth scrolling means easy reading -- Text browsers usually
               scroll in whole-line increments, blurring the words you're
               trying to read. SMOOTH.COM lets you navigate through..
       Source: PC Magazine (February 14, 1989) v8 n3 p289-301
    Pub. Type: Column
     Abstract: UTILITIES column presents assembly language and BASIC
               listings for SMOOTH.COM, a utility which allows smooth
               scrolling of a file through scrolling based on scan lines
               rather than text lines. Direction of scrolling is controlled
               through arrow keys, speed of scrolling through the plus and
               minus keys or through the number keys. Presents a detailed
               description of how the program works. A sidebar describes
               how to obtain a copy of SMOOTH.COM from PC MagNet. Includes
               one figure.
Descriptor(s): Utility Program; Tutorial; Program Listing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Record No.: 89PI02-017
       Author: Seymour, Jim
        Title: Mousing around with Lotus -- A devoted fan of alternate
               input devices has long despaired of getting a mouse to work
               well with 1-2-3. Now he's found a ...
       Source: PC Magazine (February 14, 1989) v8 n3 p77-78
    Pub. Type: Column
 Company Name: Marq Technologies
 Product Name: MarqNavigator; Felix
     Abstract: JIM SEYMOUR column discusses the use of mice as an alternate
               input device, specifically for Lotus 1-2-3. Says he tried
               Felix, which replaces the 1-2-3 interface with one of its
               own, and found it lacking because of the different feel of
               the program. Gives a very favorable review, however, to
               MarqNavigator ($149), a mouse control utility from Marq
               Technologies (800). It supports Logitech and Microsoft mice
               and using it retains the feel of 1-2-3 while making it
               faster and easier to use. Says that testing by coworkers
               resulted in unanimous enthusiasm for the product.
Descriptor(s): Mouse; Utility Program
        Grade: A
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

   II.  The 72 articles from Infotrac from 1985 to 1989


        Envelopes on lasers are easy. (includes related article on customizing
        envelopes) (Utilities) (column)  Ron Saidikowsky.
        PC Magazine, Dec 27, 1988 v7 n22 p233(14).  Mag. Coll.: 47H1094. Bus.
        Coll.: .41Z4644.  Elec. Coll.: A7168195.
        Abstract:  A memory-resident utility program is listed that allows the
        printing of envelopes within a word processing application to a laser
        printer. The program captures name and address listing from the screen
        and prints it with an optional return address. Details of the program
        are listed, along with a related sidebar on customizing the program.
        The program may either be entered on keyboard or received through PC
        magazine by modem.
 

        Keyworks. (envelope-printing macro)  Edward Mendelson.
        PC Magazine, Dec 13, 1988 v7 n21 p256(3).  Mag. Coll.: 47E1975. Bus.
        Coll.: .41X3411.  Elec. Coll.: A7121313.
        Abstract:  The $99 Keyworks is a simple keyboard macro program that
        offers more functions than any other such program. An
        envelope-printing macro is given that lets the user run the macro with
        a letter onscreen. The user simply marks the address, copies it, then
        prints it on an envelope. The advanced version of the Keyworks program
        lets the user write a macro that automatically finds the address. The
        program offers flexible and effective printer support.
 

        Lotus Metro. (envelope-printing macro)  Edward Mendelson.
        PC Magazine, Dec 13, 1988 v7 n21 p264(2).  Mag. Coll.: 47E1983. Bus.
        Coll.: .41X3419.  Elec. Coll.: A7121379.
        Abstract:  Although the $85 Lotus Metro keyboard macro program takes a
        lot of RAM (125Kbytes), it offers a great deal of functionality and
        flexibility in return. An envelope-printing macro is given for the
        LaserJet printer which lets users block out an address in a letter,
        copy it into the Metro Clipboard, print the address with the user's
        return address, then restore the printer to its default mode. The
        program comes with an Editor accessory that provides users with even
        more power and maneuverability. The program is not as effective at
        handling a printer as another program, Alpha Software Corp's Keyworks
        3.0.
 

        Log your PC's activity. (program log utility)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Dec 13, 1988 v7 n21 p317(10).  Mag. Coll.: 47E2032. Bus.
        Coll.: .41X3468.  Elec. Coll.: A7122285.
        Abstract:  Users can automatically track the dates, times, and names
        of the programs that are being run with a type-in utility. The utility
        produces a log that can be used to keep track on online time or to
        document specific program use for office managers or tax purposes. The
        user simply places the program, LOG.COM, into the AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
        The program is a compact, memory-resident utility that produces ASCII
        log files. Users can either type in the source code that is provided
        here, or download a ready-to-run copy directly from PC MagNet.
        Although the program does possess some programming complexities, LOG
        is a convenient and unobtrusive utility. The program is best-suited
        for hard disk systems. User type-in listings are given in BASIC and
        assembly language.
 

        Communications and video setup with SETMODE. (utility program)
        (includes related articles on obtaining SETMODE via modem and on the
        RS-232 language) (Productivity)  Tom Kihlken.
        PC Magazine, July 1988 v7 n13 p351(13).  Mag. Coll.: 45E2040.  Bus.
        Coll.: .38Z4850.  Elec. Coll.: A6756053.
        Abstract:  Configuring the video mode and communications ports of a PC
        using the MODE command can be complex and tedious. A memory-resident
        utility program called SETMODE is given. The program gives users
        complete control over communications ports and video modes, offers all
        the common functions of MODE, and even gives users access to data and
        functions that DOS ignores. A program listing is provided and users
        can obtain the utility via modem using PC MagNet. The function and
        usage of SETMODE are explained in detail.
 

        Splitting up the keyboard combos. (Utilities) (column)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, April 26, 1988 v7 n8 p233(12).  Elec. Coll.: A6296510.
        Abstract:  STAYDOWN is an user type-in keyboard utility program in
        BASIC and assembly language that lets the user enter any two key
        combinations among Ctrl-, Alt-, and Shift-keys as separate keystrokes.
        The utility is handy because of IBM's awkward placement of the
        function keys, requiring agile typing skills to simultaneously press
        two of the keys at once. With STAYDOWN, any of the three keys is
        temporarily locked down - the break code is ignored - when pressed
        until the break code from a second one of the keys is introduced. The
        memory-resident program is entered the first time with a direct DOS
        command and can be either deactivated or uninstalled with switch
        commands at the DOS prompt. The program is particularly useful with
        Enhanced keyboards with function keys that are at the top of the top
        instead of the side.
 

        Reach out and touch your files. (Touch, utility program)
        (Productivity)  Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, April 12, 1988 v7 n7 p309(11).  Mag. Coll.: 43M1432.
        Bus. Coll.: .36Z4700.  Elec. Coll.: A6274028.
        Abstract:  TOUCH is a user type-in program in BASIC and assembly
        language which lets users change DOS file date and time designations
        on disk directories. The program is prompted directly from a DOS
        prompt. A help screen showing proper entry of arguments is given.
        Either or both time and date attributes can be commanded at once. A
        related article on the relationship between TOUCH and the MAKE utility
        on Microsoft MASM and QuickC language compilers is offered.
 

        LAP-LINK Mac connects PCs and Apple Macintoshes at 57,600 bps. (New on
        the Market)  Michael W. Muchmore.
        PC Magazine, March 29, 1988 v7 n6 p51(1).  Mag. Coll.: 43J1746. Bus.
        Coll.: .36Y2466.  Elec. Coll.: A6259688.
 

        A programmer's pop-up calculator. (Utilities)  Douglas Boling.
        PC Magazine, March 29, 1988 v7 n6 p257(15).  Mag. Coll.: 43J1946.
        Bus. Coll.: .36Y2656.  Elec. Coll.: A6258564.
        Abstract:  CALC is a user type-in program in assembly language and
        BASIC which operates as a memory-resident calculation utility program.
        Activated with a hot key combination of ALT-S (user changeable), Calc
        acts as a programmer's pop-up calculator with base conversion, bit
        shifting, logical operators, mod functions and 32-bit number
        representation that also supports two-decimal fixed-place arithmetic
        calculations. Instructions on changing the default hot key and colors
        are provided with tables of possible values.
 

        WYSIfonts! displays soft fonts in Ventura Publisher and Windows.
        (product announcement)  Michael W. Muchmore.
        PC Magazine, Feb 29, 1988 v7 n4 p52(1).  Mag. Coll.: 43E1151.  Bus.
        Coll.: .36T2935.  Elec. Coll.: A6218920.
 

        In brief. (WonUnder expansion unit and Extra! program) (PC Update)
        (product announcement)  Peggy Gavan.
        PC Magazine, Feb 29, 1988 v7 n4 p54(1).  Mag. Coll.: 43E1153.  Bus.
        Coll.: .36T2937.  Elec. Coll.: A6219348.
 

        TOPS-DOS Version 2.0. (PC Update) (product announcement)  Peggy Gavan.
        PC Magazine, Feb 16, 1988 v7 n3 p54(1).  Mag. Coll.: 43A0483.  Bus.
        Coll.: .35Y1339.  Elec. Coll.: A6178202.
 

        Datacopy scanner and utility format tabular text into spreadsheets.
        (Model 830 Image Scanner and OCR 4mat) (New on the Market) (product
        announcement)
        PC Magazine, Jan 26, 1988 v7 n2 p53(1).  Mag. Coll.: 42L0532.  Bus.
        Coll.: .35W1521.  Elec. Coll.: A6162238.
 

        A memory manager for TSRs shuttles pop-ups into and out of memory.
        (Delta Technology's Extra software package) (New on the Market)
        (product announcement)  Jonathan Matzkin.
        PC Magazine, Jan 12, 1988 v7 n1 p53(1).  Mag. Coll.: 42J0840.  Bus.
        Coll.: .36N1514.  Elec. Coll.: A6186978.
 

        Custom-design your own help screens. (in PC Lab Notes) (column)
        Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, Jan 12, 1988 v7 n1 p311(10).  Mag. Coll.: 42J1098. Bus.
        Coll.: .36N1772.  Elec. Coll.: A6162292.
        Abstract:  HELP is a user type-in utility program in BASIC and
        assembly language. The program lets users create memory resident pop
        up help screens or reference tables for use in applications or at DOS
        prompts. HELP must be used in conjunction with CAPTURE.COM, another
        type-in program listed in the Utilities section of the same issue.
        Together the programs let users write screen pages of information
        pertinent to applications and DOS functions. By pressing a hot key,
        ALT-H, the screens pop up where needed.
 

        Capture your own help screens. (in Utilities) (column)  Tom Kihlken.
        PC Magazine, Jan 12, 1988 v7 n1 p325(10).  Mag. Coll.: 42J1110. Bus.
        Coll.: .36N1784.  Elec. Coll.: A6162332.
        Abstract:  CAPTURE is a user type-in utility program that is used in
        conjunction with HELP, another type in program listed in the same
        issue. The memory resident screen saving program saves text and
        attribute bytes on the screen to a 4,000 byte file which can then be
        popped up either in an application or at the DOS prompt.
 

        KBX is even better. (utility program KBX.COM) (letter to the editor)
        E. Michael Perdue.
        PC Magazine, Dec 8, 1987 v6 n21 p21(1).  Elec. Coll.: A6141300.
        Abstract:  KBX.COM allow entering extended-ASCII line-drawing,
        foreign language, math, and science symbols from within
        a word processing program and editors that would not otherwise
        support them.

        [Author's Note: See also the wonderful CTRLALT.COM program
        by Barry Simon and Richard Wilson, V. 1.00, April, 1986
        which pops up a 256 character ASCII table including all
        high bit characters (available addressed by hex or decimal)
        that can be selected and pasted into the current document.
        The program also supports multiple-line text cut and
        paste operations on a text mode (non graphic) screen.]

        The compleat copy utility. (CO.COM, user type-in DOS utility program)
        .Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, Dec 8, 1987 v6 n21 p397(18).  Elec. Coll.: A6096120.
        Abstract:  CO.COM is a type-in program in assembly language and BASIC,
        which lets users COPY, MOVE, or DEL groups of files; makes efficient
        use of floppies; and lets users change floppies when needed when
        backing up files. The program retains original COPY command functions
        as well. Directories are shown in pages scrolled up and down with
        cursor arrow keys. Files can be pinpointed by pressing the first
        letter in their names. CO.COM also works by with mnemonic control-key
        combinations, such as CTRL-C for copy and CTRL-D for delete.
 

        A colorfast screen and stable cursor.  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Nov 24, 1987 v6 n20 p349(9).  Mag. Coll.: 42A0522. Bus.
        Coll.: .34X1627.  Elec. Coll.: A6124115.
 

        Getting control of your cursor. (Utilities; the first of a two-part
        series on the CTYPE utility program) (column)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Nov 10, 1987 v6 n19 p463(10).  Elec. Coll.: A6015728.
        Abstract:  In the first of a two-part series, the CTYPE utility that
        customizes the shape of the screen cursor until another program
        changes it is described and listed in BASIC and assembly language. The
        program is compatible with monochrome, EGA, or CGA video display
        adapters as well as the new VGA cards. CTYPE cursors can be shaped
        either interactively on a special viewing screen or directly from the
        DOS prompt by typing in CTYPE and a two-letter code corresponding to
        the shape desired. How to use the program, the Motorola 6845 CRT
        Controller on which the CGA and monochrome display adapters are
        designed, two flaws in EGA emulation logic, and how the video adapter
        is identified are described.
 

        What print screen should have been. (column)  Tom Kihlken.
        PC Magazine, Oct 27, 1987 v6 n18 p359(13).  Elec. Coll.: A6015876.
        Abstract:  Any portion of a screen can be captured by the SNIPPER
        utility and sent to a printer or a diskfile or added to an
        applications program that will take keyboard input. The pop-up utility
        program will enable the programmer to mark any segment of a screen in
        order to copy that area to the printer, to disk, or into keyboard
        buffer. The memory-resident program can be downloaded via modem.
        Snipper is compatible with most memory-resident programs.
 

        Address listed. (LIST utility program review) (letter to the editor)
        Harvey Tannenbaum.
        PC Magazine, Oct 13, 1987 v6 n17 p21(1).  Elec. Coll.: A6126136.
 

        A directory-wide file manager. (RN.COM utility program to manage
        subdirectories and files)  Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, Sept 29, 1987 v6 n16 p351(17).  Elec. Coll.: A5245544.
        Abstract:  The analysis includes program listings for RN.COM, a
        utility program that allows users to move quickly among branches of a
        directory tree and manage subdirectories and files. RN allows users to
        rename, create, and delete directories and contents, as well as to
        change the attributes of all the files in the directory at once. The
        program complements the DR file utility presented in the Volume 6,
        Number 14, issue of PC Magazine. RN can only be accessed from the
        MS-DOS prompt and should be loaded before SideKick and other memory
        resident programs. The program can be uninstalled without rebooting
        and requires 128Kbytes of RAM on an IBM PC or compatible. The program
        displays an alphabetized directory tree, with the current directory
        highlighted on the left side of the screen and menu options to the
        right. A tutorial on how a disk is laid out is included.
 

        Expanding DOS at the touch of a finger. (a terminate-and-stay-resident
        program to improve DOS productivity) (in PC Lab Notes: Enhancing DOS)
        (column)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Sept 15, 1987 v6 n15 p357(12).  Elec. Coll.: A5141642.
        Abstract:  A terminate-and-stay-resident utility program, called
        DOSKEY.COM, is described and source coding for the utility is provided
        in both assembly language and BASIC. DOSKEY enhances DOS commands by
        providing macro commands (stacked DOS commands) for eight function
        keys, by buffering the last 15 DOS commands to allow arrow-scrolling
        through them, by enabling command line editing, by adding color to
        teletype interfaces on DOS, and by ensuring that CLS clears the
        viewing area. TSR DOSKEY requires only 4Kbytes of RAM.
 

        Adding notes to directories. (annotating directories with
        DIRNOTES.COM) (in Programming-Utilities) (column)  Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, Sept 15, 1987 v6 n15 p385(10).  Elec. Coll.: A5141644.
        Abstract:  The source code for a utility program that allows users to
        annotate their file directories is listed in assembly language, and a
        BASIC program listing is provided that will automatically generate the
        utility, called DIRNOTES.COM. DIRNOTES lists files in directories
        alphabetically, with file sizes and dates of most recent updates
        provided, while allowing annotation of each file on the right half of
        the screen.
 

        Expanding DOS at the touch of a finger. (keyboard utility program)
        Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Sept 15, 1987 v6 p357(12).  Mag. Coll.: 40L1150.  Bus.
        Coll.: .33S2217.  Elec. Coll.: A5177056.
 

        Popping out your pop-ups. (three programs for terminate-and-stay
        resident softwares) (in PC Lab Notes) (technical)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Aug 1987 v6 n14 p419(11).  Elec. Coll.: A5081622.
        Abstract:  Pop-up utilities or TSR (terminate-and-stay resident)
        programs cannot normally be cleared from memory without rebooting the
        entire system. Moreover, instructing the operating system as to where
        the cleared memory space is, once the TSR utility has been removed, is
        problematic at best. Three programs are described, including their
        source codes in assembly and Basic languages, that can help shuffle
        TSR (or pop-up) softwares in and out of memory. The programs listed
        and explained are: INSTALL, REMOVE, and PCMAP. THe last program is a
        relatively short utility program that displays memory mappings of
        names, addresses, and sizes of TSR utilities.
 

        Beyond number crunching. (products that add database management and
        word processing capabilities to Lotus 1-2-3)  Tom Badgett.
        PC Magazine, July 21, 1987 v6 n13 p289(16).  Elec. Coll.: A5158813.
        Abstract:  The Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet package has row-column
        arrangements suited for creating a simple database and simple database
        management activities. Add-in software packages that are recommended
        to aid in database manipulation include Lotus Development Corp's $150
        1-2-3 Report Writer and Fox & Geller's $149 QuickCode for 1-2-3.
        Report Writer is recommended for Lotus 1-2-3 users for added
        flexibility, and Quickcode is recommended as a better user interface
        than Lotus Development Corp's HAL. Four word processing products
        examined include: Turner Hall Publishing's $99.95 4-Word $79.95 and
        Note-It; Funk Software Inc's $99 InWord; and Personic Corp's $79.95
        SmartNotes.
 

        Mouse software: see how they run. (mouse add-on utilities)  Jeff
        Prosise.
        PC Magazine, July 21, 1987 v6 n13 p411(10).  Elec. Coll.: A5158842.
        Abstract:  Mice users can enhance their devices' capabilities with
        mouse add-on utilities. Microsoft Mouse and its corresponding device
        driver is recommended for the following reasons: Microsoft Corp
        produces both mouse software and hardware and a variety of
        applications; the Mouse driver has a range of 24 functions, and the
        product is constantly under internal review for adaptation to the
        latest industry requirements. A listing and explanation of Microsoft
        Mouse Drive Function Calls is included; a utility program to add mouse
        utilities to an application is also included.
 

        Your pop-up stenographer. (PC utility program)  Steve Holzner.
        PC Magazine, July 21, 1987 v6 p433(7).  Mag. Coll.: 40A0422.  Bus.
        Coll.: .32P3309.  Elec. Coll.: A5012296.
 

        TurboPower Software: T-DebugPLUS. (Turbo Pascal utility program)
        Stephen Randy Davis.
        PC Magazine, June 23, 1987 v6 n12 p238(2).  Elec. Coll.: A5158756.
        Abstract:  T-DebugPLUS from TurboPower Software is a debugging utility
        program retailing for $60 and requiring 256Kbytes of RAM on a
        microcomputer operating DOS 2.0 or later with two disk drives.
        T-DebugPLUS supports Turbo Pascal 3.00b, 3.01a, BCD, or 8087. The
        third-party debugging software is praised for its flexibility,
        command-driven interface facility, usefulness, variety of functions,
        user-friendliness (which eliminates the need for a manual, although
        one is provided), easy assembler debugging routines, and easy symbolic
        debugging routines. T-DebugPLUS is described as 'difficult to
        praise...too highly.'
 

        Clean out clones the easy way. (unneeded duplicate files) (column)
        Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, June 9, 1987 v6 n11 p377(8).  Elec. Coll.: A5090862.
        Abstract:  The REPEATS utility program is a useful tool for the hard
        disk user. The utility program has the ability to identify duplicate
        files that are unnecessary and all of the same-named versions that
        inundate hard disk directories. The utility program's assembly code is
        examined. A BASIC program is included that creates the REPEATS.COM
        program.
 

        Drawing made easy. (The BASIC DRAW utility complementing the PLAY
        utility presented earlier) (column)  Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, May 12, 1987 v6 n9 p343(15).  Elec. Coll.: A4832671.
        Abstract:  The DRAW utility program can be used with the PLAY utility
        presented in an earlier column for creating artwork. The two utility
        programs have similar BASIC command structures and are designed for
        the BASIC programming environment. The utilities require an EGA or CGA
        card; complete instructions on how to use the utilities are presented.
        Also presented are BSAVE and BLOAD, two utilities for creating
        pictures that are generated full-blown on-screen rather than having
        DRAW paint the screen.
 

        A DOS music generator. (utility program)  Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, April 28, 1987 v6 n8 p297(9).  Elec. Coll.: A4975203.
        Abstract:  PLAY.COM is a DOS utility that emulates the BASIC command
        set of the same name, but allows more versatile music composition than
        the BASIC version. Several options are available from the program
        after the PLAY.DAT file in the current directory has been created by
        the user. Among them are automatic operation, giving PLAY arguments
        directly from the command line as a string, and giving PLAY a data
        file with the commands. Data files for the Scott Joplin rag 'The
        Entertainer', the 'Dragnet' theme, and 'Greensleeves' are provided as
        examples. The design and operation of PLAY.COM and how it can be used
        to create music in the chromatic scale are described.
 

        Expanding the DOS environment. (column)  Richard Hale Shaw.
        PC Magazine, April 14, 1987 v6 n7 p295(10).
        Abstract:  The DOS environment can be expanded despite limits on
        program interaction. When a secondary command processor is used to run
        a batch file, allowing batch file nesting, alterations can be made
        only for a copy of the environment, and they become lost once the
        batch program is over. Memory-resident and non-memory-resident
        programs are different from batch files in that they receive only a
        copy of the environment, either from the program that they were loaded
        from or from DOS. With the DOS SETENV utility program from Microsoft
        the user can patch COMMAND.COM to reserve an environment between 160
        and 992 bytes.


        Instant access to directories. (column)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, April 14, 1987 v6 n7 p313(15).  Elec. Coll.: A4756923.
        Abstract:  XDIR.COM is a memory-resident utility program that uses DOS
        interrupt 27th to connect itself to the operating system. The program
        gives the user access to virtually a window at almost any time in
        order to examine the contents of any disk directories or
        subdirectories, even from within the applications program. The
        memory-resident utility will defend against violating DOS
        non-reentrancy characteristics; however, the utility that assumes disk
        access must be careful not to intercede with the program that is being
        interrupted. XDIR will produce custom interrupt 28th calls, allowing
        SideKick or any other program to pop up at any time. The internal
        routines of DOS are functional coding tools for DOS programmers.
 

        Preventing copy disasters. (column)  Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, March 31, 1987 v6 n6 p295(10).  Elec. Coll.: A4739058.
        Abstract:  The utility program COPYSAFE will warn users when they are
        about to write over an existing file with the same name, a capability
        now missing from DOS. The memory-resident program is used to monitor
        the DOS prompt looking ahead to warn when an existing file is about to
        be overwritten. COPYSAFE allows the user to move ahead or backward in
        order to prevent an irretrievable miscue. The fastest way to receive
        the program is to download it from the PC Magazine Interactive Reader
        Service with a modem. Once COPYSAFE saves the old interrupt 21h
        vector, the utility program will substitute its own vector.
        Consequently, if an INT 21h is issued, the program is called first.
        When COPY has been entered by the user, COPYSAFE issues the necessary
        warning if it has determined the target file exists.
 

        Instant ASCII at your service. (column)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, March 10, 1987 v6 n5 p349(11).  Elec. Coll.: A4749542.
        Abstract:  The ASC.COM memory-resident utility program described and
        listed in assembly and BASIC can be used to generate a window listing
        the complete ASCII character set, including the hexadecimal and
        decimal equivalents of each character. The source code listing gives
        various working approaches to the techniques and concepts that form
        the foundation for programming desktop software. The extended ASCII
        chart is split into segments of 32 characters by ASC, with several
        range control techniques available to the user. ASC will not work with
        programs that take over the keyboard interrupt, but will work with
        most other programs. It provides a fast and easy way to exit a running
        application, find the codes needed, and return to the application
        without losing data. The program should be particularly appealing to
        programmers who would rather not use 40Kbytes of RAM for a more
        popular but less well-behavedutility on the market that serves the
        same function.
 

        A very savvy search utility. (column)  Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, Feb 24, 1987 v6 n4 p287(9).  Elec. Coll.: A4689673.
        Abstract:  The SEARCH.COM DOS utility program quickly merges string
        search and file search functions into one program, with case
        sensitivity and printer echo options. With SEARCH.COM, a higher number
        of parameters will result in a narrower search. The addition of the
        (slash)C case switch will make the string searches case sensitive. A
        large part of the power of assembler programming stems from the use of
        different subroutines that exist in the BIOS in ROM and the more
        advanced DOS subroutines in RAM; how SEARCH uses these subroutines in
        perusing documents is described. Also discussed are narrowing the
        search, searching across the disk, and tree-structured searches.
 

        A very savvy search utility. (computer utility program, SEARCH.COM)
        Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, Feb 24, 1987 v6 p287(9).  Mag. Coll.: 38A0786.  Bus.
        Coll.: .29U2330.  Elec. Coll.: A4646600.
 
        Playing the dating game. (keyboard macros used to insert dates and
        time-stamps into documents)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Feb 10, 1987 v6 n3 p323(9).  Elec. Coll.: A4644300.
        Abstract:  The TIMEKEY utility program is a memory-resident command
        that can be used by programmers to enable the keyboard to invoke
        dynamic string assignments. The present time or date can be included
        with documents at the cursor's location. TIMEKEY is designed to
        borrow, but not steal, the timer interrupt from coresident programs.
        TIMEKEY is compatible with a large variety of software, though it may
        not agree with programs that intercept the keyboard interrupt and some
        resident utility programs.
 

        A command you can count on. (PARSE.COM) (column)  Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, Jan 27, 1987 v6 n2 p273(7).  Elec. Coll.: A4655427.
        Abstract:  PARSE.COM is a utility program that will allow the program
        developer to see quickly how many words, characters, and sentences are
        included in a document, and it will rate the readability of the
        document, according to the close approximation of the .FOG index. Each
        file character is evaluated by PARSE.COM under grammatical
        regulations. An example: a period must come before a space in order to
        differentiate it from an embedded decimal point; by setting
        SENTENCE-FLAG high, PARSE can do this. It is taken for granted by
        PARSE that any word with more than seven letters will at least be
        trisyllabic. PARSE.COM is listed in both assembly language and BASIC.
 

        Retrofitting a DOS system. (column)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Dec 9, 1986 v5 n21 p303(11).  Elec. Coll.: A4617883.
        Abstract:  The DISKPREP.COM utility program can be used to reformat
        the clusters of data, the directory of the non-system floppy disk, and
        its file allocation table in order to ensure that the SYS command will
        effectively add the system even when some of the disk files take up
        space that is required by the system files. DISKPREP will allow the
        programmer to eliminate system files and replace them with up-to-date
        files. There are three steps to transforming a non-system disk: the
        initial step begins with using DISKPREP to prepare the disk; the next
        step is using the SYS.COM program accompanying DOS to install the
        system on the disk; and the last step is copying the file COMMAND.COM
        from the DOS disk to the target disk. Ideal candidates for the batch
        file include the three procedures used in the SYStemization technique.
        When the prepping process is not successful, DISKPREP will halt the
        process and flash a status message identifying the source of the
        problem.
 

        Taking up residence. (Special report: RAM residency)  Robin Raskin,
        Charles Petzold and Stephen Randy Davis.
        PC Magazine, Nov 25, 1986 v5 n20 p163(7).  Elec. Coll.: A4586581.
        Abstract:  The use of RAM-resident software packages that allow users
        to perform multitasking operations using DOS has its problems. The
        terminate-but-stay-resident (TSR) function call, with the printing
        utilities contained in DOS 1.1, do not operate interactively. Pop-up
        utilities in the form of desktop accessories or keyboard enhancers
        require a large part of the system's resources including keyboard
        control, large amounts of memory, timing and scheduling control, and
        the best positions in the memory stack. A program will hand over
        control to DOS, remaining in memory itself, when the TSR command is
        used with a computer that has only limited memory. Though the SideKick
        utility program from Borland International is the most popular utility
        program now on the market, utility programs based on fast and
        attractive pop-ups are available from many vendors. Eventually,
        RAM-resident software will be replaced by operating environments,
        partitioning, and multitasking.
 

        The power of suggestion. (SUGGEST.COM, a program that flashes
        subliminal messages on a monitor screen) (column)  Michael J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, Nov 25, 1986 v5 n20 p317(5).  Elec. Coll.: A4586613.
        Abstract:  The resident program SUGGEST.COM can be used to flash
        subliminal programming communiques in the background, while work is
        being done. A message will flash almost instantaneously, but it is not
        completely invisible; you will usually see the message, or you will at
        least see the flash. The monitor design, not the design of the utility
        program, determines a messages "on" time. Researchers have used the
        tachistoscope to measure a truly subliminal message, showing that the
        duration of such a message should be about 1-1000 of a second. SUGGEST
        does not display subliminal messages, but does display abbreviated
        supraliminal messages.
 

        Beat the beeps with VISITYPE. (a utility program for data entry)
        Steve Holzner.
        PC Magazine, Oct 28, 1986 v5 n18 p313(7).  Elec. Coll.: A4470962.
        Abstract:  The 80-character VISITYPE buffer, which is visible, can be
        used to make corrections when the amount of keystrokes runs ahead of
        the disk operating system's (DOS) 15-character typehead limit. The
        user will use this kind of utility many times or not all. The utility
        program VISITYPE is memory resident and furnishes a huge 80-character
        buffer for users who need to type faster than the personal computer's
        (PCs) 15-character typehead buffer will allow. The visible typehead
        displayed on the screen does not upset the program or cause the
        program to crash because of its writing to the video buffer.
 

        Weed out excess files with XDEL. (computer program utility)  Ronald
        Czapala.
        PC Magazine, Sept 30, 1986 v5 p267(8).  Mag. Coll.: 35H1460.  Bus.
        Coll.: .26R1390.  Elec. Coll.: A4376505.
 

        Display screen issues. (column)  Peter Norton.
        PC Magazine, July 1986 v5 n13 p73(3).  Elec. Coll.: A4290908.
        Abstract:  A discussion of the page-down key (PgDn) design that
        appeared recently in the Letters to PC Magazine column debated whether
        it was better to refer to the key as the down-page key (DnPG), and
        while that issue in itself is of no real significance, it does suggest
        an underlying design principle in personal computers. The relationship
        between the display screen and the data it displays can be seen in two
        ways: either the screen is static and the data moves under it, or the
        data is static and the screen moves above it. A particular user's
        preference for PgDn of DnPg will depend in large part on how the
        screen-data relationship is perceived, and points out the psychology
        of software engineering, and to a degree how humans like to imagine an
        objective view of the world would appear. Following this ethereal
        discourse, a memory-resident utility program called FlickerFree is
        described, which helps alleviate problems associated with snow,
        flicker and lack of speed in screen displays.
 

        Status symbols for your PC.  John Socha.
        PC Magazine, July 1986 v5 n13 p305(7).
        Abstract:  A common complaint about the old-style IBM PC keyboard is
        that its NumLock, CapsLock and ScrollLock toggle keys do not feature
        any way to know their status, whether they are active or not. The
        problem was corrected by IBM with the PC AT keyboard, but users of PCs
        are still left without a way of monitoring the status of those keys.
        STATLINE is a utility program written by the author that provides
        users with a way to find the status of the three keys by providing a
        line on the bottom of the display that shows three 'lights', one for
        each, that report the status of the keys. The program is written in
        assembly language and can be downloaded from the Interactive Reader
        Service for users with modems, otherwise it must be keyed in manually.
        (Complete directions for assembling and loading the program are
        included.) The operation of the program, how it compares with SideKick
        from Borland International, tips on how to avoid potential problems,
        and an inside look at the mechanisms involved in the program's
        operation are included.


        Programming-utilities: Make exceptions with NO.COM.  Charles Petzold.
        PC Magazine, May 13, 1986 v5 n9 p275(8).  Elec. Coll.: A4240863.
        Abstract:  The NO.COM utility program listed is intended to allow
        users to specify what should not be done, such as delete all files
        except one, or copy an entire subdirectory except certain files, or
        list everything except .BAS files. The program's syntax, limitations,
        capabilities, and operation are described, and how to copy the program
        or download it directly from the magazine's Interactive Reader Service
        is explained. The primary exception to the use of the program is that
        it will not work with the PCDOS BACKUP program, but there are a number
        of other less serious precautions outlined as well. A future column
        will list a more complete program for controlling file attributes.
 

        Search and identify. (computer program utility)  Peter Norton.
        PC Magazine, May 13, 1986 v5 p81(3).  Mag. Coll.: 33J4644.  Bus.
        Coll.: .23Z1278.  Elec. Coll.: A4240895.
 

        Make exceptions with NO.COM. (file program utility for the PC)
        Charles Petzold.
        PC Magazine, May 13, 1986 v5 p275(8).  Mag. Coll.: 33J4826.  Bus.
        Coll.: .23Z1472.  Elec. Coll.: A4240907.
 

        CAD Support: An Embarrassment of Riches: AutoSHAPES.  Glenn Hart.
        PC Magazine, March 11, 1986 v5 n5 p176-178.
        Abstract:  AutoSHAPES from Systems Unlimited of California provides
        almost all AutoCAD users with the ability to use that package's Shapes
        system to increase speed and disk storage and to simplify custom font
        generation and drawing. The $150 utility displays a matrix of boxes
        sixteen by sixteen, one box for each ASCII character set code, with
        shapes drawn within the boxes using a grid that is 100 by 100. A
        variety of symbols and other preset entities are included in the
        program, and definition of text fonts, a complex and time-consuming
        task with AutoCAD alone, is made easier. AutoSHAPES is recommended as
        a fast and easy shape utility program for users requiring a large
        number of symbols.


        Fix Up Commands with DOS-EDIT.  Charles Petzold.
        PC Magazine, Feb. 11, 1986 v5 n3 p217-219.  Elec. Coll.: A657124.
        Abstract:  A utility program, DOS-EDIT, is listed to allow the Cursor
        up key to fix text and reenter in the disk operating system (DOS). The
        program resides in memory and works on the DOS command level as well
        as with DOS programs like EDLIN and DEBUG. It is first necessary to
        learn a little about the DOS editing keys, which themselves can only
        recall the command immediately preceding, but DOS-EDIT can be used to
        retrieve other commands on the screen as well. It may conflict with
        other RAM-resident programs, however, and may require rebooting if it
        does not run initially. Complete instructions on installing and
        running the DOS-EDIT program are included, along with the complete
        program listing.
 

        Custom-Made Boot Messages.  Peter Norton.
        PC Magazine, Jan. 28, 1986 v5 n2 p271-272.  Elec. Coll.: A655949.
        Abstract:  A utility program is listed for users who try to start up a
        computer with an ordinary disk instead of a boot disk. The program is
        useful to program vendors who wish to reassure users who may be
        intimidated by the harsh warning generated by such a mistake, and for
        user groups which distribute thousands of diskettes in the public
        domain. The program displays a series of messages to give users
        information of the programmer's choice before waiting for a keystroke
        and rebooting the computer. Step-by-step instructions for running the
        program are included.
 

        Sizing Up Your Files.  Art Merrill.
        PC Magazine, Jan. 14, 1986 v5 n1 p221-225.  Elec. Coll.: A656154.
        Abstract:  SIZE, COM is a utility program that determines the total
        amount of bytes necessary to copy from 1 to 255 files, assembled by
        file name or by type. The utility runs on any drive, directory, or
        subdirectory, and based from any subdirectory. A program called FREE.
        COM is included that is faster than waiting for DIR or CHKDSK at
        indicating the number of bytes allocated and the number still
        available. Versions of SIZE and FREE can be downloaded from PC
        Magazine's Interactive Reader Service by modem, or by typing the
        program listing in the magazine.
 

        KEY-FAKEing Keystrokes.  Charles. Petzold.
        PC Magazine, Dec. 24, 1985 v4 n26 p215-220.  Elec. Coll.: A659574.
        Abstract:  KEY-FAKE is an utility program that provides the required
        keystrokes automatically to programs and increases the application of
        batch files. Program commands can be inserted in a batch file as a
        number of keystrokes using KEY-FAKE, which are interpreted as user
        initiated keystrokes when the batch file is loaded. KEY-FAKE differs
        from the DOS 2.0 facility called redirection by using the BIO
        Interrupt for inputing keystrokes and the control of the program is
        returned to the user once KEY-FAKE's keystrokes are through. KEY-FAKE
        can be obtained by either typing the KEY-FAKE.BAS program listing to
        create KEY-FAKE.COM, or download KEY-FAKE from PC Magazine's
        Interactive Reader Service. The limitations to KEY-FAKE are: the
        command parameters are limited to 127 characters, a KEY-FAKE command
        must be completely executed before initiating a new KEY-FAKE command
        or the second will write over the first command, and KEY-FAKE only
        supports keys supported by PC BIOS.

        [Note:  The original KEY-FAKE could not be loaded high.  For
        a later copy that can be, please contact the author of this
        document]
 

        Unearthed Treasures.  P. Norton.
        PC Magazine, Oct. 1, 1985 v4 n20 p81.  Elec. Coll.: A645663.
        Abstract:  Microsoft Word runs slowly on some word processors, so
        Norton suggests a turbo board that can increase a PC's power. A
        Hercules graphic card and a mouse are also recommended. SetHP, an
        utility program for the H-P Laser jet lets users issues commands to
        the printer from an unsophisticated program. Software Digest reviews
        one type of program per month with ratings similar to Consumer
        Reports. The magazine's ratings are available on a disk and are
        presented in a formula that gives relative weights to objective facts
        and subjective judgements.
 

        End Big Blue's Backup Blues.  J. Dickinson.
        PC Magazine, Aug. 20, 1985 v4 n17 p197-199.  Elec. Coll.: A638603.
        Abstract:  Backing up data and programs is unpleasant but necessary.
        Backup copies should be made on a regular basis. The creation of
        back-up copies is not very easy under PC-DOS. The DISKCOPY and COPY
        commands are not very fast. The included utility program, called
        BAC.COM, speeds up the back-up copy creation process. The program is
        written in BASIC for the IBM PC. Complete listings are included.
 

        Keeper of lost commands. (utility program that rekeys long commands)
        Steven Holzner.
        PC Magazine, July 23, 1985 v4 p191(5).  Mag. Coll.: 28G1251.  Bus.
        Coll.: .15P3066.  Elec. Coll.: A3865550.
 

        Watching for Disk Errors.  S. Holzner.
        PC Magazine, June 11, 1985 v4 n12 p263-264.  Elec. Coll.: A620399.
        Abstract:  Disk drives are subject to head contamination and natural
        wear and tear. Disk operating systems do not always indicate errors
        caused by this condition. A utility program for the IBM PC called
        DSKWATCH.COM allows the user to check for interim errors. Features of
        the program are described. A listing of the program in BASIC and
        Assembly Language is included.
 

        It's Odds and Ends Time.  P. Norton.
        PC Magazine, April 16, 1985 v4 n8 p103-105.  Elec. Coll.: A597544.
        Abstract:  Businessland is the IBM products retailer which now seems
        to be quickest at getting IBM's newest products, such as the Enhanced
        Graphics Adapter. A routine called DiskTest has been used to test the
        IBM PC XT and AT for disk access and data transfer performance. The AT
        was clocked at sixty to eighty percent faster than the XT. Realia
        Incorporated has two new products of interest to the IBM PC user:
        Spacemaker, a routine which squeezes programs and converts the EXE
        format to the COM format; and COBOL, which is the first implementation
        of the full, standard IBM mainframe COBOL.
 

        EV Capture Plus.
        PC Magazine, Jan. 22, 1985 v4 n2 p281.
        Abstract:  Visual Communications Networks' EV Capture Plus is a
        utility program that provides a graphics interface between popular
        applications and color printers or plotters. EV Capture Plus can be
        called on while a program is running. The package works with Lotus
        1-2-3, Symphony, Chartman and WordStar. List price is $125. A sample
        screen display is included.


        IBM Utilities Give DOS a Personal Touch.  T. Badgett.
        PC Magazine, Nov. 13, 1984 v3 n22 p39.
        Abstract:  Utilities I, Utilities II, DOS File Transfer, File
        Facility, and the StarProof Bridge are IBM's Personally Developed
        Software packages for the IBM PC. Utilities I includes the COMPRESS
        utility to change disk files so that they take up less space, the
        EXPAND utility to change them back, and the RETRIEVE utility to allow
        for the creation of abbreviations for DOS commands. Utilities II
        includes BACKUP to copy files to disk or subdirectory, UNMARK to allow
        users to set a disk's archive bits, the File Locator utility to help
        find files in subdirectories, and the Tree Display utility to
        graphically display relationships of subdirectories. DOS File Tracker
        reads directories from multiple disks and places the information in a
        separate disk file. File Facility is a DOS overlay that eliminates the
        PATH file-handling restriction in DOS 2.0. The StarProof Bridge
        provides an interface between WordStar and IBM's WordProof spelling
        checker. The StarProof Bridge's documentation is on-disk. The program
        is a good buy for $14.95 for those requiring its specific
        capabilities. All the other packages cost $19.95.


        Operation Cleanup.  S. Holzner.
        PC Magazine, July 10, 1984 v3 n13 p365-366.
        Abstract:  Cleanup is a utility program that will selectively delete
        IBM PC disk files. The program is written in BASIC and uses ninety
        eight bytes of memory. Cleanup runs with DOS 2.0 or 2.10.


        The File Command Mystery.  S. Manes.
        PC Magazine, Feb. 21, 1984 v3 n3 p305-318.
        Abstract:  File Command is a utility program from IBM which is judged
        to be less than user-friendly or easy to use. A new set of commands
        must be learned and the program is complex and confusing. The package
        lists for $35 and requires 64K RAM, PC-DOS, one disk drive and an
        80-column monitor.


        A PC in the Type Shop: Better Than Dedicated.  S. Wolbarst.
        PC Magazine, Jan. 24, 1984 v3 n1 p214-216.  Elec. Coll.: A530252.
        Abstract:  Dwan Typography uses IBM-PCs for typesetting. The PC can
        run software from different computers by using a utility program so
        the files may be read by the PC. The PC has provided speed and
        flexibility far beyond the dedicated typesetting computers used
        previously.
 

        Word Processing: A Fast Recovery from WordStar Disaster.  R. Kershaw.
        PC Magazine, June 1983 v2 n1 p411-412.
        Abstract:  Using the DEBUG program of the PC-DOS operating system
        enables the user of a word processing program on the IBM Personal
        Computer to recover data that might otherwise be lost. If, for
        example, an attempt is made to save a document created in a word
        processing session and copy it to a disk file when the disk is full,
        the word processing program will terminate with the new document left
        in memory. The DEBUG utility program can be used to find the document
        in core and copy it back to a disk file. Sample screen displays of the
        information in memory are included.


        Programming: Defining Function Keys with PC-DOS.  K.W. Wood.
        PC Magazine, June 1983 v2 n1 p423-424.
        Abstract:  The PC-DOS 2.0 operating system for the IBM Personal
        Computer allows the definition of the function keys to be changed. A
        utility program that reads the new KEY definitions from a file when
        certain settings are required is useful in customizing the KEY
        definitions for each program being run. A sample program is provided
        to change function keys based on variable input is included.


        Utilities: Simplifile: Takes The Mystery Out of File Names.  D.Z.
        Meilach.
        PC Magazine, March 1983 v1 n11 p382.
        Abstract:  Simplifile by Durant Software is a utility program written
        for the IBM Personal Computer to aid in managing files. The package
        allows for the addition of a forty-two character description of each
        file as it is created. The expanded descriptions are displayed when
        the disk directory is searched, making it easier to identify files.
        The package lists for $100. Sample screen displays of file listings
        are included.



  III.  The 75 articles from Infotrac from 1989 to the present
            with tag "Utility Program"

        Screens: a screen-saver manager. (scheduling screen savers for
        holidays, special events or days of the week) (Technology
        Tutorial)(Tutorial)  Neil J. Rubenking.
        PC Magazine, March 10, 1998 v17 n5 p259(5).  Mag. Coll.: 94M1946.
        Bus. Coll.: .109Y4812.  Elec. Coll.: A20314284.
        Abstract:  This issue's utility, called Screens, lets a user
        preschedule screen savers. For example, screen savers can be scheduled
        for holidays or birthdays, and selected screen savers automatically
        pop up as screen-savers-of-the-day. Screens, which can be downloaded
        from PC Magazine's Web site, is a 32-bit utility program that works
        with Windows 95 or Windows NT 3.51 or higher. Its source code was
        written using Borland's Delphi visual programming software. Screens is
        easy to install: a user simply runs its INSTALL program. Screens'
        files go into a subdirectory on a hard drive, and an icon appears in
        the PCs shell. A shortcut also appears on the user's StartUp folder so
        that the screen-saver-of-the-day is invoked when the system starts up.
        Screens can also be obtained by mail.
 

        Go Crazy with LogoMania! Design a replacement for the Windows 95
        animated logo. (freeware utility program lets users replace standard
        Win 95 logo with a custom bitmap) (includes related articles on
        programming and support, obtaining program files) (Product
        Information)(Column)  Neil J. Rubenking.
        PC Magazine, March 25, 1997 v16 n6 p355(5).  Mag. Coll.: 89K2918.
        Bus. Coll.: .101Z4210.  Elec. Coll.: A19168019.
        Abstract:  LogoMania, a free program that lets Windows 95 users
        replace the animated start-up and shutdown Microsoft logos with their
        own bitmaps showing moving backgrounds or shifting colors, is
        presented. Win 95 uses palette animation to create the illusion of
        animation and does not change the actual pixels when it animates a
        logo bitmap. LogoMania users select or generate the animation bitmap
        from an existing one, build a bitmap with Windows Paint or click the
        Generate button to have the program create an animated background. All
        bitmaps must be precisely 320 by 400 pixels in size and are stretched
        to 640 by 480 upon display. A detailed technical description of the
        program's operation is presented, along with instructions for creating
        logos, foregrounds and backgrounds and partial source code. LogoMania
        can be downloaded from CompuServe or the Internet.
 

        Kick-start programs with DropKick. (Windows utility program) (PC Tech:
        Utilities)(includes related articles on top 10 utilities, guide to
        utilities, how to obtain utilities online) (Column)  Douglas Boling.
        PC Magazine, Feb 21, 1995 v14 n4 p254(5).  Mag. Coll.: 77J1577. Bus.
        Coll.: .84W3869.  Elec. Coll.: A16398385.
        Abstract:  DropKick, a freeware utility that lets users launch
        programs with a single mouse click by clicking on an empty spot on the
        desktop to bring up a user-configurable menu of programs, is
        presented. Users add a program to DropKick's menu by opening the File
        Manager and dragging the file icon from File Manager to the DropKick
        window. Both the menu and DropKick itself are highly
        user-configurable. Users can specify which mouse button brings up the
        menu. Installation is simple, and there is a menu item for
        configuration. A detailed description of the program's operation is
        presented. DropKick implements drag and drop action through a few
        simple calls to the Windows drag and drop function; each window
        processes the WM_DROPFILES message to accept dropped files. A
        DKDLL.DLL file detects the mouse click on the desktop, monitoring
        events by subclassing the desktop window. DropKick uses several
        Windows API functions to create its menu and display it on the fly.
 

        Identifying CPUs through software. (PC Tech: Tutor) (Tutorial)
        (Column)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Jan 24, 1995 v14 n2 p241(3).  Mag. Coll.: 80B2436. Bus.
        Coll.: .84N4075.  Elec. Coll.: A16034969.
        Abstract:  The WHATCPU utility program has been upgraded in order to
        recognize the Pentium processor, the latest in the evolutionary line
        of Intel processors based on the x86 architecture. Users with a modem
        can access this utility via the WHATCP.ZIP element of the PC MagNnet's
        Utilities Tips Forum. Those without modems can simply type in a DEBUG
        script to derive an executed message. The key differences in the
        evolving x86 processor architecture can be viewed in terms of data
        line widths, processor speed, and memory-addressing capabilities. The
        early 8086 model offered 16 data lines or a 16-bit data bus access.
        The 8088 offered only 8 data lines and an 8-bit data bus interface.
        The Intel 80286 increased the width of data lines to 24, which enabled
        the CPU to command 16MB of memory. The Intel 80386 created a 24 data
        line interface, in the case of the 80386SX model and a 32 data line
        interface in the case of the 80386DX model. The Intel 80486 produced
        such refinements as fast static RAM and on-chip code. The latest
        entry, the Pentium processor, offers a 64-bit data interface.
 

        SHRED private disk files. (program for erasing files thoroughly) (PC
        Tech: Utilities)(includes related articles on top 10 utilities, guide
        to utilities, where to obtain utilities) (Column) (Tutorial) Michael
        J. Mefford.
        PC Magazine, Jan 10, 1995 v14 n1 p250(5).  Mag. Coll.: 77G1713. Bus.
        Coll.: .83X3923.  Elec. Coll.: A15951945.
        Abstract:  A freeware utility program called SHRED that erases
        sensitive files by overwriting them with zeros is presented. The
        normal DOS DEL command only removes a file from the directory; its
        contents are not actually removed from the disk until they are
        overwritten. SHRED, like DOS, recognizes wildcard characters and can
        be used with a variety of switch parameters. The S (subdirectory)
        switch tells it to erase files in subdirectories below the given
        directory as well as those in the main directory. The C switch acts as
        a safeguard, prompting the user for confirmation before a file is
        actually shredded. SHRED also will not destroy hidden or read-only
        files unless they are made visible with the ATTRIB command. The
        program prevents undeletion by software methods but is not completely
        secure because hardware devices can recover 'ghosts' of shredded
        files. Government requirements call for erased files to be overwritten
        seven times using a program such as WipeInfo in Norton Utilities.
 

        Utility software. (Stac Electronics' Stacker 4.0 compression utility,
        Helix Software's Cloaking Developer's Toolkit and Traveling Software's
        LapLink for Windows file transfer package) (The 11th Annual Awards for
        Technical Excellence)  Michael J. Miller.
        PC Magazine, Dec 20, 1994 v13 n22 p136(1).  Mag. Coll.: 76K1943. Bus.
        Coll.: .83Q3244.  Elec. Coll.: A16294101.
        Abstract:  Stac Electronics' Stacker 4.0 disk-compression program
        earns a PC Magazine Award for Technical Excellence as the best utility
        program of 1994. The product improves on previous disk-compression
        technology by using a technique called sector packing, freeing space
        on the last sector in a cluster, which is almost always partially
        unused. Stacker eliminates the waste of disk space caused by using
        entire sectors to store small files. Runner-up awards go to Helix
        Software's Cloaking technology in the Cloaking Developer's Toolkit,
        which allows executable code for TSRs and device drivers to be loaded
        into extended memory, and Traveling Software's LapLink for Windows
        file-transfer package, the first true Windows-hosted version of an
        already mature product that offers the powerful SpeedSync technology
        for identifying and transferring only the changes made to a file since
        the last time it was transferred.
 

        PasteBoard: a step beyond the Clipboard. (includes related articles on
        top 10 utilities, description of PasteBoard, how to get files online)
        (PC Tech: Utilities) (Column)  Robert Lausevic.
        PC Magazine, Oct 25, 1994 v13 n18 p308(5).  Mag. Coll.: 76A2901. Bus.
        Coll.: .81Y3745.  Elec. Coll.: A16279076.
        Abstract:  PasteBoard, a simple utility program that modifies and
        enhances the Windows clipboard, is presented. Windows Clipboard
        empties its contents every time anything is cut or copied to it,
        forcing users to cut and paste only contiguous portions of text at a
        time. PasteBoard keeps a 'pasteboard' in addition to the Clipboard
        that concatenates each block of text copied to the Clipboard onto the
        text already there. It works with pure ASCII files instead of the
        Clipboard's .CLP files; it cannot store bitmaps or other binary data,
        but adds editing capability. Users launch PasteBoard first and then
        use the word processor text editor in a normal manner, switching to
        PasteBoard when ready to paste collected text. The program is written
        in Microsoft Visual Basic 3.0 and works by appending new text stored
        in the Clipboard to the pasteboard; the Timer control lets users
        periodically check what has been stored. A detailed technical
        description of the program's operation is included.
 

        WinPointer highlights your presentations. (includes related articles
        on top 10 utilities, guide to monthly utility, where to obtain
        utility) (PC Tech: Utilities) (Column)  Jonathan Zuck.
        PC Magazine, Oct 11, 1994 v13 n17 p351(6).  Mag. Coll.: 75M2348. Bus.
        Coll.: .81X3010.  Elec. Coll.: A16252550.
        Abstract:  WinPointer, a utility program that lets users draw on top
        of any window by pressing a hotkey, is presented. The program is
        especially useful for those giving presentations and is far less
        expensive than the $2,000 'Telestrator' used by professional
        sportscasters to indicate plays. It is minimized and ready for drawing
        when first launched; pressing Ctrl-C causes the cursor to change to a
        large arrow pointing straight up that indicates draw mode. Users can
        then draw as they would in any drawing package. WinPointer includes a
        keyboard interface for laptop users as well. Configuring it is a
        simple process that involves double-clicking on the minimized icon; a
        dialog box lets the user select what key to use as a hotkey. The
        hotkey works exactly as it does in Windows Macro Recorder. The program
        first saves the desktop as a bitmap with the Visual Basic SavePicture
        command and then places the bitmap on a VB form which can be drawn on
        top of with VB drawing tools. Sample source code is included, along
        with a detailed description of the program's operation. WinPointer is
        available from online services.
 

        Turn wallpaper into AllPaper. (AllPaper freeware utility program
        stretches .BMP images to fill screen) (PC Tech: Utilities)(includes
        related articles on top 10 utilities, BMP file format, guide to
        utilities, how to obtain utility online) (Column)  Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Sept 13, 1994 v13 n15 p350(8).  Mag. Coll.: 75E2777.
        Bus. Coll.: .81N3212.  Elec. Coll.: A16190492.
        Abstract:  AllPaper is a freeware utility that lets users obtain
        wallpaper files in any size from bulletin boards and resize them to
        fit the screen. The program can modify an image's resolution and
        dimensions to fit any display setup. Windows wallpaper files are
        stored as native .BMP files. Users can create custom wallpaper using
        Paintbrush or any paint program that supports the .BMP format.
        AllPaper reads a file and creates a new file with the dimensions and
        resolution the user specifies; the original .BMP file is not altered
        unless the user requests it. A detailed description of how the program
        operates is presented. Windows offers its own function for block
        transferring pixels from one location to another, but AllPaper is
        somewhat more complex because it must avoid creating bitmap objects
        and deal directly with device-independent bitmaps.
 

        Copy disks fast with QUIKCOPY. (utility program for replacing MS-DOS'
        6.2's DISKCOPY command) (PC Tech: Utilities) (Column) (includes
        related articles on top ten utilities, overview of QUIKCOPY program
        and instructions on obtaining free utilities) (Tutorial)  Michael
        Holmes and Bob Flanders.
        PC Magazine, August 1994 v13 n14 p411(5).  Mag. Coll.: 75C2718. Bus.
        Coll.: .83W4581.  Elec. Coll.: A15579215.
        Abstract:  MS-DOS users can replace the DOS DISKCOPY command found in
        versions 6.2 and higher of the operating system with a useful
        programming utility called QUIKCOPY. The QUIKCOPY utility allows users
        to copy an entire disk in one pass as does DISKCOPY. QUIKCOPY,
        however, uses extended or expanded memory for storage instead of a RAM
        disk. The utility also provides a method for determining whether or
        not a disk is DOS formatted, and offers a means for calculating
        physical disk addresses for low-level disk I/O. In addition, QUIKCOPY
        outperforms DISKCOPY in its reporting abilities. The QUIKCOPY program
        will display a bar graph of progress as it copies the disk. The
        utility will also list the source disk label and capacity, the amount
        of memory required, the type of copy algorithm utilized and other
        valuable data. Instructions for creating the QUIKCOPY utility are also
        provided.
 

        What's on top? Windows' Z-Order figures it out. (method used for
        ordering, updating of open windows in Microsoft's Windows graphical
        user interface; utility program presented for assigning unchanging
        topmost status to given window) (PC Tech: Tutor)(Column) (Tutorial)
        Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, March 15, 1994 v13 n5 p311(3).  Mag. Coll.: 73L1736.
        Bus. Coll.: .78T4079.  Elec. Coll.: A15066528.
        Abstract:  The ordering of display windows in Microsoft's Windows
        graphical user interface (GUI) is controlled by an obscure utility
        known as Z-order. This function's essential task is to assign a number
        along an imaginary z axis to each window that is opened, and to update
        the ordering as the user rearranges the onscreen windows. This is how,
        even though overlapping windows share space along the x and y axes,
        the program is able to determine which ones are to be made active or
        inactive. This is especially important during screen redraw
        operations; open windows are numbered from 1 to n, where n is the
        total number displayed. When the screen is redrawn, the
        higher-numbered windows appear closer to the front of the screen.
        Windows' jargon defines windows as being topmost or nontopmost,
        depending on their numbering. A utility program is presented that will
        keep a certain window in topmost status even when inactive. This may
        prove useful for keeping utility programs such as calculators
        accessible at all times.
 

        The Windows NT path functions. (PC Tech: Environments)(Column)
        (Tutorial)  Charles Petzold.
        PC Magazine, March 15, 1994 v13 n5 p322(5).  Mag. Coll.: 73L1747.
        Bus. Coll.: .78T4090.  Elec. Coll.: A15066776.
        Abstract:  Microsoft's Windows NT operating system uses the Graphics
        Device Interface (GDI) subsystem to assist in creating graphics paths
        for facilities not otherwise available. These paths provide the
        information necessary to perform such functions as joining lines and
        curves with a predefined style, as well as for filling areas with
        patterns or colors. Nine such functions, used specifically for
        creating and rendering paths, are included in Windows NT. These are
        used between the BeginPath and EndPath calls to create path
        definitions. A utility/demonstration program, PATHOPS.C, is presented
        as a method to demonstrate how paths are filled, along with general
        directions for using the path functions.
 

        Fire up Windows programs fast with HK.EXE. (includes related articles
        on 'Take Command of Windows' contest and downloading utilities)
        (Utilities) (Column)  Douglas Boling.
        PC Magazine, Oct 12, 1993 v12 n17 p365(7).  Mag. Coll.: 71H3072. Bus.
        Coll.: .73W1992.  Elec. Coll.: A14397578.
        Abstract:  HK.EXE is a free utility program that expands Microsoft
        Windows' ability to define hot keys that launch applications. In
        Windows 3.1's Program Manager, Microsoft provided a hot-key
        capability. However, hot keys cannot be used to launch programs that
        have not yet been started and the variety of hot-key combinations
        allowed is severely limited. HK.EXE addresses both these problems. It
        allows almost any shift combination to be used as a hot key, with the
        exception of combinations involving the tab key and those such as
        Alt-Esc that are used by Windows. Users should be careful not to
        assign as hot keys any key strokes they must use in applications
        software. HK.EXE will take precedence in these cases and may prevent
        users from accessing certain commands.
 

        Launch your applications the easy way with BTNGO. (ButtonGo utility
        for Microsoft Windows) (includes related articles on the Take Command
        of Windows Contest and utilities available on the PC MagNet on-line
        service) (Utilities) (Column)  John Deurbrouck.
        PC Magazine, Sept 14, 1993 v12 n15 p347(5).  Bus. Coll.: 74W4669.
        Elec. Coll.: .A14185225.
        Abstract:  The ButtonGo (BTNGO) program management utility for easy
        program launching in Microsoft Windows is presented. The utility
        enables users to set up a button bar to show the icons of programs
        they use most. Users can choose Program Manager group files to turn
        into button bars automatically. Some icons may be duplicates, but
        users can view the original file names as well as the icons. In
        addition to turning existing Program Manager groups into button bars,
        users can create groups. Users can even create associations between
        the utility and the group extension. Then users can easily start BTNGO
        when they enter Windows. Users need to make sure groups do not get too
        large, or button bars will extend off the screen. Each group file has
        a section. Minor difficulties result from BTNGO's independence from
        Program Manager. For example, changes to a group in Program Manager
        may not appear in the button bar.
 

        FINDEXEC locates the program that will run. (when programs have the
        same name) (includes related article on the PCMagNet on-line service
        and quick reference guide to FINDEXEC) (Utilities) (Tutorial) Douglas
        Boling.
        PC Magazine, August 1993 v12 n14 p406(8).  Mag. Coll.: 69M2403. Bus.
        Coll.: .72X4148.  Elec. Coll.: A14046063.
        Abstract:  The FINDEXEC utility will search for files when users are
        trying to differentiate between applications of the same name.
        FINDEXEC prints out a program's location without executing the
        program. The utility operates in DOS, OS/2 or Windows, provided the
        operating system is in character mode rather than graphics mode. The
        utility searches all drives and directories on the system PATH to find
        the location of an executable file. FINDEXEC's syntax is FINDEXEC (/W)
        (/V /Ln) (/?) program_name. FINDEXEC searches for programs basically
        the same way the three operating systems do, looking in the current
        directory and checking the directories listed in the PATH statement.
        In Windows, the utility also checks the Windows and Windows system
        directories. After finding a Windows or OS/2 executable file, the
        utility locates any dynamic link libraries (DLLs) the program needs.
 

        FIND: a text-search utility for Windows 3.1. (includes related
        articles on PC MagNet utilities and on how to install FIND.DLL)
        (Utilities)  Douglas Boling.
        PC Magazine, July 1993 v12 n13 p387(6).  Mag. Coll.: 69H2282.  Bus.
        Coll.: .72Q2960.  Elec. Coll.: A13968735.
        Abstract:  The FIND file-search utility program for Windows 3.1 lets
        users scan a single file, a set of files, or an entire partition to
        find all occurrences of a specific string without resorting to the DOS
        box. The program searches in the background, so users can work on
        another task during the search, and it integrates seamlessly into the
        Windows File Manager, so the services it provides supplement those in
        File Manager. FIND adds an extra menu item to File Manager after it is
        installed; File Manager extensions must be implemented as a dynamic
        link library (DLL) with an external entry point with the name
        FMExtensionProc. File Manager sends an FMEVENT_LOAD message to the
        extension DLL when it is loaded; the extension must fill in the
        dwSize, szMenuName, and hMenu fields in the FMS_LOAD structure before
        returning from the FMEVENT_LOAD call.
 

        Transverter Pro: graphics file sharing across platforms. (TechPool
        Software Inc.'s Transverter Pro for Windows graphics file import
        utility program) (New & Improved)(Brief Article) (Product
        Announcement)  Brad Grimes.
        PC Magazine, June 15, 1993 v12 n11 p66(1).  Mag. Coll.: 69D2273. Bus.
        Coll.: .71W3531.  Elec. Coll.: A13761980.
 

        OS/2 utility displays audio, image, and video files. (Commix SP Inc.'s
        DisplayMaster image file management utility program) (New &
        Improved)(Brief Article) (Product Announcement)  Brad Grimes.
        PC Magazine, June 15, 1993 v12 n11 p66(1).  Mag. Coll.: 69D2273. Bus.
        Coll.: .71W3531.  Elec. Coll.: A13761982.
 

        Quick-boot your PC and protect your data with BOOT2C and BOOTPW.
        (includes related article on utilities available via modem)
        (Utilities)  Douglas Boling.
        PC Magazine, March 30, 1993 v12 n6 p314(5).  Mag. Coll.: 68B2443.
        Bus. Coll.: .70S3878.  Elec. Coll.: A13500414.
        Abstract:  A utility program called BOOT2C boots microcomputers more
        efficiently. A utility called BOOTPW password-protects either a floppy
        disk or a hard disk drive. BOOT2C installs a small amount of code in
        the boot sector of the drive A: floppy disk. This code tells the
        machine to launch the machine's operating system from the hard disk.
        Running the BOOT2C can result in faster booting because the machine
        will not encounter an error and try to process it when it tries to
        read A: drive. BOOT2C works with computers running under DOS or OS/2.
        BOOTPW-protected disks will not be recognized as a valid disk by DOS
        or OS/2 until the user supplies the proper password. Passwords can be
        up to eight characters long. After the user enters the password, the
        system asks for it again to make certain it has been entered
        correctly. BOOTPW protects at the operating system level.
 

        DoubleDisk GOLD improves disk compression, access time. (Vertisoft
        Systems' DoubleDisk GOLD version 6.0 data compression utility program)
        (New & Improved)(Brief Article) (Product Announcement)  Brad Grimes.
        PC Magazine, March 16, 1993 v12 n5 p62(2).  Mag. Coll.: 68A1695. Bus.
        Coll.: .70Q3294.  Elec. Coll.: A13414586.
 

        Installing your application is easy with PC-SETUP. (includes related
        articles on downloading PC Magazine utilities from PC MagNet on
        CompuServe, and on the PC-SETUP installation utility program)
        (Utilities)(Column) (Tutorial)  Ethan Winer.
        PC Magazine, March 16, 1993 v12 n5 p334(6).  Mag. Coll.: 68A1943.
        Bus. Coll.: .70Q3560.  Elec. Coll.: A13414842.
        Abstract:  The PC-SETUP utility program is intended to install program
        or data files that have been compressed with the PKZIP
        data-compression shareware program. PC-SETUP supports multiple disks
        and will use or create any needed directories and subdirectories on
        the hard disk; file installation can be automatic or manual, and
        comments can be included to help users. The procedure need not be
        repeated after the first installation to install a different printer
        driver or other optional files, and no printed user instructions are
        required. The program requires at least 256Kbytes of RAM and DOS 3.0
        or later. Using PC-SETUP, setting up for installation, setting
        destination directories, selecting files for installation, installing
        to nested directories, programming considerations, the DOS EXEC
        function and determining the program name are described.
 

        Optimize your disk drive efficiency with DEFRAGR. (Utilities) (Column)
        Bob Flanders and Michael Holmes.
        PC Magazine, Feb 23, 1993 v12 n4 p335(7).  Mag. Coll.: 67K2772. Bus.
        Coll.: .69V3702.  Elec. Coll.: A13375826.
        Abstract:  A freeware utility program called DEFRAG that optimizes
        hard disk performance by eliminating file fragmentation is presented.
        Fragmentation is almost inevitable when disks are used normally
        because files saved on the disk are stored in pieces that may be
        physically distant from each other. A defragmentation program moves
        file fragments closer together so that they are contiguous, reducing
        the amount of time the disk head must spend reading a file. DEFRAGR
        has a very simple syntax and is easy to use. It displays several lines
        of drive information when it executes, and a Status line reports
        progress. The program should not be run under Windows or any
        multitasking system, and its output should not be redirected to the
        drive being defragmented. DEFRAGR will not try to move hidden, system
        or read-only files because they are very system-dependent. All
        memory-resident programs except disk-caching programs must be disabled
        or unloaded before using DEFRAGR. Write caching should be disabled to
        avoid damage to files. A detailed technical description of DEFRAGR is
        presented.
 

        Command Center Windows utility arrives on the launch pad. (Artist
        Graphics' utility program) (New & Improved)(Brief Article) (Product
        Announcement)  Emerson Andrew Torgan.
        PC Magazine, Jan 26, 1993 v12 n2 p64(1).  Mag. Coll.: 67F2647.  Bus.
        Coll.: .69Q3776.  Elec. Coll.: A13315975.
 

        Bring variety to your Windows desktop with CHANGER. (utility for
        altering Microsoft Windows 3.1's desktop each time it runs)(includes
        related article on accessing utilities via PC MagNet) (Utilities)
        (Column)  Douglas Boling.
        PC Magazine, Jan 26, 1993 v12 n2 p327(6).  Mag. Coll.: 67F2876. Bus.
        Coll.: .69Q4009.  Elec. Coll.: A13317367.
        Abstract:  Microsoft Windows 3.1 desktops can be altered each time the
        program is run with the CHANGER utility program. CHANGER allows users
        to select wallpapers, color schemes, desktop patterns and screen
        savers available in Windows, and options can be limited to certain
        favorites or to a preset sequence of selections. The program runs
        automatically after being installed and configured. The utility, which
        is available on PC MagNet, is used to describe how Windows handles
        wallpaper and the other desktop options. Extensive details are
        included.
 

        Mailing lists are a snap to print with MLPRINT. (Utilities)(includes
        related articles on obtaining utilities by modem, command reference
        card, updates to earlier utilities) (Column)  Jay Munro.
        PC Magazine, Dec 8, 1992 v11 n21 p405(8).  Mag. Coll.: 66M2830. Bus.
        Coll.: .68V4282.  Elec. Coll.: A12912964.
        Abstract:  MLPRINT.COM, a free utility program for printing mailing
        lists on HP LaserJet and compatible printers, is described in detail.
        The program implements not only LaserJet label and envelope standards
        but also Postnet bar codes and the US Postal Service (USPS)-approved
        address format. It has HP-compatible printer escape codes built in.
        The user should first select names and arrange them into the proper
        sequence using a database program; MLPRINT is for formatting and
        printing only. MLPRINT uses the standard Courier monospaced font. The
        ZIP code must be the last item in the address block in order for
        MLPRINT to build a bar code. The program follows the same rules as
        post-office scanners when interpreting the delivery address.
        Instructions for using the program are given, and a detailed technical
        description of how it works is presented.
 

        CDPLAYER make your CD-ROM drive sing. (utility program to play audio
        compact discs in CD-ROM drives) (includes related articles on utility
        program updates and retrieving utilities from PC MagNet) (Utilities)
        Jeff Prosise.
        PC Magazine, Nov 24, 1992 v11 n20 p433(8).  Mag. Coll.: 66K2838. Bus.
        Coll.: .68Q3959.  Elec. Coll.: A12768046.
        Abstract:  Standard CD-ROM drives can be used to play audio compact
        discs. Microsoft Windows 3.1's Media Control Interface can be used to
        write a program to perform this task. CDPLAYER requires the MSCDEX
        CD-ROM extensions and the Windows CD Audio driver. The program
        displays buttons that simulate the control buttons on an audio CD
        player and includes many features common to CD players. Extensive
        details about the design of the program and its interaction with the
        Windows environment are included.
 

        TIME!: a threefold digital timer for Windows. (Microsoft
        Windows)(includes related articles on PC Magazine utilities updates,
        using the DigitClass Control and some utility programs available via
        modem)(Utilities) (Tutorial)  Douglas Boling.
        PC Magazine, Nov 10, 1992 v11 n19 p361(6).  Mag. Coll.: 66J2890. Bus.
        Coll.: .68N4467.  Elec. Coll.: A12774739.
        Abstract:  TIME!.EXE, a utility program that can be downloaded from
        Library 2 of the Utilities/Tips Forum on PC MagNet archived as
        TIME!.ZIP, is a triple digital timer that enables users to make
        customized controls in the Microsoft Windows environment. TIME! works
        very much like a cooking timer; it consists of three independent
        timers and each has the ability to be set, started and stopped.
        Because all the timers use the same display, only one timer's setting
        can appear at one time. All three timers can, nevertheless, be used
        simultaneously. Before users decide to use TIME! to implement a custom
        control, they should first ask themselves if it is necessary.
        Microsoft Windows' standard interface is extremely pliable and
        consists of a variety of controls for gathering user input and
        presenting outcomes.
 

        Keep your PC's clock right to the second with WTIME. (free
        utility)(includes related article on retrieving utilities via modem)
        (Utilities)  John Deurbrouck.
        PC Magazine, Oct 27, 1992 v11 n18 p361(6).  Mag. Coll.: 66E2548. Bus.
        Coll.: .67X4495.  Elec. Coll.: A12741291.
        Abstract:  WTIME.EXE is a free utility program available over online
        information services. The utility corrects IBM PC and compatible
        microcomputers' clocks so that the time displayed is accurate to
        within a second. WTIME.EXE runs under Microsoft Windows 3.x, or within
        OS/2's Windows implementation. The utility calls the National
        Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) via the microcomputer's
        modem every time Windows is launched. NIST maintains the Automatic
        Computer Time Service (ACTS). Users simply download WTIME.EXE from PC
        MagNet in addition to accessing the C source code from PC MagNet. A
        compiler such as Microsoft Quick C for Windows 1.0 is needed to
        recompile the source code.
 

        The bugs you'll want to keep in your Windows 3.1 setup. (the BUGS
        screen-saver utility)(includes related articles on downloading PC
        Magazine utilities by modem and on the most recent utility updates)
        (Programming: Utilities)(Column) (Tutorial)  Douglas Boling.
        PC Magazine, Oct 13, 1992 v11 n17 p371(7).  Mag. Coll.: 66B2804. Bus.
        Coll.: .67V4257.  Elec. Coll.: A12658511.
        Abstract:  The screen-saver utility program called BUGS is listed; it
        creates little 'bugs' on the screen whenever the monitor is left idle
        for more than a few minutes and restores the original screen with any
        keystroke or mouse movement. It takes awhile for BUGS to blank the
        entire screen, so users who need an immediate screen blanker will need
        to use a different screen saver; the program only works with Microsoft
        Windows version 3.1. BUGS.SCR can be downloaded from Library 2 (PCMag
        Utils) of the Utilities/Tips Forum on PC MagNet; BUGS.ZIP offers the C
        source code and the required include and resource files. Users without
        modems can get the executable and source code directly from PC
        Magazine by sending a postcard to the magazine. Installation
        instructions and the program's configuration options are described;
        also described is the static library, SCRNSAVE.LIB, in the Windows 3.1
        Software Development Kit.
 

        Keep indispensable applications handy with TOTOP. (Microsoft Windows
        3.1 operating system enhancement for maximizing screen space)(includes
        related articles on downloading utility programs via modem, how to
        compile TOTOP, Microsoft Windows' Z-order function for determining the
        height of a window and a directory of utility program upgrades)
        (Utilities) (Tutorial)  John Deurbrouck.
        PC Magazine, Sept 29, 1992 v11 n16 p363(6).  Mag. Coll.: 65M2226.
        Bus. Coll.: .67Q3669.  Elec. Coll.: A12563814.
        Abstract:  TOTOP is a operating system enhancement that helps users of
        Microsoft Windows 3.1 graphical user interface (GUI) fully utilize the
        GUI's windowing capabilities. TOTOP is a freeware program available
        from PC Magazine. Users often view the Windows applications they are
        working on in full-screen at the expense of seeing other windows or
        icons. TOTOP allows an application or icon not in use to be floated
        above an active application without deactivating the active
        application. A pull-down menu reveals TOTOP's functions. The TOP
        function floats an application, while the BOTTOM function returns an
        application to its original location. TOTOP will generate error beeps
        if a floating window is covering an area where an active application
        must call up a dialog box. To avoid this conflict, the floating window
        can be sunk or minimized so the dialog box is no longer covered. TOTOP
        is easy to use and because it uses only 9Kbytes, it does not affect
        system performance.
 

        Synergy offers a new approach to Windows utilities. (SynApps Software
        Inc. announces Synergy utility program; Microsoft Corp.'s Windows
        graphical user interface)(Brief Article) (New & Improved) (Product
        Announcement)  Emerson Andrew Torgan.
        PC Magazine, July 1992 v11 n13 p59(1).  Mag. Coll.: 65C2352.  Bus.
        Coll.: .66N4329.  Elec. Coll.: A12358113.
 

        Take control of your Windows installations with INCTRL. (includes
        related articles on obtaining utilities by modem, updates to existing
        utilities)(Utilities) (Tutorial)  Neil J. Rubenking.
        PC Magazine, July 1992 v11 n13 p443(9).  Mag. Coll.: 65C2714.  Bus.
        Coll.: .66N4687.  Elec. Coll.: A12348173.
        Abstract:  INCTRL is a utility program that supervises a Windows
        application's install utility and writes a report file specifying
        added files and directories, changed files, deleted files and
        directories, new sections and keys in configuration files and changed
        keys. Users can use the report to undo any unwanted changes made by
        the install program. INCTRL is loaded from the Program Manager and
        requires protected mode to operate. It first memorizes the file layout
        of all hard disks and makes copies of the WIN.INI and SYSTEM.INI
        files. After the installation, the program writes a header for its
        output report, scans disks again and checks them against the previous
        disk contents. INCTRL scans all fixed disks on a system by default;
        users can configure it to exclude partitions that are never used for
        Windows applications. A detailed technical description of the
        program's design and operation is presented.
 

        Direct Access now available for Windows. (Fifth Generation Systems
        introduces Direct Access Windows utility program)(Brief Article)
        (Product Announcement)  Emerson Andrew Torgan.
        PC Magazine, June 16, 1992 v11 n11 p59(2).  Mag. Coll.: 64J2480. Bus.
        Coll.: .65U3008.  Elec. Coll.: A12160340.
 

        Swans! Mirrors! More fish! (Berkeley Systems Inc.'s After Dark for
        Windows 2.0 utility program)(Microsoft Corp.'s Windows graphical user
        interface) (New & Improved)(Brief Article) (Product Announcement)
        Emerson Andrew Torgan.
        PC Magazine, May 26, 1992 v11 n10 p64(2).  Mag. Coll.: 64G2677. Bus.
        Coll.: .65Q3635.  Elec. Coll.: A12213937.
 

        Utilities: you can end the download delay with BACKDOWN.EXE. (includes
        related article on how to create and use scripts, program
        messages)(Programming) (Tutorial)  Bob Flanders and Michael Holmes.
        PC Magazine, May 12, 1992 v11 n9 p380(8).  Mag. Coll.: 64D2805. Bus.
        Coll.: .65P3658.  Elec. Coll.: A12162057.
        Abstract:  BACKDOWN.EXE, a utility program that lets users start and
        manage communications sessions and file downloads in the background
        while continuing to work in a foreground application, is discussed.
        BACKDOWN and its related protocol files are available through the PC
        MagNet online service. Bringing up the program entails some complex
        syntax, but it is very flexible and allows the creation of elaborate
        scripts. A technical description of the program's operation is
        presented, along with detailed instructions for its use.
 

        WINPTR lets your find your Windows cursor on a laptop. (includes
        related article on how to download file) ( Utilities)(column)
        (Tutorial)  Douglas Boling.
        PC Magazine, March 17, 1992 v11 n5 p417(5).  Mag. Coll.: 63F2822.
        Bus. Coll.: .63W4792.  Elec. Coll.: A11932843.
        Abstract:  WINPTR, a utility program that helps users locate the
        Microsoft Windows cursor on the liquid crystal displays (LCDs) of
        laptop computers, is presented. Today's laptops have more than enough
        power to run Windows, but the cursor tends to disappear because the
        screens do not have the speed and contrast to handle the details of a
        graphical interface. WINPTR highlights the pointer so that it stands
        out clearly on a washed-out LCD screen. It is also useful for
        presentations on large-screen projectors. A detailed technical
        description of WINPTR's design is presented. The program has one
        optional command-line argument; the /i switch automatically minimizes
        it at startup. WINPTR uses a modeless dialog box as its primary window
        and divides its functions into an executable file and a dynamic link
        library (DLL) file. Special functions control window creation and
        changes in scroll bars; the DLL handles the actual highlighting of the
        pointer.
 

        Looks like a form, feels like e-mail. (electronic mail systems)(work
        group software) (Trends)  Rick Ayre.
        PC Magazine, Feb 25, 1992 v11 n4 p29(2).  Mag. Coll.: 63E2598.  Bus.
        Coll.: .63T4313.  Elec. Coll.: A11771628.
        Abstract:  Office automation software, groupware and workflow software
        packages feature applications that look like forms but have data base
        access and electronic mail capabilities. Lotus Development Corp's
        Lotus Notes office automation software is the most established of a
        variety of products gaining popularity. Beyond Technologies'
        BeyondMail electronic mail system, Reach Software Corp's WorkMan
        office automation software and JetForm Corp's JetForm forms generation
        software are providing competition for Lotus Notes. Each product
        utilizes electronic mail capabilities to disperse data, and they all
        connect with data bases for access and storage of information. The
        WorkMan and Lotus Notes products are considered program development
        environments, and BeyondMail is targeted for individual users. The
        JetForm product is more of an electronic mail-enabled software package
        than a program development utility.
 

        PCREMOT2 transfers files from your office to your home. (includes
        related article on using the utility program) (Utilities)(column)
        (Tutorial)  Terry Lahman and Kevin Sims.
        PC Magazine, Jan 28, 1992 v11 n2 p309(6).  Mag. Coll.: 63A2736. Bus.
        Coll.: .63N5714.  Elec. Coll.: A11713440.
        Abstract:  PCREMOT2, a communications utility that allows users to
        display the screen contents of a host computer on a remote computer
        and transfer files between the host and remote computers, is
        described. PCREMOT2 replaces PCREMOTE, which lacks file transfer
        capabilities. The new utility uses a separate program called ZCOPY to
        perform the actual file transfer. The utility is limited to running
        text-based software in 25-row by 80-column mode, although any type of
        files can be transferred in the background. Extensive details
        regarding the design and function of the utility are included.
 

        If you bill clients by the hour, TRACKR can simplify your life.
        (Utilities) (includes related article on downloading utilities from PC
        MagNet) (Column)  Scott Chaney.
        PC Magazine, Jan 14, 1992 v11 n1 p387(3).  Mag. Coll.: 62L2786. Bus.
        Coll.: .62Z4334.  Elec. Coll.: A11660084.
        Abstract:  The TRACKR utility software available from PC MagNet is a
        great program for keeping track of how much time a user spends on an
        on-line service for a client, or how a user's time on the computer is
        divided between business and recreation. TRACKR is a 7Kbyte
        memory-resident utility that lets the user create or switch tasks at
        any time, temporarily stopping the clock; switch applications while
        the clock is running; combine several separately timed tasks for the
        same client into one billing report; and update a task log easily and
        quickly. Partial-hour calculations can be performed in increments of
        one minute. To use the program, a CLIENT.DAT file must be created to
        hold billing information for each client. Any ASCII editor can be used
        to create the file. Sample entries and file organization tips are
        included.
 

        DOS menu system adds software-based security. (MenuWorks Advanced and
        MenuWorks Total Security from PC Dynamics Inc.) (brief article)
        (Product Announcement)  Nate Zelnick.
        PC Magazine, Dec 31, 1991 v10 n22 p66(1).  Mag. Coll.: 62J2591. Bus.
        Coll.: .62U4283.  Elec. Coll.: A11609076.
 
            Major upgrade for Pandora. (script language utility) (PC MagNet
        News) PC Magazine, Dec 31, 1991 v10 n22 p370(1).  Mag. Coll.: 62J2873.
        Bus. Coll.: .62U4561.  Elec. Coll.: A11638980.

            Building better PCs: you tell us how. (column) Jim Seymour. PC
        Magazine, Nov 12, 1991 v10 n19 p97(2).  Mag. Coll.: 62C2590.  Bus.
        Coll.: .61Y3709.  Elec. Coll.: A11481128.
  
            Customize your PC Magazine utilities with PATCH.COM. (includes
        related articles on the .ZIF file template, PC Magazine utilities
        updates and the PATCH command) (Utilities)(column) (tutorial) Michael
        J. Mefford. PC Magazine, Nov 12, 1991 v10 n19 p425(8).  Mag. Coll.:
        62C2878.  Bus. Coll.: 61Y3998.  Elec. Coll.: A11471388.
  
            IntelligenceWare ships error-detection tool for dBASE and Lotus.
        (IntelligenceWare DBS: Database Supervisor) (New & Improved) (product
        announcement) Cristina Cordova and Nate Zelnick. PC Magazine, Sept 10,
        1991 v10 n15 p64(1).  Mag. Coll.: 61C2409.  Bus. Coll.: 60W2614.
        Elec. Coll.: .A11116411.
  
            Two utilities magnify VGA laptop images. (General Business
        Machines Corp.'s LapZOOM and Microsystems Software Inc.'s MAGic
        provide screen magnification) (New & Improved) (product announcement)
        Cristina Cordova and Nate Zelnick. PC Magazine, July 1991 v10 n13
        p58(1).  Mag. Coll.: 60J2539.  Bus. Coll.: 59T4157.  Elec. Coll.:
        A10855256.
  
            $79 utility customizes mouse and cursors. (Fanfare Software Right
        On!, Magic Cursor! utility programs) (New & Improved) (product
        announcement) Cristina Cordova and Nate Zelnick. PC Magazine, June 25,
        1991 v10 n12 p58(1).  Mag. Coll.: 60F2635.  Bus. Coll.: 59U3372.
        Elec. Coll.: .A10799302.
  
            Extend your WIN.INI extensions with WINEXT.EXE. (Utilities)
        (column) Fran Finnegan. PC Magazine, June 25, 1991 v10 n12 p391(4).
        Mag. Coll.: .60F2928.  Bus. Coll.: 59U3699.  Elec. Coll.: A10814904.
  
            $79 Windows utility schedules events for background operation.
        (Aldia Systems Inc.'s Time After Time event processing software
        package)(New & Improved) (product announcement) Cristina Cordova and
        Nate Zelnick. PC Magazine, June 11, 1991 v10 n11 p60(1).  Mag. Coll.:
        60D2595.  Bus. Coll.: 59N3262.  Elec. Coll.: A10763886.
  
            DiskDupe Pro formats and copies floppies. (Micro System Designs
        Inc.'s copying and formatting utility program)(New & Improved)
        (product announcement) Cristina Cordova and Nate Zelnick. PC Magazine,
        June 11, 1991 v10 n11 p60(1).  Mag. Coll.: 60D2595.  Bus. Coll.:
        59N3262.  Elec. Coll.: A10763898.
  
            Get control over your WIN.INI file with PROGSET.EXE. (Utilities)
        (tutorial) Robert Dickinson. PC Magazine, May 28, 1991 v10 n10
        p355(5).  Mag. Coll.: 60A2904.  Bus. Coll.: 58W3764.  Elec. Coll.:
        A10719557.
  
            Restore your Windows 3.0 sessions with WINSAVER.EXE. (Utilities)
        (column) Richard Hale Shaw. PC Magazine, May 14, 1991 v10 n9 p391(3).
        Mag. Coll.: .59M2892.  Bus. Coll.: 58T2609.  Elec. Coll.: A10648516.
  
            Dynamic Data Exchange and the clipboard in Windows. (Power
        Programming) (tutorial) Ray Duncan. PC Magazine, May 14, 1991 v10 n9
        p405(5).  Mag. Coll.: 59M2906.  Bus. Coll.: 58T2623.  Elec. Coll.:
        A10648600.
  
            Handle your expense account the easy way with JOURNAL.COM.
        (Utilities)(includes related articles on customization procedures and
        decimal addition used in JOURNAL.COM) (Column) (tutorial) Michael
        Mefford. PC Magazine, Feb 12, 1991 v10 n3 p337(9).  Mag. Coll.:
        58F2758.  Bus. Coll.: 56S2332.  Elec. Coll.: A9805509.
  
            Utilities: PCSPOOL lets you get back to work while you print.
        (column)(includes related articles on changing PCSPOOL's hotkey,
        interrupt 17 calls added by PCSPOOL and PC utilities updates)
        (tutorial) Michael Holmes and Bob Flanders. PC Magazine, Jan 15, 1991
        v10 n1 p419(9).  Mag. Coll.: 58B2916.  Bus. Coll.: 55V3193.  Elec.
        Coll.: .A9754625.
  
            The new generation of Windows displays. (users of Windows 3.0 need
        highly functional monitors) (column) Jim Seymour. PC Magazine, Dec 25,
        1990 v9 n22 p87(2).  Mag. Coll.: 58B2114.  Bus. Coll.: 55R2420. Elec.
        Coll.: .A9670739.
  
            Finding your files in Windows 3.0 with WINWHERE. (file-finding
        utility program) (includes related article on accessing PC MagNet)
        (Utilities) (Column) (tutorial) Mark Adler. PC Magazine, Dec 25, 1990
        v9 n22 p397(6).  Mag. Coll.: 58B2396.  Bus. Coll.: 55R2708.  Elec.
        Coll.: .A9714901.
  
            The PIMs you already own. (personal information management
        features in utility programs) (tutorial) Donald P. Willmott. PC
        Magazine, Nov 27, 1990 v9 n20 p408(2).  Mag. Coll.: 57G2871.  Bus.
        Coll.: .54X3559.  Elec. Coll.: A9624027.
  
            Sorting it out: PCSORT.COM outdoes DOS's SORT.EXE. (utility
        program that provides sort filter)(includes related articles on sort
        algorithms, customization) (tutorial) Michael J. Mefford. PC Magazine,
        Nov 27, 1990 v9 n20 p455(9).  Mag. Coll.: 57G2914.  Bus. Coll.:
        54X3605.  Elec. Coll.: A9624243.
  
            The intelligent Windows desktop: making Program Manager work for
        you. (tutorial) Craig Stinson. PC Magazine, Sept 11, 1990 v9 n15
        p208(1).  Mag. Coll.: 56F2679.  Bus. Coll.: 52W4665.  Elec. Coll.:
        A8772858.
  
            Utilities; Trim the branches of your directory trees with
        PRUNE.COM. (includes related articles on upgrades, customizing PRUNE
        and PRUNE Command) (tutorial) Michael J. Mefford. PC Magazine, June
        26, 1990 v9 n12 p361(23).  Mag. Coll.: 55H2872.  Bus. Coll.: 51U4537.
        Elec. Coll.: .A8538464.
  
            COMPUTE.COM: the command-line calculator. (calculator
        program)(Utilities - column) (tutorial) Michael J. Mefford. PC
        Magazine, May 29, 1990 v9 n10 p363(9).  Mag. Coll.: 55E2872.  Bus.
        Coll.: .51P4908.  Elec. Coll.: A8436468.
  
            Download utilities the easy way with PCACCESS. (a communications
        program for accessing PC MagNet)(includes related articles on adding
        features to PCACCESS and PC Utilities by modem)(Utilities) (column)
        Ethan Winer and Jay Munro. PC Magazine, April 10, 1990 v9 n7 p293(11).
        Mag. Coll.: .54K2540.  Bus. Coll.: 50P5842.  Elec. Coll.: A8265726.
  
            Track your time and appointments with SCHEDULE.COM. (includes
        related articles on customizing SCHEDULE and SCHEDULE command)
        (column) Michael J. Mefford. PC Magazine, March 27, 1990 v9 n6
        p303(7).  Mag. Coll.: 54B1666.  Bus. Coll.: 49Y3612.  Elec. Coll.:
        A8208872.
  
            Add music, color, and power to your batch files with Batchman.
        (includes related article on Batchman by modem.) (tutorial) Michael J.
        Mefford. PC Magazine, Jan 30, 1990 v9 n2 p283(8).  Mag. Coll.:
        53C2030.  Bus. Coll.: 48Y5006.  Elec. Coll.: A8019028.
  
            Bill Machrone. (column) Bill Machrone. PC Magazine, Jan 16, 1990
        v9 n1 p67(2).  Mag. Coll.: 52K2742.  Bus. Coll.: 48T4881.  Elec.
        Coll.: .A7947820.
  
            Create colorful, interactive menus for your applications. (sample
        utility program) Ron Q. Smith. PC Magazine, Oct 31, 1989 v8 n18
        p319(9).  Mag. Coll.: 51L1002.  Bus. Coll.: 47Q4873.  Elec. Coll.:
        A7714712.
  
            Converting your DOS programs into 80386 protected-mode code.
        (Power Programming.) (column) Ray Duncan. PC Magazine, Oct 31, 1989 v8
        n18 p345(9).  Mag. Coll.: 51L1026.  Bus. Coll.: 47Q4897.  Elec. Coll.:
        .A7715120.
  
            Utilities. (DIRMATCH) Michael J. Mefford. PC Magazine, Sept 26,
        1989 v8 n16 p323(16).  Mag. Coll.: 51F1570.  Bus. Coll.: 46X5221.
        Elec. Coll.: .A7591104.
  
            Utilities. (type-in program for configuring OS/2) Ray Duncan. PC
        Magazine, Sept 12, 1989 v8 n15 p243(12).  Mag. Coll.: 51A1550.  Bus.
        Coll.: .46S4176.  Elec. Coll.: A7511804.
  
            Utilities. (the use of CONVERT for translating escape sequences
        and setup strings in printers, modems, or EGA monitors) Michael J.
        Mefford. PC Magazine, July 1989 v8 n13 p319(8).  Mag. Coll.: 50E1936.
        Bus. Coll.: .45T4821.  Elec. Coll.: A7343232.
  
            Slice oversize files down to floppy size. (Utilities ) Bob
        Flanders and Michael Holmes. PC Magazine, May 16, 1989 v8 n9 p279(9).
        Mag. Coll.: .49F2066.  Bus. Coll.: 44S4640.  Elec. Coll.: A7166832.
  
            Landscape mode to the rescue. (type-in utility program) Michael
        Holmes and Bob Flanders. PC Magazine, April 11, 1989 v8 n7 p257(11).
        Mag. Coll.: .49B1726.  Bus. Coll.: 43Y4237.  Elec. Coll.: A7104656.
  
            Mickey: $20 utility adds mouse speed control. (First Looks)
        (Metroplex Digital Corp.) Edward Mendelson. PC Magazine, March 14,
        1989 v8 n5 p48(1).  Mag. Coll.: 48J2031.  Bus. Coll.: 43R3520. Elec.
        Coll.: .A7325993.
  
            Multitasking with a 286. Winn L. Rosch. PC Magazine, Feb 28, 1989
        v8 n4 p120(2).  Mag. Coll.: 48F1187.  Bus. Coll.: 43N4031.  Elec.
        Coll.: .A7284439.
  
            File transfers fast and easy. (Utilities) (Column) (includes
        related articles on the null modem cable, transferring ZCOPY without
a
        diskette, speed seeking, and ZCOPY data block contents) (technical)
        Bob Flanders. PC Magazine, Feb 28, 1989 v8 n4 p251(21).  Mag. Coll.:
        48F1316.  Bus. Coll.: 43N4160.  Elec. Coll.: A7286143.
  

   IV.  The remaining 456 articles from Infotrac from 1985 to the
            present with tag "Utilities" but not "Utility Program"

       Rescue the Files You Need; Wipe Out Those You Don't - Did you hit
       Delete when you meant Save? You have more options than you
       think.(Technology Information)  Neil J. Rubenking.
       PC Magazine, Jan 2, 2001 p107.  Elec. Coll.: A67546517.
       Abstract:  A primer on file storage and file recovery is presented. To
       understand how deleted files are recovered, it is important to
       understand how files are stored on disk. The three file systems
       commonly used under Windows platforms are FAT (file allocation table),
       FAT32 (32-bit file allocation table) and NTfs (NT File System). Under
       the FAT file system, every disk is divided into fixed-size clusters.
       The FAT32 file system is almost the same, but clusters are smaller.
       NTFS is a substantially more advanced file system. Its master file
       table (MFT) is a full-blown database that indexes every file on the
       disk.

       Utilities.(Product Support)  Neil J Rubenking.
       PC Magazine (UK), Jan 2001 v10 i1 p170.  Elec. Coll.: A69653525.

       Manage Your Passwords - Keep track of passwords without compromising
       security.(Product Information)  Neil Randall.
       PC Magazine, Dec 19, 2000 p101.  Elec. Coll.: A67205961.
       Abstract:  Password management utilities have proliferated with the
       growth of the Internet and, as Web users log on to more and more
       password-protected sites, have become almost indispensable tools.
       These tools work, for the most part, by collecting your usernames and
       passwords, along with associated documents and Web sites, and then
       protecting the whole bundle with an encrypted master password.
       Whenever you need a password, you start the management program (which
       stays in memory and is accessible from Windows' icon tray), enter the
       master password, and click on the username/password combination for
       that document or site.

       Home PCs: Help Yourself - In looking at ten home PCs, we found that
       many in this year's lines are equipped with software utilities and
       Web- based support tools that make them easier to set right when
       something goes wrong.(Buyers Guide)  Bill Howard.
       PC Magazine, Dec 19, 2000 p177.  Elec. Coll.: A67205989.
       Abstract:  Home PCs are now being sold with more options for support,
       including preinstalled utilities that help buyers diagnose and solve
       problems. These preinstalled utilities also connect users with online
       support technicians who can browse the user's PC remotely and download
       fixes.

       How to Print from a PDA - With PDA-to-PC transfers and third-party IR
       applications, your documents are more portable than ever.(Product
       Information)  Bruce Brown and Marge Brown.
       PC Magazine, Dec 5, 2000 p123.  Elec. Coll.: A66683219.
       Abstract:  There are several ways to make hardcopies of information
       stored on your personal digital assistant. Data can be transferred to
       a PC using synchronization tools. Also, utilities allow PDA files to
       transfer to infrared-capable printers.

       Utilities.(Product Support)  Ignacio Alvarez.
       PC Magazine (UK), Dec 2000 v9 i12 p188.  Elec. Coll.: A66762049.

       Utilities.(ScreenSeize)(Product Support)  Charles Petzold.
       PC Magazine (UK), Oct 2000 v9 i10 p188.  Elec. Coll.: A66107529.

       Utilities.(Technology Tutorial)(Tutorial)  Steven E Sipe.
       PC Magazine (UK), Sept 2000 v9 i9 p196.  Elec. Coll.: A65539082.

       Utilities.(Technology Information)  Neil J Rubenking.
       PC Magazine (UK), August 2000 v9 i8 p208.  Elec. Coll.: A64974846.

       Utilities.(Product Support)  Neil J Rubenking.
       PC Magazine (UK), July 2000 v9 i7 p195.  Elec. Coll.: A64339745.

       Utilities.(Product Support)  Neil J. Rubenking.
       PC Magazine (UK), June 2000 v9 i6 p192.  Elec. Coll.: A62925309.

       Forward Thinking.(Industry Trend or Event)(Column)  Michael J. Miller.
       PC Magazine, May 9, 2000 p7.  Mag. Coll.: 102E1434.  Bus. Coll.:
       125X2474.  Elec. Coll.: A61241635.
       Abstract:  Utility programs are no longer a luxury. Companies need a
       variety of utilities, ranging from e-mail filters and disk
       defragmenters to zip utilities, browser add-ons and antivirus
       programs. Amazon.com's patent for `one'click shopping' and the
       company's aggressive suit against Barnes & Noble could be a serious
       threat to electronic commerce. Amazon.com recently received another
       patent, one on affiliate shopping programs that provide a commission
       to Web sites with links for purchasing items. Priceline.com received a
       patent on its reverse auctions. The concept of patents for business
       processes is new and was introduced in 1998.

       Online Utility Services.(Company Business and Marketing)  Jay Munro.
       PC Magazine, May 9, 2000 p156.  Mag. Coll.: 102E1553.  Bus. Coll.:
       125X2623.  Elec. Coll.: A61241708.
       Abstract:  New Web-based services intended to ultimately replace
       packaged utility programs are reviewed. McAfee Clinic costs $29.95 per
       year and offers such extensive features as anti-virus scanning, a
       rescue-disk creator, uninstall and cleanup utilities, and a software
       update finder. Norton Web Services is similarly priced and includes
       Live Update Pro checks for updates to programs installed on the hard
       drive, but is dangerously buggy. The Vital Check feature is based on
       Norton AntiVirus and Norton Disk Doctor.

       Grappling with Gigabytes: Disk Utilities.(News Briefs)  Greg Alwang.
       PC Magazine, May 9, 2000 p204.  Mag. Coll.: 102E1625.  Bus. Coll.:
       125X2665.  Elec. Coll.: A61241739.

       How We Tested: Disk Utilities.(News Briefs)  Greg Alwang.
       PC Magazine, May 9, 2000 p204.  Mag. Coll.: 102E1625.  Bus. Coll.:
       125X2671.  Elec. Coll.: A61241750.

       Utilities.(Product Information)  Mark Sweeney.
       PC Magazine (UK), May 2000 v9 i5 p228.  Elec. Coll.: A63133277.

       Utilities.(Product Support)  Patrick Philippot.
       PC Magazine (UK), April 2000 v9 i4 p201.  Elec. Coll.: A63133092.

       Manage Web Page Printing - Tame Web page printing using your browser,
       Office applications, and some handy utilities.(Product Support) Bruce
       Brown and Marge Brown.
       PC Magazine, March 7, 2000 p115.  Mag. Coll.: 101M2388.  Bus. Coll.:
       121Q2404.  Elec. Coll.: A59244824.

       Rescue Your System: An emergency start-up disk is vital for recovering
       from system crashes, but it can't help if you don't have it.(Product
       Support)  Neil Randall.
       PC Magazine, Feb 8, 2000 p113.  Bus. Coll.: 120U1646.  Elec. Coll.:
       A58408282.
       Abstract:  It is important to have emergency start-up disk (ESD)
       created during installation of Microsoft Windows 98 OS easily
       accessible. If an ESD was not created at that time it is important to
       create it. ESD's main function is to reboot the computer if loading
       Windows 98 becomes impossible. The utilities and files in ESD are
       discussed.

       Utilities.(News Briefs)  Mark Sweeney.
       PC Magazine (UK), Feb 2000 v9 i2 p196.  Elec. Coll.: A63500955.

       Corporate Managed PCs: Centralized management utilities, product-line
       consistency, and easily serviced chassis separate these PCs from the
       pack.(Technology Information)  Cade Metz.
       PC Magazine, Jan 18, 2000 p103.  Mag. Coll.: 101B2357.  Elec. Coll.:
       A58266419.

       Software: Adobe Acroba.(Brief Article)(Product Announcement)
       PC Magazine, Jan 4, 2000 p101.  Mag. Coll.: 101B2107.  Bus. Coll.:
       120Y2033.  Elec. Coll.: A57902710.

       PC Magazine's Technical Excellence Awards: Utilities.(Product
       Information)  Michael J. Miller.
       PC Magazine, Dec 14, 1999 p101.  Mag. Coll.: 100L1675.  Bus. Coll.:
       120N2116.  Elec. Coll.: A57761634.
       Abstract:  Utility products receiving Technical Excellence awards are
       discussed. Network ICE Corp's BlackICE Defender is a powerful
       Web-security tool that monitors any system on a network and
       automatically closes down ports if it detects an intruder. It provides
       considerable personal control and is designed for end users rather
       than global use. Setup is exceptionally easy, and the product is
       indispensable in small and home offices with full-time Internet
       connections but no firewall. WildFile's GoBack 2.1 backup tool can
       rescue a system even when Windows refuses to boot by running beneath
       the OS and tracking disk activity on a time basis. The program can
       restore or roll back a system to any working state and restore whole
       disks or individual files, displaying all recoverable file versions.
       Brightmail wins an award for its anti-spam filtering software and
       service combination.

       Second Looks.(Product Information)  Mark Child.
       PC Magazine (UK), Dec 1999 v8 i12 p98.  Elec. Coll.: A63501391.

       Utilities.(Product Support)  Patrick Philippot.
       PC Magazine (UK), Dec 1999 v8 i12 p214.  Elec. Coll.: A63501437.

       Keep Your Disk Together.(Diskeeper for Windows NT 5.0 from Executive
       Software Inc)(Product Announcement)  Jeremy A. Moskowitz.
       PC Magazine, Nov 16, 1999 p68.  Bus. Coll.: 119U3695.  Elec. Coll.:
       A56917908.

       File utilities.(shareware)(Buyers Guide)
       PC Magazine (UK), Nov 1999 v8 i11 p96.  Elec. Coll.: A63501219.

       Internet utilities.(Buyers Guide)
       PC Magazine (UK), Nov 1999 v8 i11 p119.  Elec. Coll.: A63501227.

       Linux utilities.(Product Information)  CRAIG PATERSON.
       PC Magazine (UK), Nov 1999 v8 i11 p142.  Elec. Coll.: A63501235.

       Utilities.(Technology Information)  Ignacio Alvarez.
       PC Magazine (UK), Nov 1999 v8 i11 p231.  Elec. Coll.: A63501290.

       Utilities.(Product Support)  Mark Sweeney.
       PC Magazine (UK), Oct 1999 v8 i10 p222.  Elec. Coll.: A63501130.

       Utilities.(Product Support)  Neil J Rubenking.
       PC Magazine (UK), Sept 1999 v8 i9 p190.  Elec. Coll.: A63536910.

       The Not-So-Managed PC.(network management and systems management
       utilities software)(Product Information)  Rich Fisco.
       PC Magazine, June 22, 1999 p29.  Elec. Coll.: A54703946.

       Linux 2.2 Gives NT a Run for Its Money--for Free.(Product Information)
       .Neil Randall.
       PC Magazine, June 8, 1999 p247(1).  Mag. Coll.: 99C1266.  Bus. Coll.:
       116S2658.  Elec. Coll.: A54594139.
       Abstract:  Linux, the POSIX-compliant Unix operating system, now out
       in Version 2.2--a significant new update. The latest version of the
       free Linux OS offers a feature-rich version of Unix that runs on
       platforms ranging from 386s to SPARCstations, gives you superb
       Internet tools, including the extremely popular Apache Web server, and
       runs an increasing collection of applications and utilities, many of
       which are downloadable free from the Web. Linux makes Unix even more
       central to the Net, because it runs on PCs and thus could vastly
       increase Unix's presence. The 2.2 kernel offers a number of
       improvements over earlier versions. First and foremost, its
       cross-platform support is far more extensive.

       Dissecting Diagnostics Packages.(disk/file diagnostic/maintenance
       software)(Buyers Guide)
       PC Magazine, May 4, 1999 p146(1).  Mag. Coll.: 98D2677.  Bus. Coll.:
       115V3043.  Elec. Coll.: A54299444.

       Disk Utilities: Dice & DuPe Drives.(News Briefs)  John Morris.
       PC Magazine, May 4, 1999 p173(1).  Mag. Coll.: 98D2702.  Bus. Coll.:
       115V3068.  Elec. Coll.: A54299463.

       Disk Utilities: Performance Tests.  Russ Iwanchuk.
       PC Magazine, May 4, 1999 p174(1).  Mag. Coll.: 98D2703.  Bus. Coll.:
       115V3069.  Elec. Coll.: A54299466.

       Windows NT Utilities: Essential NT Utilities.(Buyers Guide)(Brief
       Article)  Jeremy Moskowitz.
       PC Magazine, May 4, 1999 p179(1).  Mag. Coll.: 98D2708.  Bus. Coll.:
       115V3074.  Elec. Coll.: A54299477.

       Click It Automatically. (AutoAct).(Utilities)(Product
       Information)(Column)
       PC Magazine, May 4, 1999 p217(1).  Mag. Coll.: 98D2748.  Bus. Coll.:
       115V3112.  Elec. Coll.: A54299492.

       Utilitize Your Web Portal.(Network Associates' McAfee PC Clinic portal
       offers virus protection, system troubleshooting )(Company Business and
       Marketing)  Josh Taylor.
       PC Magazine, March 23, 1999 p65(1).  Elec. Coll.: A53947436.
       Abstract:  Network Associates has launched the McAfee PC Clinic, a
       smart portal that gives users protection against viruses and
       troubleshoots their networks at the same time, all for $5.95 per
       month, $49.95 per year. McAfee PC Clinic lets users access McAfee
       utilities, such as VirusScan and QuickClean, directly from the Web via
       ActiveX controls. The McAfee PC Clinic also features PC Advisor, a
       troubleshooting utility, and Virus Information Library.

           System Utilities.(Buyers Guide) PC Magazine, Jan 19, 1999 p100(1).
       Mag. Coll.: .97D1537.  Bus. Coll.: 113W3624.  Elec. Coll.: A53482031.
 
           Hard Disk Troubles.(Technology Information)(Abstract) PC Magazine,
       Dec 15, 1998 p229(1).  Mag. Coll.: 96L2614.  Bus. Coll.: 113P4788.
       Elec. Coll.: .A53218106.
 
           A Powerful Four-Pack.(Norton SystemWorks 1.0 bundles four popular
       utilities)(Product Announcement) Barry Simon. PC Magazine, Nov 1998
       v17 n19 p76(1).  Elec. Coll.: A21209548.
 
           Mind Your Manners.(Internet utilities) (Internet/Web/Online
       Service Information)(Column) Bill Machrone. PC Magazine, Oct 20, 1998
       v17 n18 p85(1).  Bus. Coll.: 111Z3043.  Elec. Coll.: A21205942.
 
           Utilities.(HandsDown downloading tool)(Product
       Information)(Column) Steven E Sipe. PC Magazine (UK), Oct 1998
       p210(1).  Elec. Coll.: A53199574.
 
           More useful utilities for you to download.(News Briefs) PC
       Magazine (UK), Oct 1998 p213(1).  Elec. Coll.: A53199575.
 
           Explorer Notes 2.0: Make a Note of It!(file management utility)
       (PC Tech: Utilities) (Product Support)(Column)(Tutorial) Neil J.
       Rubenking. PC Magazine, Sept 1, 1998 v17 n15 p269(4).  Mag. Coll.:
       95B2588.  Bus. Coll.: 110X3617.  Elec. Coll.: A21041818.
 
           Utilities.(using the Freedom of Association utility in Microsoft
       Windows) (Technology Tutorial)(Brief Article) Neil J. Rubenking. PC
       Magazine (UK), Sept 1998 n9 p217(1).
           More useful utilities for you to download. (News Briefs) PC
       Magazine (UK), Sept 1998 n9 p220(1).
           Primed for Windows 98.(Network Associates' Nuts & Bolts 98,
       Symantec's Norton Utilities 3.0 and CyberMedia's Oil Change 97 and
       First Aid 97 disk/file utilities are updated for Windows 98)(Product
       Announcement) Matthew Graven. PC Magazine, August 1998 v17 n14 p36(1).
       Mag. Coll.: .94L2343.  Bus. Coll.: 110S3052.  Elec. Coll.: A20924603.
 
           Utilities: With MultiRen you can rename more than one file at a
       time from within Windows Explorer. We explain how it works and how it
       was created. (Product Information) Gregory A Wolking. PC Magazine (UK)
       August 1998 n8 p246(1).  Elec. Coll.: A21195953.
 
           The Best of Both Worlds.(V Communications' System Commander
       Special Edition for Windows 98 and Syncronys's UpgradeAid 98 utilities
       for migrating to Windows 98 without abandoning Windows 95)(Product
       Announcement) Matthew Graven. PC Magazine, August 1998 v17 n14 p36(1).
       Mag. Coll.: .94L2343.  Bus. Coll.: 110S3052.  Elec. Coll.: A20924604.
 
           Using That Web Research.(Insight Development's Hot Off the Web
       facilitates Web research) (Product Information)(Column) Jim Seymour.
       PC Magazine, August 1998 v17 n14 p93(2).  Mag. Coll.: 94L2412.  Bus.
       Coll.: .110S3123.  Elec. Coll.: A20924634.
 
           New utilities in Windows 98. (Product Information) PC Magazine
       (UK), July 1998 n7 p48(1).  Elec. Coll.: A21195692.
 
           Utilities.(FontViewer freeware program)(Product Announcement) Jake
       Richter. PC Magazine (UK), July 1998 n7 p244(1).  Elec. Coll.:
       A21195793.
 
           Personalize Your Start Menu with DecoMenu.(for Windows 95 and 98)
       (PC Tech Utilities) (Product Support)(Column)(Tutorial) Neil J.
       Rubenking. PC Magazine, July 1998 v17 n14 p313(5).  Mag. Coll.:
       94G1420.  Bus. Coll.: 110P3816.  Elec. Coll.: A20813320.
 
           Optimum Performance.(Sterling Strategic Solutions' SOS Pro,
       PoweerQuest's Guardian Angel, American Systems' TidyDisk 2.0,
       Symantec's Norton Mobile Essentials systems management
       utilities)(Product Announcement) PC Magazine, June 30, 1998 v17 n12
       p36(1).  Mag. Coll.: 94D2407.  Bus. Coll.: 110Z4659.  Elec. Coll.:
       A20631115.
 
           Popular Utility Fixes.(Second Looks) (Product Information) Brett
       Krasnove. PC Magazine, June 30, 1998 v17 n12 p79(1).  Mag. Coll.:
       94D2462.  Bus. Coll.: 110Z4713.  Elec. Coll.: A20631142.
 
           What You Need to Know About Windows 98.(guide to Microsoft
       operating system) (Product Support)(Tutorial) Edward Mendelson. PC
       Magazine, June 30, 1998 v17 n12 p100(4).  Mag. Coll.: 94D2483.  Bus.
       Coll.: .110Z4733.  Elec. Coll.: A20631148.
 
           Avoid the DOS Prompt!(the MultiRen utility that adds Multiple
       Rename to Windows Explorer for renaming several files with a single
       command) (PC Tech Utilities) (Product Information) Gregory A. Wolking.
       PC Magazine, June 9, 1998 v17 n11 p269(4).  Mag. Coll.: 94C2684. Bus.
       Coll.: .109Q4408.  Elec. Coll.: A20636249.
 
           Utilities: Dupeless is a space-saving utility that allows you to
       find duplicate files on your hard disk using various criteria and
       group them for immediate or future deletion.(shareware) (Product
       Information) Neil J Rubenking. PC Magazine (UK), June 1998 n6 p229(1).
       Elec. Coll.: .A21271136.
 
           More useful utilities for you to download.(Directory) Mark Child.
       PC Magazine (UK), June 1998 n6 p232(1).  Elec. Coll.: A21271137.
 
           FontViewer Shows All.(Utilities) (Product Information)(Column)
       Jake Richter. PC Magazine, May 26, 1998 v17 n10 p261(1).  Mag. Coll.:
       94L2230.  Bus. Coll.: 109R3281.  Elec. Coll.: A20652653.
 
           Test Your Own Monitor.(Sonera Technologies DisplayMate video
       utilities)(Product Announcement) PC Magazine, May 15, 1998 v17 p15(1).
       Elec. Coll.: .A20611809.
 
           The Power of Choice.(deregulation of electric utilities) (Industry
       Trend or Event) PC Magazine, May 5, 1998 v17 n9 p258(1).  Bus. Coll.:
       112S4593.  Elec. Coll.: A20501968.
 
           One-Stop Shopping.(Mijenix's PowerDesk Utilities 98)(Brief
       Article)(Product Announcement) Melissa J. Perenson. PC Magazine, April
       21, 1998 v17 n8 p36(1).  Mag. Coll.: 95A2093.  Bus. Coll.: 110T3958.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20479862.
 
           Create and Solve Word-Ladder Puzzles; PC Ladder creates word games
       that challenge your vocabulary and ingenuity.(PCTech: Utilities)
       (Technology Tutorial)(Column)(Tutorial) Neil J. Rubenking. PC Magazine
       April 21, 1998 v17 n8 p227(3).  Mag. Coll.: 95A2276.  Bus. Coll.:
       110T4147.  Elec. Coll.: A20479896.
 
           Necessity, mother of utility. (software utilities) (Technology
       Information)(Editorial) Michael J. Miller. PC Magazine, March 24, 1998
       v17 n6 p4(1).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2213.  Elec. Coll.: A20404114.
 
           Utility hits and misses. (testing software utilities) (Inside PC
       Labs) (Technology Information) Diane Jecker. PC Magazine, March 24,
       1998 v17 n6 p29(1).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2238.  Elec. Coll.: A20404128.
 
           The Swiss Army knife of graphics programs. (CorelDraw utilities
       and ancillary programs) (Product Information)(Brief Article) PC
       Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p60(2).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2269.  Elec.
       Coll.: .A20404151.
 
           The 1998 Utility Guide: for our annual roundup of desktop
       utilities, we tested 225 products to find the best tools to help you
       get the most out of your PC. (includes related "Complete 1998 Utility
       Guide" listing)(Buyers Guide)(Cover Story) John Morris. PC Magazine,
       March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p100(7).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2309.  Elec. Coll.:
       A20404165.
 
           Protect your files: the Internet is a great place to catch a
       virus. Don't worry, though; these 11 antivirus utilities will protect
       your system.(Antivirus Utilities) (The 1998 Utility Guide) (Technology
       Information) Will Fastie. PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p109(9).
       Mag. Coll.: .96A2318.  Elec. Coll.: A20404168.
 
           File compression. (reviews of seven disk/file compression software
       packages)(Miscellaneous Utilities) (The 1998 Utility Guide) Douglas
       Giles. PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p164(1).  Mag. Coll.:
       96A2373.  Elec. Coll.: A20404219.
 
           Monitor a child's access.(Internet Parental Filtering Utilities)
       (The 1998 Utility Guide) (Technology Information) Kathryn Munro. PC
       Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p185(2).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2394. Elec.
       Coll.: .A20404235.
 
           OS/2 Utilities: make the most of your OS/2 system. With these
       handy products, you'll work faster and smarter.(The 1998 Utility
       Guide)(Buyers Guide) Brian Proffit. PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6
       p221(3).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2430.  Elec. Coll.: A20404274.
 
           Windows NT: build even more power into Microsoft Windows NT with
       these productivity-enhancing solutions. (Windows NT utilities)(The
       1998 Utility Guide)(Buyers Guide) Brian Proffit. PC Magazine, March
       24, 1998 v17 n6 p223(2).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2432.  Elec. Coll.:
       A20404275.
 
           DOS AND Windows 3.x: whether you work in DOS or in a DOS box,
       these utilities can help you accomplish your goals. (utility
       programs)(The 1998 Utility Guide)(Buyers Guide) M. David Stone. PC
       Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p224(1).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2433. Elec.
       Coll.: .A20404276.
 
           Read on-screen documents with ease. (Scroller window scrolling
       utility)(PCTech Utilities) (Product Information) Gregory A. Wolking.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p259(4).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2468.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404291.
 
           Return to sender. (America Online's Mail Controls, Omron Advanced
       Systems' MailJail) (E-Mail Utilities) (Product Information)(Brief
       Article) Doug Beizer. PC Magazine, March 10, 1998 v17 n5 p40(1). Mag.
       Coll.: .94M1729.  Bus. Coll.: 109Y4593.  Elec. Coll.: A20314232.
 
           Whither Windows 98? (From the Editor-in-Chief) (Product
       Development)(Editorial) Michael J. Miller. PC Magazine, Feb 10, 1998
       v17 n3 p4(1).  Mag. Coll.: 92D1879.  Bus. Coll.: 106Q4084.  Elec.
       Coll.: .A20165641.
 
       System Utilities.(Buyers Guide)
       PC Magazine, Jan 19, 1999 p100(1).  Mag. Coll.: 97D1537.  Bus. Coll.:
       113W3624.  Elec. Coll.: A53482031.

       Hard Disk Troubles.(Technology Information)(Abstract)
       PC Magazine, Dec 15, 1998 p229(1).  Mag. Coll.: 96L2614.  Bus. Coll.:
       113P4788.  Elec. Coll.: A53218106.
       Abstract:  Hard disk failures are one of the biggest concerns of PC
       users, since a disk crash can create problems in terms of lost files
       and missing information. To record and retrieve data, the hard disk
       assembly contains read/write heads. These heads are attached to
       mechanical arms which contain built-in intelligence which enables R/W
       heads to access exact data points on the disk. During a planned
       spin-down, the actuator guides the R/W heads to a dedicated spot
       called the landing zone (LZ). If the head lands in the wrong place, a
       so-called head crash can damage or destroy data. The best protective
       measure against such losses is to back-up data, programs and the
       operating system itself. Further, a number of disk/file utility
       software is available. Disk utilities such as ScanDisk isolate bad
       sectors, and prevent the system from writing to them.

       A Powerful Four-Pack.(Norton SystemWorks 1.0 bundles four popular
       utilities)(Product Announcement)  Barry Simon.
       PC Magazine, Nov 1998 v17 n19 p76(1).  Elec. Coll.: A21209548.

       Mind Your Manners.(Internet utilities) (Internet/Web/Online Service
       Information)(Column)  Bill Machrone.
       PC Magazine, Oct 20, 1998 v17 n18 p85(1).  Bus. Coll.: 111Z3043.
       Elec. Coll.: .A21205942.

       Utilities.(HandsDown downloading tool)(Product Information)(Column)
       Steven E Sipe.
       PC Magazine (UK), Oct 1998 p210(1).  Elec. Coll.: A53199574.

       More useful utilities for you to download.(News Briefs)
       PC Magazine (UK), Oct 1998 p213(1).  Elec. Coll.: A53199575.

       Explorer Notes 2.0: Make a Note of It!(file management utility) (PC
       Tech: Utilities) (Product Support)(Column)(Tutorial)  Neil J.
       Rubenking.
       PC Magazine, Sept 1, 1998 v17 n15 p269(4).  Mag. Coll.: 95B2588. Bus.
       Coll.: .110X3617.  Elec. Coll.: A21041818.

       Utilities.(using the Freedom of Association utility in Microsoft
       Windows) (Technology Tutorial)(Brief Article)  Neil J. Rubenking.
       PC Magazine (UK), Sept 1998 n9 p217(1).
       More useful utilities for you to download. (News Briefs)
       PC Magazine (UK), Sept 1998 n9 p220(1).
       Primed for Windows 98.(Network Associates' Nuts & Bolts 98, Symantec's
       Norton Utilities 3.0 and CyberMedia's Oil Change 97 and First Aid 97
       disk/file utilities are updated for Windows 98)(Product Announcement)
       .Matthew Graven.
       PC Magazine, August 1998 v17 n14 p36(1).  Mag. Coll.: 94L2343.  Bus.
       Coll.: .110S3052.  Elec. Coll.: A20924603.

       Utilities: With MultiRen you can rename more than one file at a time
       from within Windows Explorer. We explain how it works and how it was
       created. (Product Information)  Gregory A Wolking.
       PC Magazine (UK), August 1998 n8 p246(1).  Elec. Coll.: A21195953.

       The Best of Both Worlds.(V Communications' System Commander Special
       Edition for Windows 98 and Syncronys's UpgradeAid 98 utilities for
       migrating to Windows 98 without abandoning Windows 95)(Product
       Announcement)  Matthew Graven.
       PC Magazine, August 1998 v17 n14 p36(1).  Mag. Coll.: 94L2343.  Bus.
       Coll.: .110S3052.  Elec. Coll.: A20924604.

       Using That Web Research.(Insight Development's Hot Off the Web
       facilitates Web research) (Product Information)(Column)  Jim Seymour.
       PC Magazine, August 1998 v17 n14 p93(2).  Mag. Coll.: 94L2412.  Bus.
       Coll.: .110S3123.  Elec. Coll.: A20924634.

       New utilities in Windows 98. (Product Information)
       PC Magazine (UK), July 1998 n7 p48(1).  Elec. Coll.: A21195692.

       Utilities.(FontViewer freeware program)(Product Announcement)  Jake
       Richter.
       PC Magazine (UK), July 1998 n7 p244(1).  Elec. Coll.: A21195793.

       Personalize Your Start Menu with DecoMenu.(for Windows 95 and 98) (PC
       Tech Utilities) (Product Support)(Column)(Tutorial)  Neil J.
       Rubenking.
       PC Magazine, July 1998 v17 n14 p313(5).  Mag. Coll.: 94G1420.  Bus.
       Coll.: .110P3816.  Elec. Coll.: A20813320.
       Abstract:  The DecoMenu utility decorates the 'Start' menu in Windows
       95 and Windows 98. Its Introduction page shows the active operating
       system and its version, as well as the values in the system registry
       for the icon size and number of colors. The Questions page is used to
       collect the information required to install or uninstall new 'Start'
       menu icons and to preview the changes. It asks seven yes-no questions,
       after which the Confirmation page shows a simulation of the 'Start'
       menu based on the answers. Icons cannot be loaded when the file
       containing an icon is missing or corrupted, or when a bitmap has been
       used in place of an icon. How to overcome this problem is described. A
       main 'Start' menu icon or a standard shell icon can be changed simply
       by writing the icon location to the registry.

       Optimum Performance.(Sterling Strategic Solutions' SOS Pro,
       PoweerQuest's Guardian Angel, American Systems' TidyDisk 2.0,
       Symantec's Norton Mobile Essentials systems management
       utilities)(Product Announcement)
       PC Magazine, June 30, 1998 v17 n12 p36(1).  Mag. Coll.: 94D2407. Bus.
       Coll.: .110Z4659.  Elec. Coll.: A20631115.

       Popular Utility Fixes.(Second Looks) (Product Information)  Brett
       Krasnove.
       PC Magazine, June 30, 1998 v17 n12 p79(1).  Mag. Coll.: 94D2462. Bus.
       Coll.: .110Z4713.  Elec. Coll.: A20631142.

       What You Need to Know About Windows 98.(guide to Microsoft operating
       system) (Product Support)(Tutorial)  Edward Mendelson.
       PC Magazine, June 30, 1998 v17 n12 p100(4).  Mag. Coll.: 94D2483.
       Bus. Coll.: .110Z4733.  Elec. Coll.: A20631148.
       Abstract:  A guide to installing and using Microsoft Windows 98 is
       presented. Windows 98 is a consumer OS and is the last major
       incarnation of its product 'style' as distinct from Windows NT;
       Microsoft plans to merge the products into an advanced version of NT
       in the future. The upgrade from Windows 95 to Windows 98 lists for
       $108 and is expected to sell for about $90 on the street. Its Active
       Desktop interface closely resembles Internet Explorer, with disk views
       and the help system appearing in HTML and browser windows. Many users
       will want to let Windows 98 convert the hard disk to its FAT32 file
       system, which packs files into smaller clusters and can save a great
       deal of wasted space on large drives. FAT32 also allows larger disk
       partitions than FAT16, but older versions of disk utilities may be
       incompatible. Windows 98 supports up to nine monitors connected to a
       single machine, new power management features for notebooks and a new
       Broadcast Architecture for PC/TV integration.

       Avoid the DOS Prompt!(the MultiRen utility that adds Multiple Rename
       to Windows Explorer for renaming several files with a single command)
       (PC Tech Utilities) (Product Information)  Gregory A. Wolking.
       PC Magazine, June 9, 1998 v17 n11 p269(4).  Mag. Coll.: 94C2684. Bus.
       Coll.: .109Q4408.  Elec. Coll.: A20636249.
       Abstract:  The MultiRen utility adds the Multiple Rename feature to
       the Windows Explorer in Windows 95 and Windows NT 4.0 to allow several
       files to be renamed with a single command. It is used by selecting two
       or more files from within Explorer, right-clicking for the context
       menu, and selecting 'Multiple Rename.' MultiRen supports special
       commands for adding sequence numbers to filenames, forcing uppercase
       or lowercase, and other features in addition to the standard wildcard
       characters. The Multiple Rename command appears only when more than
       one object is selected, all the objects selected are physical files,
       the folder in which the objects reside are not special system folders,
       and all the files selected are in the same folder (when the files
       selected are from the 'Find' command's results list.) Using the \N
       command in the base or extension templates allows sequence numbers to
       be included in the new filenames.

       Utilities: Dupeless is a space-saving utility that allows you to find
       duplicate files on your hard disk using various criteria and group
       them for immediate or future deletion.(shareware) (Product
       Information)  Neil J Rubenking.
       PC Magazine (UK), June 1998 n6 p229(1).  Elec. Coll.: A21271136.

       More useful utilities for you to download.(Directory)  Mark Child.
       PC Magazine (UK), June 1998 n6 p232(1).  Elec. Coll.: A21271137.

       FontViewer Shows All.(Utilities) (Product Information)(Column)  Jake
       Richter.
       PC Magazine, May 26, 1998 v17 n10 p261(1).  Mag. Coll.: 94L2230. Bus.
       Coll.: .109R3281.  Elec. Coll.: A20652653.
       Abstract:  FontViewer, a free utility that lets users browse all fonts
       on the system at once, is presented. The program runs under Windows 95
       and Windows NT 4.0 and is written with Visual C++ 4.0. It consists of
       three program files and displays a list of font names on the left side
       of its window and a sample of each on the right. The program separates
       fonts into bitmapped and TrueType outlines; the latter are stored as
       sets of rules and can be scaled to any size, while the former are
       optimized for a particular point size. A toolbar lets the user select
       which fonts and character sets to display. The Show Alphanumerics
       option displays only the most commonly used characters. A detailed
       technical description of the program's operation is included.
       FontViewer is a Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC) application that
       uses the Single Document Interface (SDI). It has a special
       Cview-derived class to accommodate its unique display requirements.

       Test Your Own Monitor.(Sonera Technologies DisplayMate video
       utilities)(Product Announcement)
       PC Magazine, May 15, 1998 v17 p15(1).  Elec. Coll.: A20611809.

       The Power of Choice.(deregulation of electric utilities) (Industry
       Trend or Event)
       PC Magazine, May 5, 1998 v17 n9 p258(1).  Bus. Coll.: 112S4593. Elec.
       Coll.: .A20501968.

       One-Stop Shopping.(Mijenix's PowerDesk Utilities 98)(Brief
       Article)(Product Announcement)  Melissa J. Perenson.
       PC Magazine, April 21, 1998 v17 n8 p36(1).  Mag. Coll.: 95A2093. Bus.
       Coll.: .110T3958.  Elec. Coll.: A20479862.

       Create and Solve Word-Ladder Puzzles; PC Ladder creates word games
       that challenge your vocabulary and ingenuity.(PCTech: Utilities)
       (Technology Tutorial)(Column)(Tutorial)  Neil J. Rubenking.
       PC Magazine, April 21, 1998 v17 n8 p227(3).  Mag. Coll.: 95A2276.
       Bus. Coll.: .110T4147.  Elec. Coll.: A20479896.

       Necessity, mother of utility. (software utilities) (Technology
       Information)(Editorial)  Michael J. Miller.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p4(1).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2213. Elec.
       Coll.: .A20404114.

       Utility hits and misses. (testing software utilities) (Inside PC Labs)
       (Technology Information)  Diane Jecker.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p29(1).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2238.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404128.

       The Swiss Army knife of graphics programs. (CorelDraw utilities and
       ancillary programs) (Product Information)(Brief Article)
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p60(2).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2269.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404151.

       The 1998 Utility Guide: for our annual roundup of desktop utilities,
       we tested 225 products to find the best tools to help you get the most
       out of your PC. (includes related "Complete 1998 Utility Guide"
       listing)(Buyers Guide)(Cover Story)  John Morris.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p100(7).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2309.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404165.
       Abstract:  Instead of diminishing, as might be expected because of
       improvements in PC computing, demand for utilities is continuing to
       increase. In this 1998 edition of PC Magazine's Utility Guide, 225
       desktop utilities are tested. These products serve diverse puroses,
       varying widely in their capabilities. They range from file protectors
       to access restrictors and search engines. Some products speed up
       browsing and others transmit messages quickly. Most of the products
       considered here work with Windows 95, but there is a section devoted
       to ones that work with other operating systems (OS), including IBM's
       OS/2 Warp, Microsoft's Windows NT and MS-DOS.

       Protect your files: the Internet is a great place to catch a virus.
       Don't worry, though; these 11 antivirus utilities will protect your
       system.(Antivirus Utilities) (The 1998 Utility Guide) (Technology
       Information)  Will Fastie.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p109(9).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2318.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404168.

       File compression. (reviews of seven disk/file compression software
       packages)(Miscellaneous Utilities) (The 1998 Utility Guide)  Douglas
       Giles.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p164(1).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2373.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404219.

       Monitor a child's access.(Internet Parental Filtering Utilities) (The
       1998 Utility Guide) (Technology Information)  Kathryn Munro.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p185(2).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2394.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404235.

       OS/2 Utilities: make the most of your OS/2 system. With these handy
       products, you'll work faster and smarter.(The 1998 Utility
       Guide)(Buyers Guide)  Brian Proffit.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p221(3).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2430.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404274.

       Windows NT: build even more power into Microsoft Windows NT with these
       productivity-enhancing solutions. (Windows NT utilities)(The 1998
       Utility Guide)(Buyers Guide)  Brian Proffit.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p223(2).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2432.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404275.

       DOS AND Windows 3.x: whether you work in DOS or in a DOS box, these
       utilities can help you accomplish your goals. (utility programs)(The
       1998 Utility Guide)(Buyers Guide)  M. David Stone.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p224(1).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2433.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404276.

       Read on-screen documents with ease. (Scroller window scrolling
       utility)(PCTech Utilities) (Product Information)  Gregory A. Wolking.
       PC Magazine, March 24, 1998 v17 n6 p259(4).  Mag. Coll.: 96A2468.
       Elec. Coll.: .A20404291.
       Abstract:  Scroller, a 32-bit application, runs under Windows 95 and
       Windows NT 4.0, makes it easy to read a long document on screen.
       Scroller accomplishes this by automatically scrolling the displayed
       window at a speed determined by the user. Previously, a user had to
       periodically stop reading, aim the mouse, click the scroll bar and
       locate the appropriate place in the document. Scroller overcomes this
       problem, eliminating these frequent interruptions. The utility employs
       a distinct thread to scroll, and a ClassWizard may be used to make a
       CScrollerThread class. Scroller is offered as a free download from PC
       Magazine Online, or it can be obtained through the mail. The program's
       source code, which was written in Microsoft Visual C++, is also
       available.

       Return to sender. (America Online's Mail Controls, Omron Advanced
       Systems' MailJail) (E-Mail Utilities) (Product Information)(Brief
       Article)  Doug Beizer.
       PC Magazine, March 10, 1998 v17 n5 p40(1).  Mag. Coll.: 94M1729. Bus.
       Coll.: .109Y4593.  Elec. Coll.: A20314232.

       Whither Windows 98? (From the Editor-in-Chief) (Product
       Development)(Editorial)  Michael J. Miller.
       PC Magazine, Feb 10, 1998 v17 n3 p4(1).  Mag. Coll.: 92D1879.  Bus.
       Coll.: .106Q4084.  Elec. Coll.: A20165641.
       Abstract:  Microsoft's Windows 98 operating system has many features
       that do not depend on the Internet Explorer (IE) browser, which is
       good news for Microsoft since a Federal court recently ruled that the
       company can no longer require that PC vendors include IE 4.0 with
       Windows 95. IE 4.0 is fairly well integrated with Windows 98, allowing
       files on the local hard disk or on a local network to be viewed in a
       browser window with the same appearance as a Web site. Microsoft will
       have to focus on new features in Windows 98 other than IE 4.0 to
       compel Windows 95 users to upgrade. Windows 98 will likely be more
       stable than Windows 95 and will include more drivers. It also features
       built-in support for USB peripherals, DVD drives and other devices
       that have shipped since Windows 95's introduction. The new operating
       system is faster as well, and its Tune-Up Wizard monitors and
       defragments disks and improves application performance. If Microsoft
       is blocked from including IE 4.0 in Windows 98, should it also be
       barred from including other utilities available from third parties?

       Bits and pieces. (disk defragmenters for Windows NT servers) (Multiple
       Access) (Product Support)(Column)(Tutorial)(Brief Article)  Steve
       Buehler.
       PC Magazine, Feb 10, 1998 v17 n3 p226(1).  Mag. Coll.: 92D2085. Bus.
       Coll.: .106Q4292.  Elec. Coll.: A20165710.

       THe ins and the outs. (the InOutBd utility makes it easy to determine
       which company employees are in and which are out) (PC Tech: Utilities)
       (Technology Tutorial)(Tutorial)  John Deurbrouck.
       PC Magazine, Feb 10, 1998 v17 n3 p257(4).  Mag. Coll.: 92D2116. Bus.
       Coll.: .106Q4323.  Elec. Coll.: A20165715.
       Abstract:  The InOutBd utility described makes it easy to determine
       which company employees are in and which are out, much like an
       electric in/out board. The program is a small, special-purpose Web
       server that uses a TCP/IP network and PCs running a Web browser. Using
       the utility requires that the names to appear on the in/out board be
       entered via the configuration dialog box. An image can be associated
       with each employee to be shown on the main InOutBd and on the employee
       Detail pages. Browsers connecting to the InOutBd server see a list of
       employees and their in/out status, and the 'Names starting with'
       control makes it easy to move directly to names beginning with a
       specific letter. The names in the list are hotlinks to the detail
       pages for the employees named. Employees can be listed as 'out,' 'out
       for the day,' 'out for lunch' or 'out sick.' Perhaps a more apt
       description for some managers would be 'out of his/her gourd.'

       PC service centers. (Quarterdeck TuneUp; Symantec Norton Utilities
       diagnostic utilities)(Brief Article)(Product Announcement)  Sharon
       Nash.
       PC Magazine, Jan 20, 1998 v17 n2 p36(1).  Elec. Coll.: A20167212.

       Share your bookmarks between browsers. (synchronizing Internet
       Explorer and Netscape Navigator bookmarks with the SynURLs utility)
       (PC Tech Utilities) (Internet/Web/Online Service Information)(Column)
       .Gregory A. Wolking.
       PC Magazine, Jan 6, 1998 v17 n1 p253(4).  Mag. Coll.: 92E1656.  Bus.
       Coll.: .107Y3950.  Elec. Coll.: A20080372.
       Abstract:  The SyncURLs utility synchronizes bookmarks between
       Microsoft's Internet Explorer and Netscape's Navigator Web browsers.
       The 32-bit program runs under Windows 95 or Windows NT and works by
       combining Navigator bookmarks and IE Favorites into a single library.
       The bookmarks can be rearranged and exported to one or both browsers,
       and the library can be saved to disk for moving between machines.
       Navigator and IE store bookmarks very differently: Navigator uses a
       single file named Bookmark.htm, and the bookmarks are logical objects
       created with HTML tags; whereas IE stores bookmarks as physical files
       and folders on disk with the .url extension. SyncURLs imports and
       merges all existing bookmarks automatically and displays them in a
       tree representing a 'virtual workspace.' Bookmarks and folders can be
       dragged and dropped anywhere in the list, although locked folders
       cannot be dragged, and folders cannot be dragged to their own
       children.

       Improve your image. (nine image-editing applications priced under
       $100) (includes related articles on the Editors' Choice, four
       less-expensive applications, digital scanners and printers, panoramic
       images and image-cataloging utilities)(Buyers Guide)  Sally Wiener
       Grotta and Daniel Grotta.
       PC Magazine, Dec 16, 1997 v16 n22 p178(16).  Mag. Coll.: 92B1933.
       Bus. Coll.: .107S3614.  Elec. Coll.: A20049778.
       Abstract:  Digital technology and image editing software have brought
       new dimensions to photography. Image editing features typically
       include brightness and contrast controls, red-eye reduction
       capabilities, special effects and the ability to add brush strokes and
       text. Nine image editing programs priced under $100 are compared. They
       include Adobe PhotoDeluxe, the consumer version of Adobe's
       professional-level PhotoShop. The Editor's Choice is Microsoft Picture
       It! 2.0, which is a powerful, but inexpensive, image editor. Corel
       Print House Magic and Micrografx's Windows Draw 6.0 receive honorable
       mentions for their powerful tools and large collections of projects
       and clip art.

       ExactTime for PC clocks.(PC Tech: Utilities) (Product
       Information)(Column)  Charles Petzold.
       PC Magazine, Nov 18, 1997 v16 n20 p291(4).  Mag. Coll.: 92G1632. Bus.
       Coll.: .106S2889.  Elec. Coll.: A19958185.
       Abstract:  ExactTime, a utility that automatically adjusts the PC's
       clock by calling one of two time-of-day services designed specifically
       for data use and obtaining the correct date and time. It is a
       completely new, 32-bit program that relies on the atomic clocks of the
       National Institute of Standards and Technology and US Naval
       Observatory. Users install the utility by copying is program files to
       a folder and click on a radio button to select NIST or USNO. There are
       Configure Modem and Dialing Properties buttons that let users change
       the modem settings without opening Control Panel. Pressing the DIal
       button saves the time-of-day service and selected modem in a file
       called Exacttime.ini. ExactTime reports any problems it encounters
       during an attempt to connect. A detailed technical description of the
       program's operation is presented; it calls 14 Telephony API functions
       to manage the communications port and synchronize the PC clock with
       received data.

       RoboType means less typing for you. (utility saves typing by using
       short, expandable, abbreviations to represent text) (Technology
       Tutorial)  Gregory A. Wolking.
       PC Magazine, Nov 4, 1997 v16 n19 p327(5).  Mag. Coll.: 91A2654. Bus.
       Coll.: .104R3838.  Elec. Coll.: A19909198.
       Abstract:  RoboType is a 32-bit utility that helps save typing time
       when a specific piece of text is frequently repeated. The utility
       allows the user to type short abbreviations that represent the larger
       blocks of text, which are then expanded with a few keystrokes or the
       click of a mouse into the complete version of the text. RoboType will
       add this capability to almost any application. The utility stores the
       user's abbreviations and related expansions in library files. The
       utility runs under Windows 95 and NT 4.0. It can be obtained free from
       PC Magazine, either by mail, from its Web site
       (www.pcmag.com/discuss.htm) or in the Utilities section of ZDNet's
       TIPS Forum (GO ZNT:TIPS).

       Make telephone numbers more memorable. (the Foneword/32 utility finds
       the word equivalent of telephone numbers) (includes a related article
       on programmer resources)(PC Tech: Utilities) (Technology
       Tutorial)(Tutorial)  Neil J. Rubenking.
       PC Magazine, Oct 21, 1997 v16 n18 p281(3).  Mag. Coll.: 91F2260. Bus.
       Coll.: .104W4645.  Elec. Coll.: A19840760.
       Abstract:  The Foneword/32 utility finds the word equivalents of
       telephone numbers by searching a dictionary with almost 80,000 words.
       The program is a new version of the Foneword utility created in 1993
       using Visual Basic 3. The update was written using Borland's Delphi 3,
       and it requires no support files other than the dictionary.
       Foneword/32 looks like a telephone, and users enter up to 10 digits of
       a telephone number before clicking on one of three action buttons
       below the number buttons. The first choice is 'All real words,' the
       second is 'Some real words,' and the third is 'Just letters.' The
       first returns all letters, such as 'SYNERGY,' the second returns some
       letters and some numbers, such as 'BREAK 31' or '5 BUCKS 5,' and the
       third ignores the dictionary and shows all combinations of letters for
       the number.

       One-stop utility shop. (public utilities offering Internet access and
       energy services) (Internet/Web/Online Service Information)  Carol
       Levin.
       PC Magazine, Oct 7, 1997 v16 n17 p28(1).  Mag. Coll.: 90H2601.  Bus.
       Coll.: .104T3262.  Elec. Coll.: A19765657.
       Abstract:  The Telecommunications Act of 1996 stipulated that utility
       companies could also provide telecommunications services, so some
       people may find in the near future that their electric companies also
       are offering Internet access. Most utilities entering this niche are
       working with telecommunications firms to provide packages of telecom,
       entertainment, home security and energy services. Users will benefit
       from such one-stop shopping because it will be more convenient to get
       Internet access. Customers will have to deal with only one support
       service department to meet all telecom and energy requirements. In
       addition, the bundling of services will likely mean that the services
       will carry a lower cost. High-speed Internet access will be priced at
       approximately $35 a month, which is less than the price of current
       ISDN and T1 access charges.

       The 1997 PC Magazine shareware awards. (includes related article on
       finalists) (Industry Trend or Event)  Sheryl Canter.
       PC Magazine, Sept 23, 1997 v16 n16 p219(5).  Mag. Coll.: 90G2188.
       Elec. Coll.: .A19723613.
       Abstract:  JASC's Paint Shop Pro 4.12 wins as the Program of the Year
       in the fourth annual Ziff-Davis Shareware Awards. The bitmap-editing
       program also tops the Graphics and Multimedia Tools category because
       of its broad range of tools that are easy to use. The shareware has
       emerged as standard for creating online images. The 1997 award
       evaluated 54 finalists in 11 categories, including applications;
       business; communications and networking; e-mail, news readers and
       chat; file utilities; graphics and multimedia tools; HTML editors;
       Internet utilities; programming tools; system utilities; and Web
       development tools. Paint Shop Pro 4.12's new features help in photo
       retouching and highg-end image manipulation. By using the program, the
       inability of digital cameras to do double exposure is overcome because
       Paint Shop Pro eases the task of combining digital images and provides
       more flexibility than the usual methods.

       Protection at the desktop. (overview of evaluations of Internet
       security products) (includes related articles on Web browser security
       features, and on proxy servers)(Your Personal Internet)
       (Internet/Web/Online Service Information)(Cover Story)  Scot Finnie,
       Larry Seltzer and Neil Randall.
       PC Magazine, Sept 9, 1997 v16 n15 p149(3).  Mag. Coll.: 90B2536. Bus.
       Coll.: .103V5123.  Elec. Coll.: A19682448.
       Abstract:  The Internet has introduced many new and dangerous security
       risks for PC users, not the least of which are new, more virulent
       computer viruses. Following articles evaluate Internet security
       products in three categories: personal security suites, cookie
       managers, and S/MIME e-mail clients. Included in personal security
       suites are antivirus programs, data encryption utilities, and ActiveX
       and Java filters. Web servers place text files, or cookies, on
       people's hard disks to identify them to make return visits faster, but
       they can also be used to snoop on the other sites visited. Cookie
       managers can be used to monitor and delete cookies. S/MIME is becoming
       the standard for universal e-mail encryption and is supported by both
       Microsoft and Netscape.

       Automate tasks at shutdown. (the ShutUp utility facilitates shutting
       down Windows) (PC Tech: Utilities) (Product Support)(Column)(Tutorial)
       .John Deurbrouck.
       PC Magazine, Sept 9, 1997 v16 n15 p275(4).  Mag. Coll.: 90B2660. Bus.
       Coll.: .103V5245.  Elec. Coll.: A19682462.
       Abstract:  The ShutUp utility is the omega to Windows' StartUp alpha:
       it cleans out selected history lists, ejects CDs, deletes files in the
       Temp directory, and runs specified programs prior to shutting down a
       Windows PC. The utility can also be used to schedule daily, weekly or
       monthly reminders, or to invoke a reminder at a specified date or
       time. ShutUp is added to the system tray after installing, and
       right-clicking on the ShutUp icon shows a menu with choices that
       include Shutdown, Configure, Help, About ShutUp and Exit. Choosing the
       Configure option leads to a dialog box with tabs for history lists,
       launch, reminders, miscellaneous and help. The four items in the Start
       Button group under history lists are Documents, Find Files, Find
       Computer and Run. The Launch page is used to create a folder of links
       to programs that execute on shutdown.

       IconEdit: customize your desktop; create custom icons for the
       shortcuts on your desktop. (includes related article on where to get
       files)(PC Tech: Utilities)(Product Announcement)  Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, June 24, 1997 v16 n12 p247(4).  Mag. Coll.: 93F1862.
       Bus. Coll.: .102S3946.  Elec. Coll.: A19476112.
       Abstract:  IconEdit, a free utility that lets users create and modify
       Windows 95 desktop icons and rescale them as necessary for different
       applications and screen sizes, is presented. The program eliminates
       the need to delete old icons and recreate them in Windows 95's
       Explorer. Users can change shortcut icons with a simple right-click.
       IconEdit supports 32x32 icons with 16 colors. Windows programs do not
       actually use new icons unless they are recompiled or altered with a
       resource editor. A newly created icon will be visible only on the
       Desktop, Start menu and Explorer windows. IconEdit consists of two
       files and has a toolbar with eight tools. It supports reverse colors
       as well. A detailed technical description of the program's operation
       is presented; it creates an effective illusion of zooming on an icon
       edit square.

       BigBin enhances your Recycle Bin.(PC Tech: Utilities)(includes related
       articles on what programmers should know, where to get files) (Product
       Information)  Rick Knoblaugh.
       PC Magazine, June 10, 1997 v16 n11 p253(4).  Mag. Coll.: 96C2858.
       Bus. Coll.: .112Q4467.  Elec. Coll.: A19437806.
       Abstract:  BigBin, a freeware utility that automatically routes files
       deleted from within DOS boxes to the Windows Recycle Bin, is
       presented. The program is easy to install, requiring the copying of
       only two key files, and generally uses whatever properties the user
       has set in the Recycle Bin's Properties dialog. It consists of a
       dynamically loaded virtual device driver (VxD) for low-level tapping
       into the file system and an application program that loads and directs
       the VxD and utilizes application-level services. The VxD eavesdrops
       passively on Windows activity and takes more action only when the
       BigBin executable directs it too. There are two threads in the
       program, a main thread of execution and an additional thread dedicated
       to receiving and processing callbacks. Users can obtain the program
       via the Internet or CompuServe/ZDNet online service.

       The InternetUser guide to 50 essential downloads. (World Wide
       Web)(Directory)  Karen J. Bannan.
       PC Magazine, Summer 1997 v16 nSpeiss p79(8).  Elec. Coll.: A19520454.
       Abstract:  An annotated InternetUser guide to downloadable software is
       provided. All of the programs listed are available-for-free,
       limited-trial downloads, so a user can try them before actually buying
       them. Categories include Authoring, Browsing, Communicating, Plug-ins
       and Helpers, Servers, Site Management and Utilities. Each entry
       includes a Web address and a brief description.

       Be paged by your E-mail: MailPage monitors MAPI clients for incoming
       faxes and e-mail. (includes related article on where to obtain
       files)(PC Tech: Utilities) (Product Information)(Column)  John
       McSorley.
       PC Magazine, May 27, 1997 v16 n10 p213(3).  Mag. Coll.: 95M2620. Bus.
       Coll.: .111Y3657.  Elec. Coll.: A19344826.
       Abstract:  MailPage, a freeware utility that monitors MAPI mail
       clients and alerts the user via a pager when faxes and E-mail messages
       are received, is presented. The program installs with a Setup.exe
       program that offers a default installation directory and setup files
       the user can place in a temporary directory and later delete.
       Configuring the program to operate involves choosing Properties from
       the File menu and setting pager parameters such as whether the device
       is numeric or alphanumeric, the communications port and which pager
       object to use. The Paging.Pager object is the only object
       nonprogrammers will need; programmers can select the OLE Automation
       object to page a person. There are separate, specific settings for
       alphabetical and numeric pagers. A detailed technical explanation of
       the program's operation is included.

       Change your keyboard layout: ZDKeyMap can remap or disable any of the
       standard keys. (includes related article on where to obtain files)(PC
       Tech: Utilities)(Column)(Product Announcement)  Zan Oliphant.
       PC Magazine, May 6, 1997 v16 n9 p251(4).  Elec. Coll.: A19321673.
       Abstract:  ZDKeyMap, a simple utility that adds a property page to the
       Control Panel's Keyboard applet and lets users remap or disable any
       key on a standard Windows 95 keyboard, is presented. Microsoft's own
       Key Remap utility can handle only a few keys, while ZDKeyMap can
       convert an entire keyboard to a different layout. It consists of three
       files, including a VXD, a device information file and a DLL. Keys are
       presented in logical groupings to make them easy to find, but users
       can jump to any key immediately. Extended keys are missing from the
       ZDKeyMap key list because the program handles only standard keys found
       on all PCs since the IBM XT. All extended keys use an entire sequence
       of scan codes to maintain software compatibility. A detailed technical
       description of the program's operation and the functions of each of
       its files is presented.

       Printing the screen in Windows 95; PrintNow makes the PrtSc key work
       just as it did under DOS. (includes related article on obtaining
       files)(PC Tech: Utilities) (Product Information)(Column)  Gregory A.
       Wolking.
       PC Magazine, April 22, 1997 v16 n8 p215(4).  Bus. Coll.: 102Q4564.
       Elec. Coll.: .A19253045.
       Abstract:  PrintNow, a 32-bit Windows 95 utility that lets users print
       DOS-like screen dumps with the PrtSc key. Windows normally uses PrtSc
       to capture an image of the entire desktop and Alt-PrtSc to capture an
       image of the active window, but the copies are stored only in the
       Clipboard and can be actually printed only by copying them into a
       graphics program. PrintNow runs in the background and intercepts PrtSc
       to present a standard Print dialog. Users can then select the desired
       printer settings and print the captured image. The program adds its
       icon to the system tray when launched and has a check-box and
       radio-button interface. A Screen Capture Enabled check box determines
       whether PrintNow activates automatically every time the user pressed
       PrtSc; unchecking the box temporarily disables PrintNow. Users can
       also print to a file or work with DOS applications. A detailed
       technical description of the program's operation is presented.

       OS/2, NT, & WIN 3.X Utilities(The 1997 Utility Guide)(Cover
       Story)(Buyers Guide)  Brian Proffit.
       PC Magazine, April 8, 1997 v16 n7 p251(5).  Mag. Coll.: 88M2596. Bus.
       Coll.: .101P4647.  Elec. Coll.: A19210924.
       Abstract:  A buyer's guide to 43 utilities for OS/2, Windows NT and
       Windows 3.x is presented. The products for each operating system are
       divided into categories such as disk management, data compression,
       file transfer, data compression, user-interface management, file
       management, system diagnostics, anti-virus, backup and the Internet.
       Each brief discussion gives a short description of the product and
       vendor contact information. McAfee, IBM and Dr. Solomon all make
       antivirus software for OS/2, and there are powerful systems-management
       tools available for all three operating systems. Users who have not
       yet upgraded to a 32-bit OS will find Symantec's products, inlcuding
       Norton Desktop 3.0, Norton Utilities and Norton AntiVirus 3.0, capable
       and strong. Numerous freeware and shareware tools are available that
       eliminate weaknesses in 16-bit Windows and DOS.

       FileGrab; the missing link; grab file lists from Explorer for use in
       other applications. (PC Magazine's FileGrab 32-bit file maintenance
       utility for Windows 95/NT) (includes related article on obtaining
       FileGrab on the Internet) (PC Tech: Utilities) (Product
       Information)(Column)  Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, March 4, 1997 v16 n5 p261(4).  Mag. Coll.: 90C2660. Bus.
       Coll.: .102V4083.  Elec. Coll.: A19125100.
       Abstract:  FileGrab is a 32-bit file maintenance utility for Windows
       95/NT, which allows users to use Explorer's file lists in other
       programs. The utility can be downloaded from PC Magazine Online.
       FileGrab, written in Borland's Delphi 2.0 visual programming software,
       lets users harness the power of Explorer's listing capabilities. When
       files are dropped into the FileGrab window from Explorer, users
       receive a list of filenames, rather than the files contents. This list
       can be saved to a disk, printed or copied to the Clipboard. To install
       the utility, users must copy the application files Filegrab.hlp and
       Filegrab.exe to a hard disk subdirectory and develop a shortcut for
       the utility in the Start Menu. FileGrab always displays filenames in
       details mode.

       Surf your printer. (HP Web JetAdmin, Xerox CenterWare printer
       utilities)(Trends)(Brief Article)(Product Announcement)  Jamie Bsales.
       PC Magazine, Feb 18, 1997 v16 n4 p37(1).  Mag. Coll.: 89G3062.  Bus.
       Coll.: .101Y3969.  Elec. Coll.: A19069682.

       An Rx for Norton Disk Doctor. (bug in Norton Utilities 2.0 damages
       filenames on systems that previously had OS/2 installed)(Pipeline)
       (Product Information)(Brief Article)  Don Willmott, Regina Kwon, Carol
       Levin and Sebastian Rupley.
       PC Magazine, Feb 4, 1997 v16 n3 p9(1).  Mag. Coll.: 89M2462.  Bus.
       Coll.: .101Z3448.  Elec. Coll.: A19046476.

       URL tracking made easy; ClipAid lets you snip and save the URLs you
       want to keep.(PC Tech: Utilities) (Product Information)(Brief Article)
       .Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, Feb 4, 1997 v16 n3 p253(3).  Mag. Coll.: 89M2720.  Bus.
       Coll.: .101Z3706.  Elec. Coll.: A19046546.
       Abstract:  ClipAid, a Windows 95 utility that lets users save Internet
       URLs to the Clipboard for later storage and retrieval, is presented.
       The program is easy to install, requiring the user only to copy a
       single file to a directory on the hard disk and create an icon in the
       Windows shell. It places an icon in the Taskbar that displays saved
       URLs as a list of property sheets and supports HTTP, FTP, Gopher,
       Mailto, News and Telnet addressing schemes. The history page has
       buttons that let users manage the history list, either deleting a
       selected URL or clearing the list entirely. ClipAid can insert the URL
       data type into the Microsoft Word clipboard, although Word does not do
       so directly. This unfortunately overwrites other data types; ClipAid
       lets users control automatic address insertion for this reason. A
       detailed technical description of the program's operation is
       presented. ClipAid is the first in a series of utilities to be written
       in C++.

       Recently used programs redux. (RUPL2 tool for placing Recently Used
       menu on Win95 Programs or Start menu) (includes related article on
       where to get utilities)(PC Tech: Utilities) (Product
       Information)(Column)  Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, Jan 21, 1997 v16 n2 p207(3).  Mag. Coll.: 95M2270. Bus.
       Coll.: .111Y3307.  Elec. Coll.: A19011016.
       Abstract:  A freeware utility called RUPL2 that lets users place a
       Recently Used menu on either the Start or Programs menu in Windows 95
       is presented. The program is an enhanced version of an earlier RUPL
       design that required the menu to be nested within Programs. An early
       beta of Windows 95 kept a list of the 10 or 12 most recently used
       programs in the Start menu, but the feature was removed from the final
       version and replaced with a menu of recently opened documents. RUPL
       applies the technology Microsoft eliminated in favor of its
       document-centric view. Installing the utility is a simple matter of
       copying files; the companion RUPLCFG program lets users change the
       number of program names that appear in the Recently Used menu, assign
       descriptive program names to applications, or prevent certain
       applications from appearing in the menu. RUPL2 taps the Windows
       Registry heavily; a detailed technical description is presented along
       with small pieces of source code.

       Unfinished business.(From the Editor-in-Chief) (Industry Trend or
       Event)(Editorial)  Michael J. Miller.
       PC Magazine, Jan 7, 1997 v16 n1 p4(1).  Mag. Coll.: 87C2183.  Bus.
       Coll.: .101Z3029.  Elec. Coll.: A18960652.
       Abstract:  PC technology continued to improve in 1996, with the
       Internet rapidly gaining ascendancy. Two new generations of Web
       browsers were developed in 1996, a staggering number of new sites and
       services as well as servers to host them emerged and vendors
       introduced new utilities for developing content. There is still room
       for improvement, particularly in the area of PC manageability;
       hardware conflicts, driver incompatibilities and other unforeseen
       problems make managing desktops a nightmare in many businesses.
       Computers marketed for home use are sometimes simply business PCs with
       different bundled software, but many new home PCs are designed with
       easy setup and family use in mind. They are nevertheless still too
       complicated, and plug and play does not always work. Windows 95 has a
       better user interface than Windows 3.x but is still patched together,
       and upgrading to Windows NT requires reinstalling most applications.
       OLE, Visual Basic and Java all improve application integration but
       still have a long way to go.

       Relocate without reinstalling; COA lets you change the addresses of
       32-bit Windows programs. (includes related article on where to get
       program files)(PC Tech: Utilities) (Product Information)(Column) Neil
       J. Rubenking.
       PC Magazine, Jan 7, 1997 v16 n1 p235(3).  Mag. Coll.: 87C2420.  Bus.
       Coll.: .101Z3280.  Elec. Coll.: A18960708.
       Abstract:  COA32, a 32-bit Windows version of a popular freeware
       utility called COA for changing program addresses, is presented. COA32
       let users change the drive or directory of any Windows program without
       having to reinstall it. It has been rewritten from the ground up as a
       32-bit application and has a redesigned, easier-to-use interface than
       the original COA. Installation is a simple file-copy process, and
       adding a CleanRegistry string to the command line allows a clean
       uninstall. COA32 has a new multi-page wizard interface with each page
       representing one step in the process of telling the system how and
       where to move a program. Users can set a variety of search options;
       some search keys may be ignored because of duplication, volatility or
       security issues, and the user can define keys to ignore in case of
       future problems. A detailed technical description of the program's
       operation is presented.

       All on one computer: incorporate multiple operating systems on your
       PC. (PC Tech: Operating Systems) (Technology Tutorial)(Tutorial)
       Sheryl Canter.
       PC Magazine, Dec 17, 1996 v15 n22 p223(3).  Mag. Coll.: 88J2490. Bus.
       Coll.: .100U1776.  Elec. Coll.: A18959051.
       Abstract:  Users may install several operating systems (OS) on their
       PCs simultaneously, provided they plan carefully. Users must first
       decide whether the OSes will reside in separate hard drive partitions
       or share a partition. Typically, OSes perform better if they reside on
       separate partitions. Some operating systems, such as DOS and Windows
       95, must be installed on primary partitions, but more sophisticated
       OSes may be installed in logical drives. The hard drive partitions may
       be created using the disk utilities that come with each OS. Users
       should not compress files on systems with multiple OSes, because each
       OS will have to load its own compression drives. Ideally, users should
       employ a single file system for all the OSes installed. Unix and IBM's
       OS/2 Warp OSes have special requirements, but Microsoft OSes can be
       installed with the utilities that ship with the programs. Tips on
       backing up multiple OSes are provided.

       Viewers that Microsoft forgot: ImgView adds seven graphics formats to
       Windows 95's Quick View. (includes a related article describing how to
       obtain the files) (PC Tech/Utilities) (Product
       Support)(Column)(Tutorial)  Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, Dec 3, 1996 v15 n21 p343(2).  Mag. Coll.: 88J2066. Bus.
       Coll.: .100T3896.  Elec. Coll.: A18864275.
       Abstract:  Windows 95 features built-in support for plug-in
       file-viewing components called Quick Viewers, which let users see
       inside a file even when they do not have the application that created
       it. Viewers for more than 24 file types are included in the CD-ROM
       version of Windows 95, but it does not have viewers for such popular
       image file formats as PCX and JPEG. The ImgView utility adds Quick
       View support for seven types of graphics file formats: GIF, JPEG,
       Kodak PhotoCD, PCX, PNG, TARGA and TIFF. Right-clicking on a filename
       or icon with the extension .GIF, .JPG, .PCD, .PCX, .PNG, .TGA or .TIF
       and selecting Quick View from the context menu displays the image
       contained in the file in a Quick View window. The four commands on the
       utility's Options menu are Copy to Clipboard, Status Bar, About This
       Viewer and Exit.

       Play backgammon with your PC. (computerized version of backgammon
       presented) (includes related article on guide to utilities)(PC Tech:
       Utilities) (Product Information)  Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, Nov 19, 1996 v15 n20 p237(5).  Mag. Coll.: 90C2264. Bus.
       Coll.: .102Q4192.  Elec. Coll.: A18843131.
       Abstract:  Backgammon, a freeware utility that generates an electronic
       version of the ancient game of skill and chance on a Windows PC, is
       presented. Each player has 15 stones, or colored disks, which must be
       moved between triangular designs called points and off the board to
       win the game. Installing the program involves simply copying two
       files. Users drag and drop stones in the correct order in order to
       make moves according to standard backgammon rules. A detailed
       technical description of the program's operation is presented. Users
       can play against the Computer routine, which employs step-by-step
       logic to determine its next move. A constant array uses classic
       opening moves, and the program is aware of strategies such as bearing
       off, advancing anchor, blocking and covering a blot. Sample source
       code is included.

       Hardware: briefs. (Graphic Utilities' InkLink ink-feed system, Philips
       Electronics' EasyISDN terminal adapter, Belkin Components' ParaShare
       95 parallel device and Panasonic's PanaMedia 17-inch monitor)(Product
       Announcement)
       PC Magazine, Nov 5, 1996 v15 n19 p74(1).  Mag. Coll.: 86L2007.  Bus.
       Coll.: .97W3550.  Elec. Coll.: A18791116.

       Power to the right click! (MenuEdit utility allows users to edit
       context menus in Windows 95) (includes user guide for MenuEdit) (PC
       Tech: Utilities) (Product Support)(Tutorial)  Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, Oct 22, 1996 v15 n18 p249(4).  Mag. Coll.: 85K2352. Bus.
       Coll.: .96V3084.  Elec. Coll.: A18712895.
       Abstract:  Users can use the MenuEdit menuing utility to edit the
       context menus in Windows 95. MenuEdit allows users to edit existing
       context menus of specified file types, develop context-menu commands
       for unknown file types and set the default command to be run after
       double-clicking on an icon. MenuEdit is available by mail or from PC
       Magazine Online. The utility's Menu Items for Specific File Types
       radio button activates the list box, which specifies every file type
       registered in a system. The third radio button contains Bitmap Image,
       which is located in the list box. The Open and Print actions are
       listed in the Commands list box. Open and Print are the context menu
       commands designated for bitmapped files. The MenuEdit utility allows
       users to change actions and add new menu items to a file type.
       MenuEdit is easier to navigate than the keys and subkeys within the
       Registry, as well as safer.

       BootOpt gives you start-up control: a GUI interface makes it easier to
       set Windows 95's start-up options. (includes related article on guide
       to utilities)(PC Tech/Utilities) (Technology Tutorial)(Tutorial)
       Gregory A. Wolking.
       PC Magazine, Sept 24, 1996 v15 n16 p222(6).  Mag. Coll.: 85F1865.
       Bus. Coll.: .96N3799.  Elec. Coll.: A18651424.
       Abstract:  The only way to change start-up options for Microsoft
       Windows 95 is to edit a plain-text file, Msdos.sys, and editing can be
       facilitated by making use of a GUI for MSdos.sys called BootOpt.
       BootOpt is appealing because it gives a user-friendly interface for
       part of Windows 95 that is rather obscure. BootOpt can be obtained by
       downloading it by mail or from PC Magazine Online. Users should note
       that BootOpt manages a critical system file in Windows 95 and havoc
       can result if it is utilized incorrectly. However, there are built-in
       protections, and programmers can always return to their original
       Msdos.sys file. A detailed discussion of BootOpt is presented
       including program design, details about what is included in Msdos.sys
       and problems encountered when creating BootOpt.

       Don't know HTML? These might convert you. (utilities that convert
       files to HTML for publishing on the Web)(Web Authoring)(Buyers
       Guide)(Cover Story)  Wayne Kawamoto.
       PC Magazine, Sept 10, 1996 v15 n15 p133(1).  Mag. Coll.: 89L2422.
       Bus. Coll.: .102P4131.  Elec. Coll.: A18589976.
       Abstract:  Several utilities are available for converting files from
       popular applications into HTML files for publishing on the Web.
       Corel's $119 CorelWeb.Data works with Oracle, Access, FoxPro, Lotus
       1-2-3, Paradox and dBase data. SkiSoft's Web Publisher ($495 Standard
       edition, $990 Pro single-user version) translates Excel and PowerPoint
       documents and converts .RTF files into HTML. FTP Software's $49.99
       KEYview combines a viewer and translator and works with word
       processor, spreadsheet, raster and vector format files. InfoAccess's
       $495 HTML Transit uses templates to add HTML tags to ASCII or word
       processor text. Microsoft offers free Internet Assistants for
       converting Word, Excel and PowerPoint documents into HTML. Net-Scene's
       $199 PointPlus Maker saves PowerPoint presentations in a compact file
       format for Web servers. The WordPerfect Internet Publisher add-on is
       used to edit documents in a WordPerfect window with a special HTML
       toolbar.

       The 1996 PC Magazine Shareware Awards. (includes related articles on
       the award winners, and on obtaining the programs)(PC Tech: Shareware
       Awards)(Buyers Guide)  Sheryl Canter.
       PC Magazine, Sept 10, 1996 v15 n15 p259(5).  Mag. Coll.: 89L2550.
       Bus. Coll.: .102P4257.  Elec. Coll.: A18590011.
       Abstract:  The best shareware is listed in seven categories:
       applications, business and finance, Internet, math and science,
       networking, programming tools, and utilities. My Personal Diary for
       Windows 95 from CAM Development is the best of the applications, and
       SmartDraw 95 for Windows 95 or NT from SmartDraw Software Inc is the
       choice in the business and finance category. The best shareware
       graphing program is William Hood's WPlot, and the best for networking
       is Extensions Software Corp's X-Forum3 Network Message Forum public
       discussion program for Banyan Vines and NetWare LANs. The 16-bit
       WinEdit Windows ASCII/ANSI program editor from Wilson WindowWare is
       the best of the programming tools, and Niko Mak Computing Inc's WinZip
       for Windows 95 is the winner in the utilities phylum. The Internet
       shareware award winner is Forte Technologies' Free Agent
       online/offline news reader.

       Now you're playing with PowerToys. (Microsoft's Windows 95
       enhancements) (PC Tech: Inside Windows 95) (Product Information) Paul
       Bonner.
       PC Magazine, Sept 10, 1996 v15 n15 p299(3).  Mag. Coll.: 89L2590.
       Bus. Coll.: .102P4297.  Elec. Coll.: A18590013.
       Abstract:  Microsoft's PowerToys are Windows 95 utilities that let
       users determine the way they will use the operating system. The 13
       programs are used to customize Windows 95 in ways that eliminate many
       of the operating system's 'features.' Microsoft will not offer any
       technical support for PowerToys and will not guarantee that they will
       work correctly on every system. The Tweak UI Control Panel applet
       makes it easy to change many user interface and shell properties that
       are hidden in the registry, such as to eliminate the 'Shortcut to'
       prefix on new shortcuts. Six of the utilities are shell extensions:
       Contents Menu, Explore From Here, Shortcut Target Menu, CabView, DOS
       Prompt Here, and CD AutoPlay Extender. Three are Taskbar notification
       areas: Telephony Location Selector, FlexiCD, and QuickRes. The HTML
       Printer Driver allows HTML Web pages to be 'printed' from any Windows
       application, although the resulting HTML code will likely need to be
       touched up manually. The last two PowerToys are Round Clock and
       XMouse.

       CD-ROM anywhere. (Logicraft Information Systems' FastCD Personal
       Edition CD-ROM emulation software) (Network Edition)(Brief
       Article)(Product Announcement)  Michelle Schoenung.
       PC Magazine, July 1996 v15 n13 pNE70(1).  Mag. Coll.: 88M2287.  Bus.
       Coll.: .100Y3474.  Elec. Coll.: A18418940.

       Control installations under Windows 95. (InCrtl3 application
       installation/distribution software)(includes related article on
       InCtrl3 and accessing utilities)(PC Tech: Utilities) (Product
       Support)(Tutorial)(Column)  Neil J. Rubenking.
       PC Magazine, July 1996 v15 n13 p307(5).  Mag. Coll.: 88M2072.  Bus.
       Coll.: .100Y3259.  Elec. Coll.: A18418912.
       Abstract:  The InCtrl3 application/installation distribution program
       is a 32-bit program that works specifically with Microsoft Windows 95
       ot NT, tracking the changes made by installation programs. InCtrl3
       supports the long filenames new to the Windows platform and can
       identify changes in the Windows 95 Registry. The program's interface
       resembles Microsoft's wizards, and users are led through a series of
       pages each time the application begins. Users may decide the level of
       control they have over the tracking process by choosing to skip a
       specific page in the future. In its default mode, InCtrl3 requires a
       two-step process in which it collects information from the system
       before the new program is installed and then terminates after
       generating a report of system configuration. InCtrl3 must then be
       restarted after the installation is complete. This method lets users
       employ the Win95 Add/Remove Programs applet without incurring any risk
       of losing a critical file.

       First Aid 95: potent PC therapy. (CyberMedia's Windows file utilities)
       (Product Information)(Brief Article)  Brian Nadel.
       PC Magazine, June 25, 1996 v15 n12 p73(1).  Mag. Coll.: 85A2380. Bus.
       Coll.: .94Z3838.  Elec. Coll.: A18371527.

       The searchers. (CommTech Software's PowerSearch search utilities for
       Microsoft Word and Netscape Navigator)(Brief Article)(Product
       Announcement)  Melissa J. Perenson.
       PC Magazine, June 25, 1996 v15 n12 p80(1).  Mag. Coll.: 85A2387. Bus.
       Coll.: .94Z3845.  Elec. Coll.: A18371544.

       How Windows 95 stores long filenames. (PC Tech/Tutor) (Product
       Support)(Tutorial)  Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, June 25, 1996 v15 n12 p217(3).  Mag. Coll.: 85A2550.
       Bus. Coll.: .94Z4008.  Elec. Coll.: A18371620.
       Abstract:  Windows 95's Virtual File Allocation Table (VFAT) file
       system's ability to use long filenames overcame the length limitation
       for filenames under DOS and earlier versions of Windows. Filenames in
       the earlier form (eight characters plus a three-character extension)
       are stored the same way by Windows 95 as by DOS and 16-bit versions of
       Windows, but adding long filename support to the older format required
       more than simple expansion of directory entries to hold more than 11
       characters. Windows 95 stores two names for every file and
       subdirectory: one short name visible to all applications, and one long
       name visible only to Windows 95 applications and to applications that
       have been rewritten to support long filenames. Problems with VFAT's
       method of supporting long filenames are examined.

       Quod: a new classic game for your PC. (PC Tech/Utilities)(includes a
       related article describing Quod and how to get PC Magazine utilities)
       (Technology Tutorial)(Tutorial)  Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, June 25, 1996 v15 n12 p234(4).  Mag. Coll.: 85A2567.
       Bus. Coll.: .94Z4025.  Elec. Coll.: A18371623.
       Abstract:  The Quod strategy game created by G. Keith Still has
       players try to place pieces on a grid to make a square; the squares
       can be any size and tilted in any direction. The grid measures 11 by
       11 but has the four corners missing. Each player has 20 attacking
       pieces and six blocking pieces: one attacking piece is placed on the
       board by each player on each turn; players can put any number of the
       six blocking pieces before placing their attacking piece. When both
       players run out of attacking pieces before completing a square, or
       'quod', the player with the most blocking pieces left is the winner.
       Various strategies for the game are discussed, and the mechanics of
       the game are described.

       A belt and suspenders? (products that allay the fears of network
       managers) (Multiple Access) (Product Information)(Column)  Steve
       Buehler.
       PC Magazine, June 11, 1996 v15 n11 pN26(1).  Mag. Coll.: 86G2767.
       Bus. Coll.: .97V2909.  Elec. Coll.: A18313731.
       Abstract:  Network managers know it pays to be extra careful, and they
       appreciate products that provide them with added security. HT
       Communications offers the LineSaver, which monitors a data line and
       automatically dials up a standby ISDN line when traffic fails. The
       device costs $595 per side, which puts it out of the reach of many
       network managers, but it does give them a little more peace of mind.
       American Power Conversion's PowerShield UPS is useful for ISDN lines,
       which need external power, unlike the plain old telephone system.
       LinkPro's $89 PowerSync 3.0 32-bit PC-to-PC file synchronizer allows
       file synchronization to be scheduled for times or events, such as
       Windows startup; it also lets quick-pick lists of directories and
       files be set up, which is useful when having to start from the same
       configuration repeatedly.

       Make a dash for the Web. (Starfish Software's Starfish Internet
       Utilities and Microhelp's PowerDesk version 1.1 Web access
       software)(Brief Article)(Product Announcement)  Melissa J. Perenson.
       PC Magazine, June 11, 1996 v15 n11 p73(1).  Mag. Coll.: 86G2716. Bus.
       Coll.: .97V2862.  Elec. Coll.: A18313678.

       A new way to open Windows 95 files: this shell extension creates
       multiple file associations. (includes related article on guide to
       utilities)(PC Tech: Utilities)(Column)(Product Announcement)  John
       Lam.
       PC Magazine, May 28, 1996 v15 n10 p217(6).  Mag. Coll.: 89K2408. Bus.
       Coll.: .102P3821.  Elec. Coll.: A18272607.
       Abstract:  MultiLaunch, a Windows 95 shell extension that lets users
       associate more than one application with any document file type, is
       presented. The program is distributed online in the form of a DLL and
       must be added to the Windows 95 Registry, a task performed
       automatically by the setup program. Step-by-step instructions for
       registering MultiLaunch manually with the RegEdit program are given. A
       specific Registry key defines MultiLaunch as an OLE object. Special
       application programming interfaces let MultiLaunch do its job because
       Windows 95 passes its Class ID as a parameter to the DllGetClassObject
       function. MultiLaunch uses Microsoft Foundation Classes but not the
       clumsy standard method of implementing COM interfaces; each object is
       essentially a CShellExtension object. A detailed technical description
       of how the program was written is presented as a guide to those
       creating Windows 95 shell extensions.

       Zip it up. (PKWare's PKZIP for Windows 2.0, Vertisoft Systems' Zip-IT,
       and Nico Mak Computing's WinZip 6.1 data compression software)(Brief
       Article)(Product Announcement)  Melissa J. Perenson.
       PC Magazine, May 14, 1996 v15 n9 p78(1).  Mag. Coll.: 89J2325.  Bus.
       Coll.: .102P3256.  Elec. Coll.: A18218961.

       A free checkers game for your PC. (includes related article on using
       Checkers)(PC Tech: Utilities) (Technology Tutorial)(Tutorial) Michael
       J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, May 14, 1996 v15 n9 p253(6).  Mag. Coll.: 89J2552. Bus.
       Coll.: .102P3489.  Elec. Coll.: A18219006.
       Abstract:  A downloadable Checkers game reveals that a complex game
       can be created from relatively simple programming. The game's logic
       revolves around a hierarchy of seven decision-making steps stored
       under Computer(), which are applied in relation to a database of
       possible moves. The database is divided into a Jumps array for moves
       that involve jumps, and a Moves array for moves that do not. The
       database grows as the game continues, storing an index for each
       potential move in MoveIndex. If the move involves a jump, the move is
       pointed to the Jumps array; if it does not, it is pointed to the Moves
       array. IndexCount tracks the number of indexes stored in MoveIndex. If
       MoveIndex is empty, the decision process goes to the next level of the
       hierarchy. If it holds moves, the Computer() chooses between available
       moves. The computer uses the EvaluateRisksMoved() function to
       determine risks before and after a potential move is made.

       Fight back against Boza. (antivirus software for detecting the Boza
       computer virus) (Product Information)(Brief Article)  Melissa J.
       Perenson.
       PC Magazine, April 23, 1996 v15 n8 p80(1).  Mag. Coll.: 89K1909. Bus.
       Coll.: .102N3381.  Elec. Coll.: A18204995.

       SCInvoke: screen savers on demand: control when your screen saver can
       and can't run. (includes a related article on SCInvoke and obtaining
       PC Magazine utilities)(PC Tech/Utilities) (Technology
       Information)(Column)  John Deurbrouck.
       PC Magazine, April 23, 1996 v15 n8 p215(5).  Mag. Coll.: 89K2082.
       Bus. Coll.: .102N3562.  Elec. Coll.: A18205042.
       Abstract:  Screen savers may no longer be needed to protect today's
       monitors from burn-in when left for long periods of time, but they are
       still useful in providing password security and for keeping sensitive
       information away from prying eyes. Users need a way to invoke the
       screen saver quickly, in order to change the screen when needed. The
       popular After Dark screen saver and Microsoft Windows 95 Plus!
       accomplish this by assigning screen corners as hot or cold corners.
       Placing the cursor in a hot corner immediately invokes the screen
       saver. Placing the cursor in a cold corner keeps the screen saver from
       being activated. SCInvoke, which works with all Windows screen savers,
       solves the problem with a dialog box containing a single button.
       Clicking on the button immediately invokes the screen saver, and
       activating the dialog box prevents the screen saver from starting up.
       SCInvoke can be obtained by mail from PC Magazine or by downloading it
       from PC Magazine Online.

       Palindrome and Windows NT. (Palindrome Corp's Storage Manager 4.0,
       Windows NT Edition, and Visual Storage Administrator 1.1, Enterprise
       Edition backup software)(Brief Article)(Product Announcement)  Eryn
       Brown.
       PC Magazine, April 9, 1996 v15 n7 pN37(1).  Mag. Coll.: 83D2524. Bus.
       Coll.: .92Y2280.  Elec. Coll.: A18132678.

       Clip-media shortcuts. (products for importing content into multimedia
       applications) (Product Information)(Brief Article)  Arie Moller.
       PC Magazine, April 9, 1996 v15 n7 p170(8).  Mag. Coll.: 83D2595. Bus.
       Coll.: .92Y2359.  Elec. Coll.: A18132635.

       A Bitmap Photo Album: PicAlbum finds and organizes all the bitmaps on
       your hard disk. (PC Tech/Utilities) (includes a related article
       describing the PicAlbum utility) (Technology Tutorial)(Tutorial)
       Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, April 9, 1996 v15 n7 p267(5).  Mag. Coll.: 83D2688. Bus.
       Coll.: .92Y2452.  Elec. Coll.: A18132651.
       Abstract:  The PicAlbum utility finds bitmap files scattered around a
       hard disk, displays them, and lets them be organized into picture
       albums. PicAlbum supports .BMP, .DIB, .PCX, .GIF, TIFF, and Targa
       bitmap file types; it includes two program files, an .INI file created
       automatically when the program is run, and four support files.
       ImageKnife provides a support file that lets PicAlbum display all the
       different bitmap file formats; Media Architects granted a license to
       the magazine to use ImageKnife, so anyone who wants to change
       PicAlbum's code and recompile it will have to obtain a license file by
       buying ImageKnife.

       One for the little guys. (three small utilities for DOS)(PC
       Tech/Tutor) (Technology Tutorial)(Tutorial)  Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, March 26, 1996 v15 n6 p201(2).  Mag. Coll.: 83D2246.
       Bus. Coll.: .92Y2002.  Elec. Coll.: A18106809.
       Abstract:  Three small DOS utilities are described. The DOS command
       dir >files.txt creates a directory listing and uses output redirection
       to capture a listing in a text file named Files.txt, while the command
       debug 

STRINGS.COM (now as STRINGS3.EXE)
        (this file includes a copy of the original archive V11N22.ZIP)

A COMPANION PATCH TO ENABLE THE 'FILELAST' COMMAND OF KEY-FAKE IS
ALSO AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.  THAT PATCH IS ALSO AVAIILABLE AS:

KEYFAKE.COM (now modified as KEYFAKE2.EXE)
        (this file includes a copy of the original archive VOL4N26.ZIP)
This file permits you patch KEY-FAKE V. 1 by Charles Petzold.  The
patch also allows the program to be "loaded high" under DOS.

end this author's note]
*************************************************************************
       PC Magazine utilities updates.
       PC Magazine, Dec 22, 1992 v11 n22 p378(1).  Mag. Coll.: 67B2341. Bus.
       Coll.: .68W4602.  Elec. Coll.: A13044005.
            ADDIT.COM, Version 1.1
            ANSI.COM, Version 1.3
            BAT2EXEC.COM, Version 1.5
            BCOPY, Version 1.2
            CARDFILE.COM, Version 1.1
            CHKFRAG.EXE, Version 1.7
            CONFIG.CTL, Version 3.0
            DIRMATCH.COM, Version 3.1
            EMMA.COM, Version 2.2
            EMS40.SYS, Version 1.1
            PCACCESS.EXE, Version 1.1
            RN.COM, Version 3.0
            SLICE.COM, Version 1.3
            SNIPPER.COM, Version 1.2
            ZCOPY.COM, Version 1.4
       PC Magazine DOS 5 Memory Management with Utilities. - (book reviews)
       Barry Simon.
       PC Magazine, Dec 8, 1992 v11 n21 p75(1).  Mag. Coll.: 66M2542.  Bus.
       Coll.: .68V3980.  Elec. Coll.: A12908871.

       Exploring the Win32 console API. (the 32-bit application programming
       interface for Microsoft Windows) (Power Programming)  Ray Duncan.
       PC Magazine, Nov 24, 1992 v11 n20 p459(4).  Mag. Coll.: 66K2862. Bus.
       Coll.: .68Q3983.  Elec. Coll.: A12768110.
       Abstract:  Microsoft Corp's 32-bit application programming interface
       offers many features that are not available in the 16-bit versions of
       the graphical user interface. Win32 functions differ from many
       preceding approaches in several ways. The Win32 console functions are
       device driver-based to ensure virtual access. The functions do not
       include application hooks or escape sequences. Input and output from
       the display and keyboard are integrated into a single function.
       Windows are assumed to be the basic format of the environment. The
       functions are also intended to provide access for add-in packages and
       utilities. Extensive details and a history of preceding systems are
       included.

       The good word. (analysis of the add-on software market) (Column)
       Michael J. Miller.
       PC Magazine, Oct 13, 1992 v11 n17 p85(2).  Mag. Coll.: 66B2556. Bus.
       Coll.: .67V3999.  Elec. Coll.: A12573490.
       Abstract:  The software industry is developing add-on software
       packages that can enhance the usefulness of word processing software
       packages by offering dictionaries, thesauri, grammar checkers,
       translation packages, fax options and other utilities. Computer users
       require flexibility to achieve maximum functionality. Customization of
       software allows users to create packages with every possible feature.
       Grammar checkers are already included with four word processors, while
       separate utility programs also exist. Many grammar checkers allow
       users to install the software to run from the menus of individual
       programs and from the main Microsoft Windows system menu. On-line
       dictionaries rage from the inexpensive packages to the CD-ROM-based
       versions of linguistic encyclopedias.

       DOS lives! (applications and utilities for DOS)  Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, Oct 13, 1992 v11 n17 p259(15).  Mag. Coll.: 66B2696.
       Bus. Coll.: .67V4149.  Elec. Coll.: A12658379.
       Abstract:  DOS continues to be the most widely used operating system
       in the world, and it continues to grow in popularity after more than
       10 years of use. DOS's continued success can be attributed in large
       part to its speed, modest hardware requirements, huge installed base,
       and variety of software written for it. Graphical user interface (GUI)
       proponents claim that visually oriented point-and-shoot interfaces are
       faster and easier to learn, but DOS's biggest drawback is its 640Kbyte
       memory limit for applications, despite the many work-arounds
       available. Software developers are unhappy with the bare-bones nature
       of DOS and the lack of support it provides for writing applications to
       run on various hardware configurations. DOS's simplicity is seen by
       some as a strength and by others as a weakness; the outlook for the
       operating system and for DOS-based software is examined.

       It ain't dead yet: the future of DOS. (DOS Lives! Operating Systems)
       Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, Oct 13, 1992 v11 n17 p262(1).  Mag. Coll.: 66B2699. Bus.
       Coll.: .67V4152.  Elec. Coll.: A12658383.
       Abstract:  Microsoft is in the process of beta testing MS-DOS version
       6.0, which will likely make better use of upper memory on 386- and
       486-based systems. Version 5.0 of the operating system uses a
       technique for setting up CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files to load
       programs that works well if done just right but that fails miserably
       if done wrong. Memory optimization features in DOS 6.0 will make it
       easier to load programs and device drivers high, and EMM386 will
       likely be enhanced with more flexible expanded and extended memory
       support. The new version is also expected to offer on-the-fly disk
       compression through an enhanced version of SMART-Drive that will also
       cache data from floppy disks as well as hard disks. Among the new
       operating system utilities anticipated are a new hard disk backup
       program, a hard disk defragmenter, an antivirus package, and an
       improved Undelete utility. Other enhancements to be featured in DOS
       6.0 and later versions are described.

       Task-switching utilities. (DOS Lives! Operating Systems)  Edward
       Mendelson.
       PC Magazine, Oct 13, 1992 v11 n17 p284(1).  Mag. Coll.: 66B2721. Bus.
       Coll.: .67V4174.  Elec. Coll.: A12658403.
       Abstract:  Character-mode DOS utilities that let users switch between
       open applications have been available since 1985, and current versions
       of such task-switching utilities allow users to maneuver among DOS
       programs more elegantly than Windows and OS/2. Among task-switching
       programs are Quarterdeck Office Systems' DESQView 386 and DESQview/X,
       TModel Corp's Back & Forth Professional, SoftLogic Solutions' Software
       Carousel, and WordPerfect Corp's WordPerfect Office for DOS. DESQview
       386 runs applications in resizable windows and supports preemptive
       multitasking, which blocks one application from holding up another;
       DESQview/X is slowed down by its graphics interface but is able to
       handle DOS applications in ways unsupported by Windows. Back & Forth
       Professional lets users define as many as 50 programs that run in
       separate DOS sessions, 20 of which can be open simultaneously.
       Software Carousel features a clipboard that can automatically reformat
       data copied from one application for pasting into another. The Shell
       program in WordPerfect Office for DOS may be the simplest and most
       flexible task switcher for users familiar with the WordPerfect
       keyboard setup.

       Travelling utilities. (DOS utility programs for portable and notebook
       computers)  Bill Howard.
       PC Magazine, Oct 13, 1992 v11 n17 p303(1).  Mag. Coll.: 66B2740. Bus.
       Coll.: .67V4193.  Elec. Coll.: A12658435.
       Abstract:  Utility programs for DOS-based portable and laptop computer
       users are described. Personics Corp's $99.95 Laptop UltraVision
       restores the full height of a laptop display shrinked by one-sixth
       because VGA text mode produces 400 lines of pixels rather than the
       standard 480 for VGA graphics mode. The program also offers 22 screen
       fonts. More than a dozen utilities increase the mouse cursor size in
       Microsoft Windows and leave 'vapor trails' to help users track
       movement on slow LCD panels. The magazine's free WINPRTR utility is
       one of several low-cost or free cursor utilities; commercial cursor
       programs include Fanfare Software's $49.95 Magic Cursor! and AApex
       Software Inc's $49.95 Cursorific! Abacus's $49.95 NoMouse for Windows
       program lets a keyboard double as a mouse. Also described is SkiSoft
       Publishing Corp's $129.95 Eye Relief for Laptops limited-function text
       editor that makes text characters four times larger than normal.

       Utilities and add-ins. (New & Improved)(Brief Article) (Product
       Announcement)  Emerson Andrew Torgan.
       PC Magazine, Sept 29, 1992 v11 n16 p60(1).  Mag. Coll.: 65M1957. Bus.
       Coll.: .67Q3402.  Elec. Coll.: A12527776.

       Window dressing. (customization products for Microsoft Corp.'s Windows
       graphical user interface) (Cover Story)  Barry Simon.
       PC Magazine, Sept 29, 1992 v11 n16 p167(1).  Mag. Coll.: 65M2056.
       Bus. Coll.: .67Q3501.  Elec. Coll.: A12542378.
       Abstract:  A number of products are available that enable users to
       personalize the environment of Microsoft Corp's Windows graphical user
       interface, which can result in increased productivity. Many users now
       enjoy the benefits of screen savers such as Berkeley Systems Inc's
       $49.95 After Dark 2.0, which offers many screen-saver modules,
       impressive bitmaps and supports multimedia sound. Another increasingly
       popular personalization product is Microsoft Corp's $25 8.2 Mouse
       Software package that increases the size of on-screen cursors. Users
       are also customizing Windows by choosing alternative icons, and many
       icon collections are available through shareware and other routes.
       Aristosoft Inc's $79 Wired for Sound Pro enables users to add unusual
       sound effects to any Windows activity, and the joke-telling abilities
       of Sierra On-Line Inc's $39.95 The Laffer Utilities injects a little
       humor into the day.

       Banyan, Microsoft, and Novell: server-monitoring software from the
       source. (Banyan's VINES Assistant, Microsoft LAN Manager Toolkit for
       Visual Basic, Microsoft LAN Manager Resource Kit, Novell Inc.'s
       STAT.NLM and DUMPSTAT.EXE utilities and NetWare Services Manager) M.
       Keith Thompson and Susan G Thomas.
       PC Magazine, Sept 15, 1992 v11 n15 p290(1).  Mag. Coll.: 65J2709.
       Bus. Coll.: .67N4414.  Elec. Coll.: A12465610.
       Abstract:  Network operating system developers Banyan Systems Inc,
       Microsoft Corp and Novell Inc each have their own network monitoring
       software packages. Banyan's $699 VINES Assistant provides online
       diagnostic, performance tuning and troubleshooting functions. The
       software also enables the user to set alarms and specify thresholds.
       Microsoft's $139 LAN Manager Toolkit for Visual Basic supports
       establishment of thresholds for 25 server statistics and enables users
       to set an alarm for when a threshold is exceeded. Dynamic Data
       Exchange (DDE) supports the transmission of alarms. The Microsoft LAN
       Manager Resource Kit costs $149 and features good LAN Manager
       monitoring tools. Sample code, basic utilities, notes and hints are
       also included. Novell Inc publishes NetWare Services Manager, costing
       $4,995, for monitoring NetWare 3.1 file servers. Novell also offers
       two free utilities, STAT.NLM and DUMPSTAT.EXE, available with purchase
       of the NetWare Applications Notes magazine.

       File Wizard does network file housekeeping. (Knowzall Systems Inc.'s
       File Wizard 2.1 network file management software)  Jonathan Matzkin.
       PC Magazine, Sept 15, 1992 v11 n15 p299(1).  Mag. Coll.: 65J2718.
       Bus. Coll.: .67N4423.  Elec. Coll.: A12466218.
       Abstract:  Knowzall Systems Inc.'s File Wizard 2.1 network file
       management software differs from other network monitoring software
       packages in that it does not monitor system parameters. File Wizard
       contains tools for determining disk space. A one-server version of the
       software costs $395. File Wizard is used to manage network duties
       relating to disk space analysis. Network administrators can use File
       Wizard to determine individual network users' disk-space utilization.
       The software suffers from an interface that is not as intuitive as it
       could be; often a previous menu must be displayed and a choice
       selected. Knowzall Systems' File Wizard 2.1 provides easy file
       management for networks.

       GeoWorks Pro: more than just a poor man's Windows. (GeoWorks'
       graphical user interface)(Microsoft Windows graphical user interface)
       .Robert Kendall.
       PC Magazine, Sept 15, 1992 v11 n15 p330(1).  Mag. Coll.: 65J2741.
       Bus. Coll.: .67N4446.  Elec. Coll.: A12470782.
       Abstract:  GeoWorks' $199.99 GeoWorks Pro graphical user interface is
       an economical alternative to Microsoft Corp's Windows graphical user
       interface (GUI). The graphical environment lacks a large number of
       applications supporting it because GeoWorks has not yet released a
       software development kit. GeoWorks Pro does, however, include a word
       processor, drawing facility, communications module and a variety of
       accessory utilities. Also included is Borland International Inc's
       Quattro Pro, Special Edition, for DOS. The GUI lacks a native
       database. GeoWorks Pro supports easier file management than Windows,
       but GeoWorks Pro only lets one DOS program run at a time.

       Execute programs remotely on your LAN server's CPU. (local area
       network)(central processing unit)(includes related article on
       utilities available by modem via PC MagNet) (Tutorial)  Douglas
       Boling.
       PC Magazine, Sept 15, 1992 v11 n15 p415(8).  Mag. Coll.: 65J2808.
       Bus. Coll.: .67N4513.  Elec. Coll.: A12471330.
       Abstract:  Non-Unix-based local area networks (LANs) normally do not
       allow users to run programs remotely on another microcomputer. A user
       running a program stored on a LAN's server disk must have that program
       run on his own station; the performance obtained is limited to that of
       the executing microprocessor. Performance increases can be obtained if
       an unused workstation, or a more powerful one, is used to run a
       desired program. A free utility called REDD.SYS is provided that
       supports Unix-like remote access. The Remote Executable Device Driver
       enables users to launch programs on a LAN server. The utility is easy
       to use and supports DOS-based LANs.

       Save multiple items to the clipboard with CLIPSTAC. (Microsoft
       Windows)(Utilities) (Programming)(includes related articles on
       obtaining utilities via modem, programming the clipboard and the
       CLIPSTAC application programming interface) (Tutorial)  Richard Hale
       Shaw.
       PC Magazine, August 1992 v11 n14 p468(9).  Mag. Coll.: 65E2499. Bus.
       Coll.: .66T3653.  Elec. Coll.: A12359768.
       Abstract:  The CLIPSTAC utility for the Microsoft Windows Clipboard
       allows users to create a stack of clipboard items, and save that stack
       in a file. The unaided Microsoft Windows Clipbard is notorious for
       giving users headaches since it only allows them to store one item at
       a time; if users forget what is in the clipboard, new information
       simply overwrites it. The use of CLIPSTAC is no complex task: it
       requires no particular parameters or syntax. The utility is ideal for
       storing and accessing logos and boilerplate texts that are frequently
       used. A detailed tutorial explaining how to obtain CLIPSTAC via modem,
       how to install and use the utility, and how the utility works is
       presented.

       Load Windows programs from the DOS prompt with WINSTART.
       (Utilities)(includes related articles on how to download, updates to
       earlier utilities) (Column)  Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, June 30, 1992 v11 n12 p347(8).  Mag. Coll.: 64M2428.
       Bus. Coll.: .65Z3801.  Elec. Coll.: A12215654.
       Abstract:  WINSTART, a freeware utility available from the PC MagNet
       on-line service that lets users load Microsoft Windows programs from
       the DOS prompt, is described. WINSTART comes with a companion
       terminate-and-stay resident (TSR) program, WINGO, that the user
       installs before Windows; WINSTART itself is a Windows application that
       gives WINGO access to the Windows application programming interface.
       Instructions for running the program are given. Users can include a
       switch that disables and re-enables WINGO when running the program. A
       detailed technical description of the program's operation is included.
       WINGO, unlike most TSRs, never pops up and uses simple code to monitor
       all calls to the INT 21 memory address. It reads .EXE headers from a
       header file using the pointer from offset 3Ch.

       PC MagNet. (use of ZiffNet data base's Software and Utilities Library)
       .Jim Freund.
       PC Magazine, June 16, 1992 v11 n11 p363(1).  Mag. Coll.: 64J2736.
       Bus. Coll.: .65U3266.  Elec. Coll.: A12154546.
       Abstract:  Ziff Communications Co's ZiffNet data base's Software and
       Utilities Library (SoftLib) is a single repository that consists of
       the most recent utilities. The data base contains an easy-to-use menu
       in which file searchers can search more than 5,500 files. The menu
       consists of ten commands. Download to the Latest Files allows users to
       select from the files in the most recent issues of Ziff's
       microcomputer-related publications as well as from other sources.
       Essential Software Kits are sets of free software and shareware used
       for specific tasks. Download a Utility enables users to quickly find a
       file using the file name. Other commands include Search for Utility,
       Public Brand Software Forum, Instructions for Searching, Learn about
       Shareware, Uploading Submissions, Demos Showcase and Search for
       Utility.

       Improve program launching in Windows with MC.EXE. (Master of
       Ceremonies operating system enhancement)(Microsoft Corp.'s Windows
       graphical user interface)(includes related article on downloading
       utilities and PC Magazine utilities updates) (Utilities) (Tutorial)
       Barry Simon.
       PC Magazine, June 16, 1992 v11 n11 p364(7).  Mag. Coll.: 64J2737.
       Bus. Coll.: .65U3267.  Elec. Coll.: A12154878.
       Abstract:  Users of Microsoft Corp's Windows graphical user interface
       (GUI) can enhance program launching with the Master of Ceremonies (MC)
       operating system enhancement. MC is also intended to assist users in
       implementing design in Microsoft's Visual Basic program development
       software. MC enables users to select an application from a
       pre-established group of programs and to import existing program sets
       without breaking them apart. MC lists the drive/directory/file boxes
       on the main screen so that users can find a file without much effort.
       MC enables users to improve the run command with a list of the users
       most up-to-date commands. Users are able to either recall, reissue or
       even edit the commands.

       SPRINTER adds a flexible cursor speedup to your PC.
       (terminate-and-stay-resident utility)(includes related articles on how
       to download online utilities and updating utilities) (Utilities)
       Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, May 26, 1992 v11 n10 p357(4).  Mag. Coll.: 64G2928. Bus.
       Coll.: .65Q3904.  Elec. Coll.: A12220061.
       Abstract:  SPRINTER.COM is a terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR) utility
       available on the MagNet data base that can be accessed on the
       CompuServe online information service. The utility adds a
       cursor-accelerator feature to microcomputers that was a valued feature
       on IBM 3778 mainframe computer terminals. The user selects from the
       Alt, Ctrl or Shift keys and programs one to be a hot key to speed up
       the movement of the cursor on the computer screen. The accelerator key
       is pressed in conjunction with one of the four arrow keys or with
       either the page up or page down keys. The utility provides the
       customization-rich environment of the microcomputer with another
       valued feature of the mainframe terminal.

       WEB unveils new compression method. (WEB Technologies' DataFile/8,
       DataFiles/16 compression utilities) (New & Improved)(brief article)
       (Product Announcement)  Emerson Andrew Torgan.
       PC Magazine, May 12, 1992 v11 n9 p66(1).  Mag. Coll.: 64D2541.  Bus.
       Coll.: .65P3370.  Elec. Coll.: A12075252.

       PC-to-Mac file exchange: a range of approaches. (products for
       converting files between IBM PC and Macintosh)(includes related
       articles on file formats, glossary of Macintosh terms, Apple System 7,
       AppleTalk and the OSI model)  John Rizzo.
       PC Magazine, May 12, 1992 v11 n9 p181(9).  Mag. Coll.: 64D2640. Bus.
       Coll.: .65P3474.  Elec. Coll.: A12077254.
       Abstract:  A guide to exchanging files between IBM PC-compatible and
       Apple Macintosh microcomputers is presented. Files may be converted to
       ASCII for porting, or users can run application software available on
       both platforms. Some spreadsheet and graphics file formats are also
       supported on both the PC and the Mac, and there are third-party
       file-translation programs available. There are several fundamental
       differences between the PC and Mac file formats. Some translation
       utilities truncate Mac filenames and strip out characters illegal in
       DOS filenames when converting a file from the Mac to DOS, and perform
       'extension mapping' when copying DOS files to a Mac disk. Each Mac
       file has an invisible four-letter code for the application that
       created it. ASCII transfer is the fastest translation method, but most
       formatting is lost. Microsoft's .RTF (Rich Text Format) file format is
       supported on both the PC and the Mac, but not even Microsoft itself
       implements the format consistently between different applications.
       Graphics files are the most difficult to convert. Third-party
       translators include LapLink Mac 3.0 from Traveling Software, Software
       Toolworks' Word For Word/Professional and Word for Word/Mac and
       DataViz' MacLinkPlus/PC.

       Gain with no pain? Driver and utility vendors are more than ready for
       3.1.  Lance Ulanoff.
       PC Magazine, April 28, 1992 v11 n8 p235(9).  Mag. Coll.: 64C2652.
       Bus. Coll.: .64W2543.  Elec. Coll.: A12011648.
       Abstract:  Microsoft Windows 3.1, on the surface, looks much like
       Windows 3.0. Windows 3.1 is faster and smarter than 3.0, thanks to
       streamlined code. Some of the changes have affected backward
       compatibility, especially with device drivers and Windows-specific
       utilities, thus raising the question: are current drivers type and
       memory managers compatible with Windows 3.1? Some 100 vendors were
       surveyed and it was discovered that most major VGA, printer, memory
       and font management, disk caching and utility packages are already
       compatible with the new release, though not all will fully utilize
       each new 3.1 feature. Most VGA drivers work with Windows 3.1 even
       without being upgraded, though they may not take complete advantage of
       Windows 3.1's improved capabilities.

       PC MagNet: automated access software, part 1. (access to
       CompuServe)(column) (Tutorial)  Scott McGrath.
       PC Magazine, April 28, 1992 v11 n8 p391(1).  Mag. Coll.: 64C2794.
       Bus. Coll.: .64W2683.  Elec. Coll.: A12011696.
       Abstract:  A guide to programs that automate access to the CompuServe
       information service and the ZiffNet service it hosts is presented.
       Some automated-access programs are available free of charge; all are
       priced at $100 or less. Special ZiffNet access scripts called ZiffPlus
       are available for use with the ProComm Plus communications program and
       CompuServe Information Manager (CIM) interface. All the scripts and
       programs provide basic accessories for accessing forums and other
       services; each also offers a chat mode for conferencing and terminal
       emulation. ProComm Plus users can download ZiffPlusfrom the PC MagNet
       Utilities/Tips Forum. CompuServe Information Manager is a product sold
       by CompuServe itself packaged with the subscription kit. CIM lets
       users create a list of 'favorite,' or frequently-accessed, forums and
       services and provides a windowing CUA-compliant menu-driven approach
       to navigation. Configuration is straightforward.

       WPRINT lets you print easily in Windows 3.1. (Utilities)(includes
       related articles on updates, how to download) (Column)  Philip B.
       Eskelin Jr.
       PC Magazine, April 28, 1992 v11 n8 p393(7).  Mag. Coll.: 64C2796.
       Bus. Coll.: .64W2685.  Elec. Coll.: A12011698.
       Abstract:  Autility program for Microsoft Windows 3.1 that lets users
       print bit-mapped graphics or text files in a single step is presented.
       WPRINT, available from the PC MagNet on-line service, can be executed
       from the Program Manager's File menu with a single command. WPRINT
       takes advantage of Windows 3.1's drag-and-drop functionality; a
       technical description of how the program works is presented. The File
       Manager receives special event messages when the user moves the mouse
       and checks the handle of the window at the mouse coordinates; the
       cursor changes to a special print cursor if the point is in an area
       that has been registered via a pre-defined function. WPRINT displays a
       dialog box stating that the program is printing and gives users the
       option to cancel; disables any input to the window while printing;
       gets the device context of the printer; sets the abort procedure to
       allow messages to be processed while printing; starts the printing
       session; makes all graphics calls to the printer device context for
       the current page; lets the Windows Graphics Device Interface know when
       it is finished drawing on the current page and when to begin the next
       page; repeats the previous two steps if there are multiple pages to be
       printed; and ends the printing session.

       Audio age is about to begin. (Pipeline) (Column)  Gus Venditto.
       PC Magazine, April 14, 1992 v11 n7 p30(1).  Mag. Coll.: 63M2547. Bus.
       Coll.: .64V2803.  Elec. Coll.: A11952262.
       Abstract:  Microsoft Windows 3.1 will include many new features that
       will alter the way people work with multimedia applications. The
       object linking and embedding (OLE) utility will enable users to create
       software that combines data with executable programs. True Type fonts
       are being used because they match the display and printed output.
       Windows 3.1 will also contribute to the audio age by providing a few
       simple utilities for recording and playing sound, some internal
       application program interfaces for addressing sound boards that are
       compatible with the multimedia microcomputer and the ability to
       connect sound clips with any program that uses OLE. It will be very
       easy to integrate sounds into ordinary applications using nearly any
       of the sound boards currently on the market. Windows 3.1 provides a
       Sound Recorder utility that allows a message to be recorded and
       embedded into a document in less time than it takes to type out a
       note.

       DOSCLIP.EXE: a clipboard for all seasons. (Utilities)(includes related
       articles on how to download utilities, updates to existing programs)
       (Column)  Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, April 14, 1992 v11 n7 p387(6).  Mag. Coll.: 63M2868.
       Bus. Coll.: .64V3112.  Elec. Coll.: A11952718.
       Abstract:  DOSCLIP, a DOS utility resembling the Windows clipboard
       that lets users cut and paste between blocks of data between files, is
       presented. The program, which can be downloaded free from the PC
       MagNet on-line service, installs in memory when the user types its
       name at the DOS prompt. Users can navigate through files using the
       standard cursor-movement keys to control the DOSCLIP block cursor; the
       user need only select a block and press a hot-key combination to cut
       and paste. DOSCLIP is compatible with Windows 3.0 and 3.1 but should
       be installed before Windows for maximum effectiveness. Users can
       capture data in one DOS session and paste it into another. DOSCLIP
       mimics the user's interfaces to interact with programs. A technical
       description of the program's operation is presented, along with a
       partial source-code listing.

       Michelangelo strikes: beware the 6th of March.  Tin Albano.
       PC Magazine, March 31, 1992 v11 n6 p30(2).  Mag. Coll.: 63L2605. Bus.
       Coll.: .64Q4564.  Elec. Coll.: A12013727.
       Abstract:  Microcomputer users should beware of the Michelangelo
       computer virus that is programmed to erase infected hard disk files on
       Mar 6, 1992. The virus overwrites infected hard disks with random
       characters from a computer's system memory. The Michelangelo virus is
       the second most common virus and is expected to soon overtake the
       Stoned virus as the most-reported virus in the world. Users should
       scan their hard disks with anti-virus utilities or change the date on
       the computer's clock. Computer viruses are categorized as either file
       infectors, which launch whenever a program is run; or boot-sector
       parasites, which recode the disks' boot sector to allow the virus to
       be loaded into memory.

       AttiTools Windows utilities organize your information. (Attitash
       Software Inc.'s AttiTools file management software) (New &
       Improved)(brief article) (Product Announcement)  Emerson Andrew
       Torgan.
       PC Magazine, March 31, 1992 v11 n6 p64(1).  Mag. Coll.: 63L2639. Bus.
       Coll.: .64Q4598.  Elec. Coll.: A11989773.

       Utilities: decompress your .ZIP file downloads with PCUNZIP.COM.
       (includes related articles about PC Magazine utilities updates,
       downloading utilities and PCUNZIP command) (Column)  Michael J.
       Mefford.
       PC Magazine, March 31, 1992 v11 n6 p361(6).  Mag. Coll.: 63L2890.
       Bus. Coll.: .64Q4877.  Elec. Coll.: A12013821.
       Abstract:  The free utility from each issue of PC Magazine can be
       downloaded from PC MagNet, but the source code files are usually
       compressed into .ZIP files, which must be uncompressed prior to usage.
       .ZIP files are created by running any number of files though the PKZIP
       shareware utility. PKZIP individually compresses each file and enables
       a group of compressed files to be stored in a single .ZIP file. This
       typically requires only half as much hard disk space as the
       uncompressed files. PKUNZIP.EXE can be used to uncompress the .ZIP
       files on PC MagNet. Without a copy of PKUNZIP.EXE, the free utility
       provided in this issue can be used to uncompress the .ZIP files. The
       utility is not as sophisticated as PZUNZIP.EXE, but it is smaller,
       requiring 5Kbytes as opposed to 21Kbytes. It works well and it does
       not cost a cent.

       Rid your disk of duplicate files with SHOWDUPE.EXE. (includes related
       articles on customizing SHOWDUPE and downloading utilities)
       (Utilities)(column) (Tutorial)  Richard Hale Shaw.
       PC Magazine, Feb 25, 1992 v11 n4 p355(4).  Mag. Coll.: 63E2902. Bus.
       Coll.: .63T4637.  Elec. Coll.: A11887837.
       Abstract:  Computer users who need to find and delete large quantities
       of duplicate files can use SHOWDUPE.EXE, a utility that runs on MS-DOS
       3.0 and later. The first step of the process in any file cleanup
       procedure involves creating a list of files including date, time stamp
       and size of file. More involved analysis of files can be tedious and
       time-consuming. SHOWDUPE helps find all duplicate files on multiple
       disks drives, organizes them, displays them in a list and allows users
       to view, compare and delete files. Users can specify an unlimited
       number of drives or directories on the command line and the total
       number of files SHOWDUPE can scan is limited only by the amount of
       conventional memory. The utility is written in C++ programming
       language. Extensive details are provided.

       Corrections and amplifications. (correction to 'On guard: 20 utilities
       that battle the virus threat' in Oct. 29, 1991 issue, page 199)
       (Correction Notice)
       PC Magazine, Feb 11, 1992 v11 n3 p23(1).  Mag. Coll.: 63C2588.  Bus.
       Coll.: .63T3859.  Elec. Coll.: A11733332.

       19 programs that build on AutoCAD. (Autodesk Inc.'s
       AutoCAD)(computer-aided design)(includes related article on
       display-list drivers) (discusses 19 add-on AutoCAD programs evaluated
       in 'Drawing viewers: visual file management' and 'Text editors:
       editing AutoCAD text: more than meets the eye')  David Cohn.
       PC Magazine, Feb 11, 1992 v11 n3 p259(3).  Mag. Coll.: 63C2818. Bus.
       Coll.: .63T4091.  Elec. Coll.: A11744032.
       Abstract:  Autodesk Inc's AutoCAD computer-aided design application is
       the program of choice among the many offices that use microcomputer
       design stations. AutoCAD's popularity is primarily due to allowing
       users to customize most of its features. Its AutoLISP programming
       language allows for even more customization and AutoCAD Release 11
       adds the AutoCAD Development System (ADS), allowing applications
       programmers to develop complex programs in high-level languages.
       AutoCAD has infiltrated a variety of vertical markets along with the
       more traditional engineering and architecture fields. Horizontal
       AutoCAD utilities are also available that include file managers, text
       editors, fonts and hatch patterns. These are general utilities that
       can be useful to virtually all CAD users regardless of their
       specialized field.

       Utilities: sum the numbers on your screen with ADDIT.COM.
       (Programming) (includes related articles on downloading utilities, on
       teaching ADDIT to read and on saving memory using run-length
       encoding)(column) (Tutorial)  Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, Feb 11, 1992 v11 n3 p347(6).  Mag. Coll.: 63C2898. Bus.
       Coll.: .63T4175.  Elec. Coll.: A11743768.
       Abstract:  ADDIT.COM is a small terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR)
       utility that adds up numbers and allows the user to paste the total
       either in the same file or in another. By blocking the on-screen area
       that contains the numbers that have to be added up, a user can hit the
       Plus key and the sum appears. Another keystroke will do the pasting.
       ADDIT.COM is a DOS utility requiring DOS 3.0 or later; it cannot
       capture number from Windows because it comes up only in character
       mode. ADDIT can be downloaded from PC MagNet; PC MagNet can also
       supply the source code listing, ADDIT.ASM. The source code has three
       parts: the installation routine, the TSR state-save/restore code, and
       the code that does the screen processing and addition. Instructions
       for using ADDIT are detailed.

       Lab notes: undocumented functions in Windows, part 2. (column)
       (Tutorial)  Andrew Schulman.
       PC Magazine, Feb 11, 1992 v11 n3 p355(10).  Mag. Coll.: 63C2906. Bus.
       Coll.: .63T4183.  Elec. Coll.: A11743920.
       Abstract:  In continuing the search for undocumented Windows
       applications programming interface (API) functions, the Norton Desktop
       for Windows (NDW) files are used. Exploring undocumented Windows
       functions provides the user a deeper understanding of how the program
       works and, obliquely, the attitudes of Microsoft's programmers. The
       main use of undocumented Windows functions is internal: one dynamic
       link library (DLL) exports undocumented functions for use by other
       DLLs. In NDW, among the undocumented functions are:
       Get/SetInternalWindowsPos, GlobalMasterHandle() and
       SetDeskWallPaper(). Other undocumented functions in Microsoft's shell
       programs, such as Program Manager; its Windows development tools; its
       commercial applications, such as Excel; and its languages, such as
       Visual Basic and Quick C for Windows, are discussed.

       The best of 1991. (includes related articles on products that receive
       honorable mention, products available in 1992 and problems with
       Microsoft Windows 3.0) (Cover Story)  Bill Howard, Frank J. Derfler
       Jr., Joel Dreyfuss, Mary Kathleen Flynn, Lori Grunin, Edward Mendelson
       Bill O'Brien, Charles Petzold, Alfred Poor, Jim Seymour, Richard Hale
       Shaw, Luisa Simone, Kaare Christian, Robert Kendall, Paul R. Murphy,
       Steve Rigney and Barry Simon.
       PC Magazine, Jan 14, 1992 v11 n1 p112(24).  Mag. Coll.: 62L2531. Bus.
       Coll.: .62Z4093.  Elec. Coll.: A11650496.
       Abstract:  The best products of 1991 are chosen by PC Magazine. While
       attempting to decide which products are best, the judges also debate
       whether users are better off with a computer now than they were in
       1981 without one. Their answer is a definite maybe. Winning software
       packages include Aldus PageMaker 4.0 for Windows desktop publishing
       software, The Norton Utilities from Symantec Corp, WinFax Pro
       shareware and Corel System Corp's CorelDraw. Hardware honors are
       bestowed on the HP LaserJet IIIP and HP LaserJet IIISi laser printers,
       the HP ScanJet IIc and the MultiSync FG series of monitors from NEC
       Technologies Inc, among others. Predictions for the coming year also
       are offered. Pen-based computers will enter the mainstream of the
       laptop market; the software licensing issue will heat up, with
       companies refusing to pay for each named user; and peripheral drivers
       will improve greatly. In the software category, applications that run
       under Microsoft Windows will be the big winners in 1992.

       The Norton Utilities, version 6.0. (file management software from
       Symantec Corp.) (The Best of 1991) (Cover Story)  Edward Mendelson.
       PC Magazine, Jan 14, 1992 v11 n1 p160(2).  Mag. Coll.: 62L2571. Bus.
       Coll.: .62Z4133.  Elec. Coll.: A11650630.

       Corrections and amplifications. (to 'On Guard: 20 utilities that
       battle the virus threat' in October 29, 1991 issue) (Correction
       Notice)
       PC Magazine, Jan 14, 1992 v11 n1 p23A(1).  Mag. Coll.: 62L2432. Bus.
       Coll.: .62Z4004.  Elec. Coll.: A11650486.
       PC MagNet: a guide to ZiffNet. (on-line service) (Tutorial)  Craig
       Kerwien.
       PC Magazine, Jan 14, 1992 v11 n1 p383(4).  Mag. Coll.: 62L2782. Bus.
       Coll.: .62Z4330.  Elec. Coll.: A11660080.
       Abstract:  The ZiffNet on-line service provides a variety of
       information about computer products for buyers and users. ZiffNet's
       services including buying and technical support, industry news and
       research, and product information. The Software and Utility Library
       (SOFTLIB) is a clearinghouse for utilities and shareware. ZiffNet
       interactive discussion forums allow the user to 'talk' to writers and
       editors at PC Magazine, PC/Computing, PC Week and Computer Shopper.
       New services debuting in 1992 are on-line technical support from
       computer book and newsletter publisher The Cobb Group, and a series of
       searchable databases full of product information. Databases include
       Product Reviews Index, Computer Database Plus, Select Demos On-line,
       Computer Directory and The Editors' Choice, a listing of all products
       that receive the PC Magazine Editors' Choice Award. Information on how
       to access ZiffNet is included.

       PC Magazine DOS 5 Techniques and Utilities. (brief article) - (book
       reviews)  Andrew Schulman.
       PC Magazine, Dec 31, 1991 v10 n22 p71(1).  Mag. Coll.: 62J2596. Bus.
       Coll.: .62U4288.  Elec. Coll.: A11609284.

       Pricing LAN software sensibly. (local area network) (Column)  Jim
       Seymour.
       PC Magazine, Dec 31, 1991 v10 n22 p97(2).  Mag. Coll.: 62J2622. Bus.
       Coll.: .62U4314.  Elec. Coll.: A11613180.
       Abstract:  Local area network software is unfairly priced and there
       are ways to alter the unworkable pricing policy. A three-tier decision
       model should be set up. First, is the price a flat fee, or is it
       related to the number of users? Software publishers are not paying
       attention to the concept of pricing by server. Server pricing is the
       best means of paying for smaller applications such as utilities. In
       fact, there should be several ways of paying for an application. Users
       are willing to pay fair prices, but they would prefer prices that
       reflect the actual usage of a product. Second, if charges are
       determined by the number of users, is the price dependent upon the
       maximum number of concurrent users or should there be a separate
       license for every named user? Named-user pricing is completely unfair
       and actually encourages illegal copying. It should be put to a stop.
       Finally, how is the price per user set? Is the net price at large
       sites a fair one? Vendors believe the price/number of users curve
       should be a gradual one, but it should level out somewhere in the
       hundreds. Customers believe they should get an increasingly larger
       discount the more they purchase. In practice, the price should not
       have to go too far below the 25 to 30 percent discount already
       available, no matter how many users there are. But vendors should make
       it easier to add single users instead of issuing licenses for five or
       10 users at a time.

       Farewell to (software) innocence? (software becomes more complex,
       harder for the average user to fix or customize) (Column)  William F.
       Zachmann.
       PC Magazine, Dec 31, 1991 v10 n22 p105(1).  Mag. Coll.: 62J2630. Bus.
       Coll.: .62U4322.  Elec. Coll.: A11613304.
       Abstract:  Software is becoming so complex that soon users will not be
       able to fix problems on their own. The movement toward more
       challenging software is similar to that in the automobile industry. A
       lot of people used to be able to open the hood and figure out what was
       wrong. Now, cars are run by computers, and drivers have to take their
       autos to authorized mechanics. Such a move toward complexity is
       devastating for end users because the newly sophisticated software
       often is not as good as the simpler programs of the past. The new
       software does not take care of the maintenance, tuning and repair of
       computer systems. Even the advent of automatic installation and
       maintenance capabilities in utilities makes it more difficult for
       users to poke around in the insides of the program. Granted, such
       features does make software more accessible to novice users, but it
       also creates more ways for a user to get into trouble, regardless of
       his or her level of experience. To combat the movement away from user
       involvement, vendors should provide users with a straightforward
       explanation of how to install or configure software on their own. The
       empowerment movement should begin with a good owner's manual.

       8th annual awards for technical excellence. (outstanding standards and
       operating systems, development tools, utilities, applications
       software, portable computers, printers, connectivity products, and
       computer games) (Cover Story)  Bill Machrone and Michael J. Miller.
       PC Magazine, Dec 31, 1991 v10 n22 p110(18).  Mag. Coll.: 62J2635.
       Bus. Coll.: .62U4327.  Elec. Coll.: A11614052.

       Utilities. (8th annual awards for technical excellence) (Cover Story)
       Bill Machrone and Michael J. Miller.
       PC Magazine, Dec 31, 1991 v10 n22 p126(2).  Mag. Coll.: 62J2643. Bus.
       Coll.: .62U4335.  Elec. Coll.: A11614094.

       PC Magazine utilities updates.
       PC Magazine, Dec 31, 1991 v10 n22 p368(1).  Mag. Coll.: 62J2871. Bus.
       Coll.: .62U4559.  Elec. Coll.: A11638714.
       Back up your day's work painlessly with PCTODAY and PCCOPY. (includes
       related articles on querying with IOCTL and bit shifting in
       BASIC)(input/output control) (Utilities) (Tutorial)  Ethan Winer.
       PC Magazine, Dec 17, 1991 v10 n21 p379(6).  Mag. Coll.: 62H3018. Bus.
       Coll.: .62V5010.  Elec. Coll.: A11485848.
       Abstract:  PCTODAY and PCCOPY are two backup utility programs that are
       written for use with Microsoft QuickBASIC 4.0 or later, with source
       code available from PC MagNet. PCTODAY scans a hard disk and displays
       a list of all files listed with the current date. It will also list
       all files that have been modified since a user-specified date. Users
       can invoke PCCOPY in conjunction with PCTODAY or as a standalone.
       PCCOPY takes the list presented by PCTODAY and copies the files to a
       designated destination for backup. PCCOPY used alone is similar to the
       DOS COPY command but it will copy only files that are more recent than
       any files with the same name on the target directory or drive, as well
       as those that do not exist on the target. Extensive details are
       presented on the design of PCTODAY and PCCOPY.

       The first DOS 5.0 utility: UMBFILES frees up extra RAM. (upper memory
       blocks)(Utilities) (tutorial)  Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, Nov 26, 1991 v10 n20 p497(6).  Mag. Coll.: 62E3004. Bus.
       Coll.: .62Q5102.  Elec. Coll.: A11445904.
       Abstract:  DOS-based microcomputer users lose varying amounts of RAM
       depending on the number of files they declare in their CONFIG.SYS
       statement. The UMBFILES.COM utility fixes this problem by relocating
       most of DOS's system file table (SFT) to upper memory on 80386- and
       80486-based systems that are configured for loading programs high. The
       utility works in upper memory and users execute it from the command
       line instead of the CONFIG.SYS file. Users can save from 1Kbyte of RAM
       to over 14Kbytes, depending on how many files they currently use to
       boot up their system. UMBFILES is one of the first utilities to
       utilize upper memory blocks (UMB). On some systems DOS 5.0 can make up
       to 130Kbytes of extra memory available by using the EMM386.EXE file.
       The operating system can pass the memory on to applications in the
       form of UMBs. Details on running UMBFILES.COM are presented.

       PC Magazine utilities updates.
       PC Magazine, Nov 26, 1991 v10 n20 p501(1).  Mag. Coll.: 62E3008. Bus.
       Coll.: .62Q5106.  Elec. Coll.: A11445996.

       Programming considerations for MS-DOS 5.0, part 2. (Microsoft Corp.'s
       operating system) (Power Programming)(column) (tutorial)  Ray Duncan.
       PC Magazine, Nov 12, 1991 v10 n19 p441(7).  Mag. Coll.: 62C2894. Bus.
       Coll.: .61Y4014.  Elec. Coll.: A11471670.
       Abstract:  Microsoft Corp's MS-DOS 5.0 operating system includes many
       undocumented functions that are critical to memory-resident programs.
       Because these memory-resident utilities are so prevalent and
       important, programmers would like Microsoft to maintain documentation
       for such functions. Many of the functions are described in the
       Microsoft MS-DOS Programmer's Reference. The INT 2Fh interface, also
       called the multiplex interrupt, has been used for numerous functions,
       including interapplication communications, but the most recent
       function is the Task Switcher Applications Programming Interface
       (API), which is included as part of the MS-DOS 5.0 Shell. Extensive
       details are included.

       Save your configuration changes without leaving Windows 3.0. (includes
       related articles on code within PC Magazine test, PC Magazine
       utilities updates and implementing a DLL)(column) (Utilities )
       (tutorial)  Gene Kavner.
       PC Magazine, Oct 29, 1991 v10 n18 p391(7).  Mag. Coll.: 61M2914. Bus.
       Coll.: .61V3713.  Elec. Coll.: A11407625.
       Abstract:  CFGSAVE is a Microsoft Windows 3.0 utility for saving
       changes to the Program Manager configuration. Users are ordinarily
       required to exit Windows before configuration changes are saved, but
       CFGSAVE allows all windows and applications to remain intact while the
       save takes place. CFGSAVE modifies the Program Manager menu to include
       a Save Configuration option. The utility subclasses the Program
       Manager window procedure so it can handle the Save Configuration item.
       The program manipulates the Exit Windows dialog box to make use of the
       Save Changes checkbox, and once the configuration is saved, CFGSAVE
       sends a NULL reply to the Program Manager to cancel the Exit Windows
       process. Extensive details are included.

       PC-File gets new look, integrated utilities. (version 6.0 of database
       management system from ButtonWare Inc.) (New & Improved) (product
       announcement)
       PC Magazine, Oct 15, 1991 v10 n17 p62(1).  Mag. Coll.: 61K2401. Bus.
       Coll.: .61P3697.  Elec. Coll.: A11295185.

       Putting a friendly face on data compression. (shell programs for data
       compression utilities)  Barry Simon.
       PC Magazine, Oct 15, 1991 v10 n17 p292(1).  Mag. Coll.: 61K2627. Bus.
       Coll.: .61P3927.  Elec. Coll.: A11295315.
       Abstract:  File-compression utilities usually have rather stark
       command-line interfaces. Fortunately, shell programs are available.
       The $35 ArcMaster 5.56 shareware program from New-Ware of San Diego,
       CA; $30 Shez 6.1 shareware program from Santa Rosa, CA-based
       California Software Design and $21.95 Zip Manager 3.0 shareware
       program from Moon Valley Software Inc of Phoenix, AZ, all handle .ZIP,
       .LHA and .ARC files. Users must already have either the LHA, PKZIP or
       ARC Plus file-compression utilities. Shez and ArcMaster display
       directory trees and lists of file directories. File viewers are also
       found in the Magellan 2.0 search software program from Lotus
       Development Corp.

       FFF - a single command to find multiple files on all your drives.
       (Flexible File Finder) (Utilities) (includes related articles on FFF
       under Windows, on updates of earlier PC Magazine utilities, and on the
       FFF command parameters) (tutorial)  John Deurbrouck.
       PC Magazine, Oct 15, 1991 v10 n17 p402(7).  Mag. Coll.: 61K2735. Bus.
       Coll.: .61P4035.  Elec. Coll.: A11295367.
       Abstract:  DOS 5.0, like its predecessors, has pokey tools for
       searching long-unaccessed programs or data files on a hard disk. The
       utility FFF (Flexible File Finder) is much faster. FFF examines the
       directories on all of a microcomputer's hard disks and allows a user
       to target many different file specifications at once. FFF has an
       extended wild-card syntax and provides a choice of report formats. FFF
       may be run under Microsoft Windows or in a less memory-hungry version
       under MS-DOS. A guideline used in designing FFF was that the program
       should handle DOS critical errors without user intervention. FFF may
       be downloaded from PC MagNet or by writing directly to Katherine West
       at PC Magazine.

       What you can do to overcome disk disasters, part 2. (includes related
       article on additional programming techniques) (Lab Notes) (tutorial)
       Barry Simon.
       PC Magazine, Sept 24, 1991 v10 n16 p385(6).  Mag. Coll.: 61F2924.
       Bus. Coll.: .61N5527.  Elec. Coll.: A11217337.
       Abstract:  Disk failure corrections can be effected via tools provided
       by the DOS operating system, but file management software packages
       offer safer and more complete solutions for disk disasters. DOS'
       RECOVER.COM tool helps the user to correct disk space that has been
       compromised, but entering the command RECOVER without a parameter
       prepares the system to change subdirectories into files. Those files
       will then be inaccessible. DOS' CHKDSK is a better utility for helping
       the user to cope with disk disasters. CHKDSK does not address the
       physical integrity of a disk, but does check the logical structure of
       a disk. In addition to disk management tools offered by DOS, users can
       turn to file management software packages such as Norton Utilities, PC
       Tools and The Mace Utilities.

       Utilities: HUGECALC handles humongous numbers easily and accurately.
       (includes related article on PC Magazine program upgrades) (tutorial)
       .Neil J. Rubenking.
       PC Magazine, Sept 24, 1991 v10 n16 p391(7).  Mag. Coll.: 61F2930.
       Bus. Coll.: .61N5533.  Elec. Coll.: A11217495.
       Abstract:  Most microcomputer programs cannot handle calculations that
       produce very large numbers or that involve large digits. Programming
       languages supporting integer variables are limited to handling digits
       represented by one, two, or four bytes. Other programming languages
       that support floating-point variables can handle much larger numbers,
       but the size of such numbers is limited by a fixed number.
       Rounding-off errors occur in these environments and significant errors
       can result when the cumulative effects are considered. A mathematical
       utility called HUGECALC is offered that is a command-line six-function
       calculator. The utility can handle inputs with up to 253 digits and
       results with up to 254 digits; the DOS command line allows numbers
       with only 127 characters, however.

       BASM, Turbo Pascal 6.0's built-in assembler. (Utilities)(Borland
       International Inc.'s program development software)  Neil J. Rubenking.
       PC Magazine, Sept 24, 1991 v10 n16 p394(1).  Mag. Coll.: 61F2933.
       Bus. Coll.: .61N5536.  Elec. Coll.: A11218697.
       Abstract:  Borland International Inc's Turbo Pascal 6.0 program
       development software includes a built-in assembler called BASM that is
       an implementation of the Integrated Development Environment (IDE). The
       assembler supports machine code instructions for all Intel Corp
       8088/8086, 8087, 80286 and 80287 environments. While not a
       full-fledged stand-alone assembler, BASM mostly handles ASM file
       extension instructions. BASM is used by inserting a block of assembly
       instructions into a program. The instruction is preceded by ASM and
       ended by END. Instructions can include Pascal constants, variables and
       procedures by name.

       PC MagNet News: the latest files and features of PC Magazine's on-line
       service. (includes related article on subscription instructions)
       PC Magazine, Sept 24, 1991 v10 n16 p399(1).  Mag. Coll.: 61F2938.
       Bus. Coll.: .61N5541.  Elec. Coll.: A11225533.
       Abstract:  PC Magazine's PC MagNet on-line service is holding a
       sweepstakes competition in which it is giving away one free Hayes
       Ultra Smartmodem 9600 modem each day from Aug 7 through Nov 14, 1991.
       Candidates are chosen from a pool of users who log on during a
       randomly-selected 10-minute period each day. The winner is chosen from
       a drawing that is held every night. The Hayes modem supports
       transmission speeds of 9,600 bps. A book that addresses confusion over
       laptop and notebook computers is available and includes a disk with
       many utilities and executable programs from the pages of PC Magazine.
       The book is called PC Magazine Guide to Notebook & Laptop Computers.

       Peter Norton brings all his utilities to Windows in one $149 package.
       (Symantec Corp.'s Norton Desktop for Windows)(Hot Prospect) (New &
       Improved) (product announcement)  Cristina Cordova and Nate Zelnick.
       PC Magazine, Sept 10, 1991 v10 n15 p61(1).  Mag. Coll.: 61C2406. Bus.
       Coll.: .60W2611.  Elec. Coll.: A11116355.

       Visual Basic changes everything. (Bill Machrone) (column)  Bill
       Machrone.
       PC Magazine, Sept 10, 1991 v10 n15 p81(2).  Mag. Coll.: 61C2426. Bus.
       Coll.: .60W2631.  Elec. Coll.: A11116641.
       Abstract:  Microsoft Corp's Visual Basic for the Windows graphical
       interface is a powerful programming tool for end users despite the
       fact that it is based on a language that is easy to understand, lacks
       control structures and is slow when used as an interpreter. Many
       professional programmers scoff at BASIC out of pride in their
       understanding of C and other structured languages, but Visual Basic
       makes programming accessible to more users than ever before. It is
       easier to program than Lotus 1-2-3's macro language and no harder than
       the dBASE language as well as more productive than both. Visual Basic
       should improve user acceptance of Windows by encouraging users to
       write their own applications that take advantage of the graphical
       environment. It will not make every Windows user into a programmer,
       but many applications are likely to emerge in the public-domain and
       shareware arenas as well as commercially. Many useful utilities can be
       implemented in only a few lines of Virtual Basic code. Visual Basic is
       event-driven and not object-oriented, but the lack of object
       orientation will not be a problem for most users.

       FidoNet and PCRelay: technologies for networking your BBS. (bulletin
       board systems)  Joe Salemi.
       PC Magazine, Sept 10, 1991 v10 n15 p240(2).  Mag. Coll.: 61C2593.
       Bus. Coll.: .60W2790.  Elec. Coll.: A11125411.
       Abstract:  The two main technologies available for networking bulletin
       board systems (BBSes) are FidoNet and PCRelay. FidoNet dates back to
       the early 1980s, when hobbyists and software authors wrote utilities
       for automatic sharing of files, messages and electronic mail among
       various BBSes. The original Fido BBS software was written by two
       programmers living on opposite coasts who needed an easy way to
       exchange updates. FidoNet grew on an informal basis as more BBS
       operators, both public and private, began linking their systems. The
       technology uses store-and-forward messaging and is based on
       point-to-point communications between nodes. Front-end or 'mailer'
       software acts as a transport layer between nodes. The front-end
       program answers calls and determines whether they are from a user or
       another BBS. BBS-specific utilities 'toss' and 'scan' the EchoMail
       message-sharing system. PCRelay is an alternative technology that has
       emerged over the years. It differs from FidoNet in the fact that it
       used Universal Text Interchange (UTI), a standard BBS file format, and
       uses a different topology. PCRelay identifies boards by an
       eight-letter name and ID code instead of a node number. Both PCRelay
       and FidoNet provide similar functions, but FidoNet is more widely
       supported in BBS software.

       What you can do to overcome disk disasters, part 1. (Lab Notes)
       (column)  Barry Simon.
       PC Magazine, Sept 10, 1991 v10 n15 p409(6).  Mag. Coll.: 61C2746.
       Bus. Coll.: .60W2945.  Elec. Coll.: A11123035.
       Abstract:  Norton Utilities 5.0, Mace Utilities 1990 and PC Tools
       Deluxe, the three best-known general-purpose utility packages, all
       offer a wide range of file recovery capabilities. These tools work by
       examining the logical structure of a disk and performing a low-level
       formatting process, dividing disks into addressable 512-byte sectors
       that are laid out in concentric circles called tracks. The system area
       of the disk, created during high-level formatting, consists of a boot
       sector, file allocation table and root directory. A partition boot
       sector contains a brief program that runs when the system is booted.
       The file allocation table (FAT) can occupy many sectors, and two
       copies are kept on disk. A corrupted FAT can cause a disk failure. A
       technical description of how DOS allocates file space is presented.

       WINCOLOR.EXE: maximum color control in Windows. (Microsoft Corp.'s
       Windows 3.0 graphical user interface) (Utilities column)(includes
       related article on updates) (tutorial)  Richard Hale Shaw.
       PC Magazine, August 1991 v10 n14 p411(5).  Mag. Coll.: 60M2076. Bus.
       Coll.: .60S3763.  Elec. Coll.: A11010496.
       Abstract:  WINCOLOR.EXE is an utility for Microsoft Windows that lets
       users display and set custom colors for more Windows components that
       the Control Panel supports. The Control Panel's display of color
       changes often does not adequately reflect how they will look
       on-screen, and it provides no access to the color of highlighted menu
       items, grayed menu items or push buttons. WINCOLOR is straightforward
       to use and presents a 'Work Area' for mixing colors; the color can be
       modified at any time by adjusting sliders representing red, green and
       blue. Two Selected Color boxes show pure and dithered forms of the
       currently selected color. Users can select a color from any visible
       box by clicking on it with the left mouse button and paint it into any
       box by clicking on the right mouse button. Painting a color into the
       Work Area involves only double-clicking on it. There are several
       selectable options in the System Menu box. A technical description of
       how WINCOLOR works is presented.

       PC MagNet News. (Column)  Chris Parker.
       PC Magazine, August 1991 v10 n14 p419(1).  Mag. Coll.: 60M2084. Bus.
       Coll.: .60S3771.  Elec. Coll.: A11010482.
       Abstract:  The PC MagNet on-line service offers many downloadable
       utility programs and access to product reviews. The GO REVIEWS index
       contains a searchable directory for every comprehensive product review
       published in PC Magazine since 1987. GO COMPLIB brings the user to
       Computer Library and Computer Database Plus, which contains the full
       text for every article in over 130 computer periodicals. Computer
       Directory is also part of Computer Library; it provides product and
       vendor information. System operator Ken Hipple runs the Utilities/Tips
       Forum and has considerable knowledge of databases, assembly language,
       word processing and other hardware issues.

       Why software innovation is lagging. (column)  Jim Seymour.
       PC Magazine, July 1991 v10 n13 p89(2).  Mag. Coll.: 60J2570.  Bus.
       Coll.: .59T4188.  Elec. Coll.: A10861106.
       Abstract:  Most microcomputer software vendors are emphasizing
       incremental change and refining their existing products rather than
       designing revolutionary new products. Several leaders in the software
       industry refuse to be quoted on the subject, but others say that
       innovation today is simply taking different forms than in the past.
       Innovative utilities are bundled with larger packages, concealing the
       number of new programs coming to market. VisiCalc co-author Dan
       Bricklin states that new hardware drives software innovation; he is
       now involved with the development of pen-based computers. Some argue
       that only new companies can produce ture next-generation products
       because the resources of existing firms must be balanced between
       enhancement of existing products and new product development. Many
       claim that the enormous size of the software market and the emergence
       of more sophisticated users has reduced innovation.

       Weed out your overgrown directories with FILECTRL.COM. (includes
       related article on customization)(Utilities column) (tutorial)
       Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, July 1991 v10 n13 p409(10).  Mag. Coll.: 60J2854.  Bus.
       Coll.: .59T4474.  Elec. Coll.: A10871692.
       Abstract:  FILECTRL, a utility for maintaining document files that
       displays filenames in a directory and the contents of the highlighted
       file in adjacent windows, is presented. The FILECTRL program
       simplifies the 'weeding out' of unused documents or those that should
       be backed up and deleted. It can be downloaded from the PC MagNet
       on-line service. Users execute FILECTRL by typing FILECTRL followed by
       a file specification and options at the DOS command line. Users can
       mark file for deletion and delete the currently highlighted file
       without marking it. A technical description of FILECTRL's operation is
       presented. It uses special algorithms and routines to separate control
       codes for popular word processors such as WordPerfect from the text
       itself. FILECTRL works with Microsoft Word and Q&A Write as well as
       WordPerfect.

       Track down your PATH problems with CHKPATH.COM. (utility to enhance
       the DOS PATH command) (Utilities)(column) (tutorial)  John Deurbrouck.
       PC Magazine, June 11, 1991 v10 n11 p367(5).  Mag. Coll.: 60D2882.
       Bus. Coll.: .59N3549.  Elec. Coll.: A10774254.
       Abstract:  The DOS PATH command is used to allow programs in various
       directories to be executable from other directories, but conflicts
       between executable files with the same name can arise. The CHKPATH
       utility identifies conflicts between programs and determines problems
       with the existing PATH definition. The program can be run with
       switches that produce lists of all files in the path, specify drives
       or directories, report file names without further information and
       search on specified DOS variables. Details regarding CHKPATH's use and
       methods are included.

       Briefs. (notebook microcomputers and help utilities)
       PC Magazine, May 14, 1991 v10 n9 p58(1).  Mag. Coll.: 59M2587.  Bus.
       Coll.: .58T2304.  Elec. Coll.: A10677433.

       Finding and changing to the directory you want, with CDX.COM. (change
       directory, extended)(includes related articles on compiling CDX.C,
       modified utilities available on-line and specifics on the CDX command)
       (Utilities)(column - technical) (tutorial)  Michael Holmes and Bob
       Flanders.
       PC Magazine, April 30, 1991 v10 n8 p361(5).  Mag. Coll.: 59J2836.
       Bus. Coll.: .58P2538.  Elec. Coll.: A10582152.
       Abstract:  CDX.COM, a utility for DOS that lets users quickly change
       directories without typing in long path names, is presented. The
       program uses a special variable to search a specific directory and a
       backslash character with an /F switch. Several command examples are
       presented, along with a technical description of how CDX works. The
       program first searches the current directory if it is executed from a
       subdirectory and then goes 'down' through the subdirectory structure,
       reversing to move 'up' if necessary and accepting even a single letter
       as a directory name. Special program routines direct the search on a
       particular drive, search for the target directory in and below the
       requested directory, and build new operands for when to begin looking.
       CDX.COM is available on-line from PC MagNet.

       Lotus 1-2-3 add-ins: building the perfect spreadsheet. (overview of
       four sections of evaluations of Lotus 1-2-3 add-in software)  Craig
       Stinson.
       PC Magazine, April 16, 1991 v10 n7 p101(4).  Mag. Coll.: 59F2608.
       Bus. Coll.: .57U2447.  Elec. Coll.: A10452011.
       Abstract:  Twenty-one add-in programs for the Lotus 1-2-3 2.2
       spreadsheet are reviewed. The products are divided into four
       categories: 'shortcut' packages for complex problems such as financial
       analysis; business forecasting programs, which help users assess
       risks; optimizers; and utilities tools. The popularity of add-ins is
       due to the fact that many corporations have standardized on 1-2-3 and
       do not want to abandon their investment in favor of programs which may
       integrate some of the features available in 1-2-3 add-ins. Add-ins let
       users enhance 1-2-3 in exclusive and specific ways, building on
       existing investments. Buying add-ins ad an alternative to migrating to
       a more powerful package also saves on hardware upgrade costs. Lotus
       1-2-3 2.2 can run with most add-ins on low-end microcomputers with
       640Kbytes of RAM. Many add-ins are designed to perform very specific
       functions and are aimed at vertical markets.

       Automate your program operations with ENCORE.COM. (includes related
       article on changing hotkeys)(Utilities) (tutorial)  Scott Chaney.
       PC Magazine, April 16, 1991 v10 n7 p327(6).  Mag. Coll.: 59F2810.
       Bus. Coll.: .57U2649.  Elec. Coll.: A10465114.
       Abstract:  ENCORE.COM, a utility that automates repetitive tasks by
       letting users record and play back keystrokes, is presented. Entering
       ENCORE at the DOS prompt causes the program to load itself as a small
       terminate-and-stay resident (TSR) file taking up 1Kbyte; its internal
       buffer holds up to 100 keystrokes. Several parameters are available
       which save recorded keystrokes to .ENC files, load sequences back into
       the buffer for replaying and let the user modify configuration when
       the program is initially loaded. Users can adjust a 'boost' threshold
       to determine how long a pause will be recorded between keystrokes.
       Placing ENCORE in a subdirectory on the path in use is recommended.
       ENCORE does not work in all situations; it works by reading calls to
       BIOS interrupt 9, but some programs do not wait for this interrupt to
       make sense of all keystrokes. A detailed technical description of
       ENCORE's operation is presented.

       Back to BASICs. (Bill Machrone) (column)  Bill Machrone.
       PC Magazine, March 26, 1991 v10 n6 p75(2).  Mag. Coll.: 59C2476. Bus.
       Coll.: .57P3288.  Elec. Coll.: A10420092.
       Abstract:  Writing small utility programs can be rewarding for many
       users and helps them develop and maintain coding skills. PC Magazine
       offers utilities in downloadable form on the PC MagNet on-line service
       and includes source code, which lets users determine exactly what the
       program does and make their own modifications when necessary. The
       authors of the software are also accessible on the PC MagNet
       Programming Forum, letting end users participate in what is
       essentially a class in program design and economical coding.

       Create and customize your own icons for Windows 3.0. (Utilities)
       (tutorial)  Marc Adler.
       PC Magazine, March 26, 1991 v10 n6 p345(8).  Mag. Coll.: 59C2728.
       Bus. Coll.: .57P3536.  Elec. Coll.: A10434098.
       Abstract:  IKE, an icon editor utility that lets Microsoft Windows 3.0
       users create new icons and modify existing ones, is presented. The
       program cannot edit the specific icons Windows 3.0 itself supplies,
       but can build new icons from scratch for the Program Manager to use to
       represent programs. Users can download IKE from the PC MagNet on-line
       service. IKE must be able to both load and write files in the format
       detailed in the Windows Software Development Kit documentation. It
       takes advantage of device independent bitmaps and renders icons
       directly on a wide variety of display hardware. The program works by
       intercepting and processing certain Windows messages. It supports
       owner-drawn controls and creates buttons for each icon. IKE can be
       expanded to create and edit Windows cursors.

       2FILE and 2FLOPPY let you DISKCOPY by modem. (Utilities) (Column)
       (tutorial)  Stephen D. Cooper.
       PC Magazine, March 12, 1991 v10 n5 p369(5).  Mag. Coll.: 58M2892.
       Bus. Coll.: .56Z1752.  Elec. Coll.: A10382197.
       Abstract:  2FILE and 2FLOPPY are utility programs that allow files and
       disks to be copied, transmitted via modem and verified. 2FILE can
       generate a precise image of a floppy disk's contents and store the
       image on hard disk. The file can be transmitted via modem, or 2FLOPPY
       can use the image file to create a variable number of duplicate disks.
       2FLOPPY formats a disk, duplicates the 2FILE image and checks the
       copy. 2FILE only writes to a drive other than the source drive, and it
       adds 13 bytes to the size of the disk. 2FLOPPY prompts the user to
       enter new disks if more than one copy is created. Disks are divided
       into concentric tracks, which have variable numbers of sectors per
       track. A file allocation table (FAT) is stored on each disk to record
       the use of disk space.

       MBOOT.COM: a multiple boot program for your PC. (Utilities) (tutorial)
       .Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, Feb 26, 1991 v10 n4 p359(6).  Mag. Coll.: 58L2688. Bus.
       Coll.: .56W3612.  Elec. Coll.: A9392168.
       Abstract:  MBOOT, a utility that lets IBM-compatible microcomputer
       users keep up to four different startup configurations on one machine,
       is presented. Each session can use different versions of DOS or
       different CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files. The program is installed
       on a bootable disk drive via a menu-driven procedure and includes Add
       Session, Rename Session, Update and Return functions. It works by
       replacing the DOS boot record with its own custom boot record,
       deciphering the BIOS parameter block and using BIOS calls to
       manipulate disk data before the operating system loads. The program's
       three parts are the boot record, the extended boot record, and the
       installation code. The extended boot record reads the file allocation
       table into memory. The installation code checks for previous
       installation and allows session configuration using the menu router.

       LZSELECT: laser printer control the easy way. (Utilities)(includes
       related articles on grouping ESC commands, usingprinter macros,
       updates to previously-published utilities) (tutorial)  Jay Munro.
       PC Magazine, Jan 29, 1991 v10 n2 p347(7).  Mag. Coll.: 58E2920. Bus.
       Coll.: .56N3946.  Elec. Coll.: A9723331.
       Abstract:  LZSELECT, a memory-resident utility that pops up a menu of
       laser-printer commands from within most applications, is presented.
       The program is available for downloading on the PC MagNet on-line
       service and is written in the BASIC programming language. It does not
       use any data or configuration files and can be run from any DOS
       directory. Alt-key combinations or function keys access most of its
       features. The program does not impose rules on the user's command
       selections; users must exercise care to place items in the proper
       order. LZSELECT simplifies font selection and provides a variety of
       cursor and text commands.

       Free your VGA from CGA captivity with PRISM.EXE. (utility for
       displaying more colors on VGA monitors)(Utilities column - includes
       related articles on saturation and intensity, Video Graphics Array
       standard) (tutorial)  David Gerrold.
       PC Magazine, Dec 11, 1990 v9 n21 p463(8).  Mag. Coll.: 57L2902. Bus.
       Coll.: .55N3681.  Elec. Coll.: A9650095.
       Abstract:  PRISM.EXE, a utility that gives VGA users access to a wide
       variety of color palettes, is presented. A standard VGA display can
       produce 262,144 different shades but can only display 16 colors
       simultaneously; the PRISM palette editor lets users reassign DOS
       attributes to any color. The palette-editing screen shows the 16
       current DOS color attributes in squares of color across the top of the
       screen and has a frame of slider bars for controlling the levels of
       the color values in the active color. Users can edit palettes either
       with the mouse or with the cursor keys. The program has three
       user-selectable default settings for sound effects, mouse reaction
       speed and the rate at which one palette dissolves into the next. PRISM
       also has an Undo command and the ability to swap color pairs.
       Instructions for using the program are given. PRISM.EXE can be
       downloaded from the PC MagNet computer bulletin board.

       WSMOOTH: scroll through text files under Windows 3.0.
       (Utilities)(includes related article on updates) (tutorial)  Richard
       Hale Shaw.
       PC Magazine, Nov 13, 1990 v9 n19 p485(16).  Mag. Coll.: 57F3256. Bus.
       Coll.: .54U3650.  Elec. Coll.: A9557277.
       Abstract:  WSMOOTH, a utility that lets users scroll through text
       files under Microsoft Windows 3.0 using a convenient keyboard/mouse
       interface, is presented. WSMOOTH is a Windows-specific version of the
       earlier SMOOTH.COM program that takes advantage of a graphical user
       interface, letting the user navigate files with the mouse, control
       scrolling speeds and select files for display. It automatically
       invokes a file-selection dialog box if the user does not specify a
       file name. A new 'msecs' parameter lets users set the frequency at
       which the screen scrolls. 'Pixel rows' lets users adjust the number of
       rows of pixels that are scrolled, and pressing the number keys adjusts
       WSMOOTH's performance. The program works by handling messages with a
       switch statement and an event-driven timer. Special parameters
       indicate what type of action takes place, and the program executes
       code to terminate itself rather than letting messages accumulate in a
       message queue. WSMOOTH does not manipulate CRT or video adapter
       registers, relying instead on built-in scrolling routines.

       CARDFILE for the PM: it's time to retire your Rolodex. (Utilities)
       (tutorial)  Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, Oct 30, 1990 v9 n18 p361(8).  Mag. Coll.: 57C2970. Bus.
       Coll.: .54N3202.  Elec. Coll.: A9503103.
       Abstract:  PMCARD, an OS/2 Presentation Manager version of the
       CARDFILE utility for DOS, is presented. PMCARD is a simple database
       that stores and organizes names, addresses and telephone numbers. It
       presents users with 'Rolodex cards' that hold simple data fields. The
       program lets users enter text in any form or order desired and edit
       text in a card using the mouse. Instructions for manipulating stacks
       and searching for particular cards are given. One especially useful
       feature of PMCARD is its ability to dial a modem telephone number. It
       is configured to work with Hayes-compatible modems but can be
       configured to work with other systems. PMCARD is written in C and
       compiled under Microsoft C 5.1; specific program functions that
       perform special tasks are described. Users can download PMCARD from PC
       MagNet on CompuServe.

       PCBOOK makes your LaserJet print files in booklet form. (Utilities;
       includes related article on customizing PCBOOK, talking to your
       LaserJet printer and PCBOOK by modem) (column)  Jay Munro.
       PC Magazine, Oct 16, 1990 v9 n17 p425(7).  Mag. Coll.: 56K2924. Bus.
       Coll.: .53S3876.  Elec. Coll.: A9472549.
       Abstract:  PCBOOK eliminates all the hassles associated with
       reformatting a file so a README disk file can be COPYed to PRN. The
       PCBOOK utility prints README files on double-sided pages arranged in
       such a way that one fold creates a neat brochure that can fit right
       into the regular documentation booklet or diskette sleeve. PCBOOK is
       designed to work with Hewlett-Packard Co printers, including the
       LaserJet series II, IIP and III. PCBOOK can output four standard pages
       of 80 characters per line since it prints in landscape, on both sides,
       and uses the built-in Line Printer font rather than the default
       Courier. The utility does not require any additional printer memory or
       external fonts.

       CMDEDIT: the PC Magazine DOS command-line editor. (Utilities)(includes
       related articles on preparing initialization files, error handling,
       obtaining program by modem) (technical)  Ashok P. Nadkani.
       PC Magazine, Sept 25, 1990 v9 n16 p447(12).  Mag. Coll.: 56J2884.
       Bus. Coll.: .53P3331.  Elec. Coll.: A8831248.
       Abstract:  CMDEDIT, a command-line editor written by PC Magazine
       programmers, is discussed in technical detail. The program is a
       terminate and stay resident (TSR) utility that managers buffered
       keyboard input; it requires only 7.5Kbytes of memory space plus 1 to
       1.5Kbytes for a data buffer. Special parameters toggle automatic
       recall of command histories, instruct the program to use insert mode
       for user-typed characters, or install the program in silent mode so
       that the machine does not beep on certain errors. A symbol-definition
       facility lets the user abbreviate frequently used commands. CMDEDIT
       has its own set of keypad and Ctrl-key commands that replace the
       rudimentary DOS text editing facilities. It also provides a set of
       directory stack commands that are more flexible than the DOS CD
       command. CMDEDIT lets the user define a sequence of command lines as a
       macro, find the values of string variables and display all
       currently-defined macros and symbols from the DOS prompt.

       For your eyes only: keeping files private in a PC-based office.
       (Utilities)(includes related articles on programming a bouncing ball
       to career around the screen during graphics blanking, on an alternate
       approach to creating a file security program and on PC Utilities that
       have been published to date) (tutorial)  Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, Sept 11, 1990 v9 n15 p387(6).  Mag. Coll.: 56F2844. Bus.
       Coll.: .52W4840.  Elec. Coll.: A8792378.
       Abstract:  This tutorial provides the documentation for, and a
       discussion of, CONCEAL.COM, a computer program that is down-loadable
       from PC MagNet. The program is designed to provide office users with a
       way to secure their files against unwanted intrusion. CONCEAL.COM
       features password protection and a screen blanking function to protect
       sensitive files from prying eyes. The password feature is a low-level
       security function that will enable users of CONCEAL.COM to lock
       certain files on a disk so that they require a password for access.
       The screen blank feature will enable users to specify a given key that
       will automatically blank the screen, or a function that will blank the
       screen after a certain period of inactivity.

       Compile your batch files for added speed with BAT2EXEC. (Utilities)
       (tutorial)  Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, August 1990 v9 n14 p415(8).  Mag. Coll.: 56B2342.  Bus.
       Coll.: .52R4465.  Elec. Coll.: A8673412.
       Abstract:  DOS batch files, like other interpreted programs, are often
       extremely slow. BAT2EXEC, a batch language compiler that reads ASCII
       batch files and produces .COM programs that perform the same
       functions, is presented. The output .COM program can execute DOS
       commands, set environment variables and run other programs. It should
       not be used on AUTOEXEC.BAT or on batch files that run memory resident
       programs. BAT2EXEC compiles batch files by determining what command is
       on each line and then calling a routine that parses the command into
       machine code. A comparison of an actual batch file and the .COM file
       created by BAT2EXEC is presented. COPYFILE.BAT checks to see if a file
       exists and then copies it. The .COM file performs the same functions
       but is loaded into memory and executed by DOS' COMMAND.COM. It does
       not echo each line to the screen and does not end when the user runs
       other batch files.

       PMVIEW: a Presentation Manager file browser. (Utilities, includes a
       related article on how to obtain utilities from PC Magazine)
       (tutorial)  Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, July 1990 v9 n13 p355(7).  Mag. Coll.: 55L3066.  Bus.
       Coll.: .51W3881.  Elec. Coll.: A8538436.
       Abstract:  Users who have converted from DOS computing to the OS/2
       environment have left behind their utility programs for doing things
       like file browsing. This tutorial provides a file browsing utility
       called PMVIEW that can be downloaded from PC MagNet, as well as
       complete documentation for this Presentation Manager utility. PMVIEW
       enables users to quickly scan a file without having to enter an
       editor. The program will allow files to be viewed as either ASCII text
       or in hexadecimal. The program also comes with a search feature that
       will find a given phrase or will allow easy movement within a file.
       Other features of the program include a movable, resizable window,
       configurable color and font size, and mouse or keyboard compatibility.

       Getting a good look at how DOS allocates your memory blocks. (includes
       related articles on downloading utilities, IBM Workstation
       Program)(Column) (tutorial)  Earl F. Glynn.
       PC Magazine, June 12, 1990 v9 n11 p329(7).  Mag. Coll.: 55G2528. Bus.
       Coll.: .51T4463.  Elec. Coll.: A8508302.
       Abstract:  MEMMAP, a DOS utility that displays all allocated memory
       blocks and the variables in each environment block, is presented. The
       Turbo Pascal 5.0 program displays a list of memory control block
       segments; block size in bytes; the owner segment; and the type and
       name of the file to which each block is allocated. Users can minimize
       wasted memory by loading memory-resident (TSR) programs with the
       smallest possible set of environment variables; loading TSRs before
       PATH or SET commands in AUTOEXEC.BAT files; and avoid re-executing
       AUTOEXEC.BAT after boot-up if it has TSRs that re-install themselves
       multiple times. MEMMAP uses memory control blocks (MCBs) to store
       memory data and addresses dynamic variables with pointers.

       Introducing PAN.COM, the Program Animator. (Utilities) (includes
       related articles on the PAN command set, tips for creating PAN
       scripts, extending PAN and PC Utilities by modem)(a correction to this
       article appears in the January 28, 1992 issue, page 23) (Tutorial)
       Pete Maclean.
       PC Magazine, May 15, 1990 v9 n9 p253(17).  Mag. Coll.: 55D1728. Bus.
       Coll.: .50W2992.  Elec. Coll.: A8329650.
       Abstract:  PAN.COM is a Program Animator that is designed to automate
       microcomputer applications. It is essentially a universal script
       language utility that provides users the capability for adding opening
       menus, scheduling automatic operations and customizing program
       operations. For each job it does, PAN.COM requires a command script.
       Writing PAN command scripts is a relatively easy task for anyone who
       has a working knowledge of BASIC and is familiar with the script
       language of a communications program or the macro language of a
       spreadsheet program. A number of ready-made PAN scripts are presented.

       TYPEFAST and TPFST-AT give your keyboard pizzazz. (utility improves
       keyboard sensitivity) (includes related article on updates to earlier
       programs, how to obtain source code by modem, compatibility
       issues)(Utilities) (tutorial)  Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, April 24, 1990 v9 n8 p287(5).  Mag. Coll.: 54M2770. Bus.
       Coll.: .50S4615.  Elec. Coll.: A8276494.
       Abstract:  A program that speeds up typing by increasing keyboard
       sensitivity is presented. TYPEFAST is a memory-resident utility for
       XT- and early AT-class machines that links keyboard and timer
       interrupts and fills the keyboard buffer with repeat keystrokes at a
       user-selectable rate. Newer AT and PS/2 machines have BIOS support
       that lets users directly modify the keyboard's 'typematic' rate;
       TPFST-AT gives the user access to otherwise inaccessible features of
       the AT hardware. Both programs require a macro assembler and a
       specified set of commands. TYPEFAST consists of two interrupt
       handlers, one of which monitors key presses and releases while the
       other stuffs repeat characters into the buffer. TPFST-AT uses the BIOS
       to change the typematic rate, making it a faster and better program
       for machines whose hardware supports it. A detailed technical
       description of both programs is given.

       Protect your data with PCDATA, the data integrity toolkit. (virus
       detection and correction program; includes related articles on
       downloading program by modem, batch files)(Utilities) (tutorial)
       Wolfgang Stiller.
       PC Magazine, Feb 13, 1990 v9 n3 p263(12).  Mag. Coll.: 53G2550. Bus.
       Coll.: .49N3657.  Elec. Coll.: A8064740.
       Abstract:  PCDATA, a virus detection and protection program for
       IBM-compatible microcomputers, is presented. PCDATA is a coordinated
       toolkit consisting of eight assembly-language programs and 19 batch
       files, each written with built-in help. The batch files drive the
       programs but do not make use of all their functions. Initializing the
       toolkit consists of establishing the initial integrity of the system;
       creating a 'rescue' system with backups of all files; installing the
       toolkit through a custom CHKFILE program; and creating integrity check
       files. Booting from the PCDATA 'Check' diskette is the easiest way to
       use it. PCDATA determines whether any changes in data have occurred;
       the user must differentiate between authorized changes and those that
       may signal corruption. Instructions for recovering corrupted data and
       for customizing the toolkit are given.

       6th annual awards for technical excellence.  Bill Machrone.
       PC Magazine, Jan 16, 1990 v9 n1 p97(13).  Mag. Coll.: 52K2772.  Bus.
       Coll.: .48T4911.  Elec. Coll.: A7948318.
       Abstract:  The sixth annual PC Magazine Awards for Technical
       Excellence saw awards given to a number of excellent software packages
       and hardware products, including Quattro Pro and NetWare 386 3.0,
       Autodesk Animator, Roland LAPC-I and IBM Audio Visual Connection.
       Awards were given in the categories of applications, connectivity,
       development tools, entertainment-after hours, graphics, hardware,
       operating environments, portables, printers and utilities.

       Utilities: PCREMOTE lets you work at the office without leaving home.
       (column)  Terry Lahman.
       PC Magazine, Jan 16, 1990 v9 n1 p287(7).  Mag. Coll.: 52K2948.  Bus.
       Coll.: .48T5083.  Elec. Coll.: A7952518.
       Abstract:  PCREMOTE allows a user to access and operate a remotely
       located computer via modem. The user just runs the program on the
       office machine before going home and leaves the power turned on. This
       allows the user to call the office computer (host) from the home
       computer (remote). When the connection is made between the two systems
       via modem and the password verified, keystrokes from the remote
       computer are sent to the host and data from the host is received and
       displayed on the remote screen. The program does not interfere with
       the host system's normal operations. Its monitor and keyboard continue
       to function, allowing the user to put the program to additional uses.
       Reversal of the installation procedure allows the user to demonstrate
       a program stored on the system. Guidelines for using the program are
       discussed.

       Give yourself a smart DOS command line with ALIAS. (includes tear-out
       summary of DOS commands)(Utilities) (technical)  Jeff Prosise and
       Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, Dec 26, 1989 v8 n22 p253(8).  Mag. Coll.: 52H2072. Bus.
       Coll.: .48R4504.  Elec. Coll.: A7921286.
       Abstract:  An ALIAS utility can help the programmer control the MSDOS
       command line as if it were a regular word processing environment. The
       programmer can move the cursor or delete by character, by word or
       directly to the end of the command line. Copies of ALIAS.COM are
       available for downloading from PC MagNet. ALIAS.ASM, the assembly
       language source code, and ALIAS.BAS, the BASIC listing, are also
       available for downloading. After downloading ALIAS, the user can use
       arrow and other word processing keys such as control and delete to
       manipulate the command stack. The 'alias' part of ALIAS comes from its
       ability to replace words or long command lines with shortened
       representations of the words or commands. ALIAS is highly
       manipulatable, and should make working with MSDOS a bit easier.

       Compress and expand the files on your hard disk automatically.
       (Utilities)(two type-in programs) (column)  Ross M. Greenberg.
       PC Magazine, Dec 12, 1989 v8 n21 p299(12).  Mag. Coll.: 52F2668. Bus.
       Coll.: .48P4198.  Elec. Coll.: A7887680.
       Abstract:  Two utility programs, PCMANAGE and DCOMPRES, which
       automatically compress and decompress inactive files on hard disks,
       are presented. Compression techniques work by replacing repetitive
       character strings with brief codes; PCMANAGE and DCOMPRES use the
       popular Lempel-Ziv-Walsh algorithm. DCOMPRES, a memory-resident
       utility, tracks file accesses and indexes files in each subdirectory
       by the date of last access. PCMANAGE checks the INDEX.CMP file created
       by DCOMPRES and automatically compresses files that have not been used
       in six months. INDEX.CMP files have a default read-only file attribute
       to protect against accidental deletion; this is easily changed.
       DCOMPRES decompresses the files automatically when the user requests
       access. A special byte in the program checks the status of the file
       and invokes a 'do_decomp' routine.

       Easy binary file transfer through ASCII text files. (Utilities.)
       Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, Nov 28, 1989 v8 n20 p319(8).  Elec. Coll.: A7805332.
       Abstract:  A program that converts binary files such as spreadsheets
       into ASCII form for easy electronic-mail file transfer is presented.
       DEBUGSCR.COM works with all E-mail services and does not require
       intermediate protocols or reconversion at the receiving end. The
       program converts files of up to 60Kbytes in length into ASCII text
       script files with instructions that tell DOS' DEBUG utility how to
       create the original file. The script files do not do checksums and
       must edit out captured communications headers at the receiving end.
       DEBUGSCR depends on DEBUG's ability to write binary files to disk and
       makes use of the DOS utility's command set. It loads a specific
       register with the file size to determine how many bytes to write to
       disk and converts data into hexadecimal instead of decimal ASCII
       because all hexadecimal values can be represented by two ASCII bytes.

       Control the brightness of your VGA screen. (user type-in program,
       DIMMER) (Utilities)  Douglas Boling and Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, Oct 17, 1989 v8 n17 p297(10).  Mag. Coll.: 51K1126. Bus.
       Coll.: .46Z4388.  Elec. Coll.: A7634414.
       Abstract:  DIMMER is a user type-in program that controls VGA monitor
       brightness by user keyboard command. Parameters for control are
       entered on the command line or at a specified interval after the last
       keystroke. Without parameters, the Alt-up arrow and down arrow keys
       increase or decrease screen brightness. Original intensity can be
       returned by pressing Alt-home. The memory resident program listings in
       assembly language and BASIC are included as well as operational
       instructions. Step-by-step instructions on the program design are
       given as well.

       What's wrong with Windows? (Microsoft Windows - deficiencies)  Bill
       Howard.
       PC Magazine, Sept 12, 1989 v8 n15 p116(2).  Mag. Coll.: 51A1425. Bus.
       Coll.: .46S4051.  Elec. Coll.: A7506206.
       Abstract:  Microsoft's Windows graphical user interface gives the user
       access to many excellent applications but has a number of serious
       deficiencies. It is slow and not much easier to use than DOS. It lacks
       object orientation, which means that a user cannot move a file from
       directory to directory with the mouse or zero in on all files created
       by one application. The program also is missing the DOS extending
       utilities found on common DOS shells, and its Dynamic Data Exchange
       method of transferring data streams is overly complex. Its soft font
       installer is awkward to use, and many users complain that the 386
       version of Windows crashes easily. Microsoft plans to correct many of
       these problems in version 3.0 of Windows, due in the fall of 1989.

       Utilities. (how to check fragmented disks)  Bob Flanders and Michael
       Holmes.
       PC Magazine, August 1989 v8 n14 p355(10).  Mag. Coll.: 50K1656. Bus.
       Coll.: .46N4912.  Elec. Coll.: A7420808.
       Abstract:  Suggestions on how to use the CHKFRAG utility to determine
       when it is necessary to defragment the files on the hard disk are
       discussed. When programs take longer than usual to load, it is usually
       an indication that they have become fragmented. CHKFRAG checks the
       files stored on the hard disk and provides an on-screen report and an
       ERROR-LEVEL value that can be used within a batch file to call up a
       defragmenting program, if necessary. Since CKFRAG produces an
       on-screen report, it can also be used as a stand-alone utility. A copy
       of CKFRAG.EXE and a C source code listing can be downloaded from PC
       MagNet.

       Utilities. (includes related articles on extended memory management
       and on EMS40.SYS Device Driver) (column)  Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, June 27, 1989 v8 n12 p277(17).  Mag. Coll.: 50C1616.
       Bus. Coll.: .45R4079.  Elec. Coll.: A7326808.
       Abstract:  Extended memory (RAM of more than 1Mbyte) installed in an
       IBM PC AT or compatible requires the use of a dedicated expanded
       (LIM-EMS) memory board and associated driver software for maximum
       performance. However, The EMS40.SYS utility allows users to access
       extended memory without using a dedicated board, supplying access to
       huge Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheets and similar applications without the
       expense. The program works by making the computer perceive expanded
       memory as extended memory. EMS40.SYS is backwards-compatible with
       software written for earlier versions of the LIM-EMS standard. The
       design and implementation of the program is discussed in detail.

       Moving up to Dbase IV. (PC Lab Notes)(includes related article on
       transaction processing in Dbase IV) (column)  Richard Hale Shaw and
       Tony Lima.
       PC Magazine, June 13, 1989 v8 n11 p297(13).  Mag. Coll.: 50A1864.
       Bus. Coll.: .44Z4601.  Elec. Coll.: A7596639.
       Abstract:  With its large number of new features and improvements from
       past versions, Ashton-Tate's Dbase IV requires about as much user
       education for those moving from dBase III as altogether new users. To
       help assist users in their switch to the new environment, an
       introductory primer is offered with helpful tips on the various new
       functions and commands. Included in the discussion are the major
       enhancements in indexing, managing multiple file relations, the
       various new end user commands and user-defined functions, windows,
       pop-up-down menus and lists, strategies for converting dBase III Plus
       programs to dBase IV, compiling code, the BUILD and DBLINK utilities,
       arrays and automatic multiuser features.

       Putting color in the OS-2 kernel. (Utilities)(includes related article
       on the differences between the program as compiled in assembly
       language and C) (column)  Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, June 13, 1989 v8 n11 p329(8).  Mag. Coll.: 50A1896. Bus.
       Coll.: .44Z4633.  Elec. Coll.: A7596891.
       Abstract:  COLOR is an OS-2 protected mode utility for setting
       foreground and background screen colors from the full screen (text)
       command line. User type-in listings a re provided with complete
       instructions on the program's design and use. Listings are supplied in
       assembly language, BASIC and C. The differences between each listing
       is functions is described.

       Handling colors on your laptop. (Utilities) (column)  Michael J.
       Mefford.
       PC Magazine, March 28, 1989 v8 n6 p263(9).  Mag. Coll.: 48L1520. Bus.
       Coll.: .43U3812.  Elec. Coll.: A7062718.
       Abstract:  MONO.COM is a memory-resident utility that converts
       displays of color applications to monochrome which is legible on
       laptop computers and other monochrome screens with limited intensity
       ranges. The program is toggled on and off with a programmable hot key
       combination whose default is Alt-M. User type-in listings in BASIC and
       assembly language and full directions for use are provided. How the
       program was created and what the various codes within it perform are
       described.

       Background copying without OS-2. (Utilities) (technical)  Douglas
       Boling.
       PC Magazine, Jan 17, 1989 v8 n1 p289(12).  Mag. Coll.: 47K1946. Bus.
       Coll.: .42P4415.  Elec. Coll.: A7190359.
       Abstract:  Users can avoid productivity delays encountered when their
       microcomputer's COPY command moves programs to a RAMdisk in the
       AUTOEXEC file. The method is to put BCOPY, which is presented as a
       type-in program, in the AUTOEXEC.BAT files. BCOPY copies files in the
       background so the user's work goes on interrupted. BCOPY can even be
       instructed to remove itself from memory after it has finished
       performing its function, thus freeing up precious RAM. BCOPY, composed
       of resident code, non-resident code and the data buffer, is a good
       example of how to combine file operations with a
       terminate-and-stay-resident utility.

       DOS 4.0: lessons on PC interfaces. (column)  Jim Seymour.
       PC Magazine, Oct 31, 1988 v7 n18 p77(2).  Mag. Coll.: 46J1592.  Bus.
       Coll.: .40Y3763.  Elec. Coll.: A7014019.
       Abstract:  Version 4.0 of Microsoft's MSDOS has several enhancements
       in addition to the optional visual shell that has been the center of
       much publicity. The new MSDOS operating system has the ability to
       create hard-disk partitions that exceed the 32Mbyte limit of previous
       MSDOS versions. This is a welcome ability, but one that has been
       available through utilities for more than 2 years. Another feature
       allows MSDOS 4.0 to make use of the Lotus-Intel-Microsoft Expanded
       Memory Specification (EMS). The visual shell is best suited to
       entry-level microcomputers, and will leave a strong market for
       third-party DOS shells. DOS is falling further and further behind in
       the race to provide a standard graphical interface, and the visual
       shell does nothing to alleviate the problem. Other interfaces,
       including Microsoft Windows and Hewlett-Packard's New Wave, are also
       discussed.

       Speed up hard disks with DCACHE. (includes related articles on MS-DOS
       cache, disk added statistics, and using expanded memory) (Utilities)
       (column)  Douglas Boling.
       PC Magazine, Oct 11, 1988 v7 n17 p255(14).  Mag. Coll.: 46F2320. Bus.
       Coll.: .40U4352.  Elec. Coll.: A6998993.
       Abstract:  DCACHE is an IBM PC-compatible hard disk utility that may
       help speed up computing performance by cutting disk access times. The
       memory-resident disk cache keeps the most recently-used data from the
       disk in its own section of RAM. DCache can return the data to MS-DOS
       without accessing the disk. Users can download it form the PC MagNet
       bulletin board or type-in either the Assembly Language or BASIC
       program listing. DCache can use the Lotus-Intel-Microsoft expanded
       memory specification for caches larger than 256Kbytes, be disabled on
       command and can be removed from memory if the user desires. DCache can
       reduce sequential read times 60 to 80 percent and write times can be
       lowered between 10 to 30 percent. The time savings for random reads
       and writes are dependent on the size of the cache.

       Microsoft's OS-2 programming tools. (Productivity: Environments)
       (column)  Charles Petzold.
       PC Magazine, Oct 11, 1988 v7 n17 p283(8).  Mag. Coll.: 46F2348. Bus.
       Coll.: .40U4380.  Elec. Coll.: A6999011.
       Abstract:  The Microsoft OS-2 Programmers Toolkit for $350 contains
       OS-2 programming tools, utilities, and documentation for 217 OS-2 1.0
       function calls. The toolkit is used with the OS-2 compiler or
       assembler and contains OS-2 function-call documentation. The Microsoft
       package is similar and superior to the IBM OS-2 Toolkit and the OS-2
       Technical Reference. The Microsoft Toolkit includes on-line help and
       better documentation than the IBM versions. The programmers Toolkit
       has the programming utilities, OS-2 1.0 import libraries, on-line
       help, and 52 sample programs. The Microsoft documentation is geared
       heavily toward C programmers while the IBM documentation is geared to
       Assembly programmers . IBM and Microsoft try to assure compatible code
       but C programs that call OS-2 functions are not source-code compatible
       between IBM C and Microsoft C. A user type-in program in assembly
       language demonstrates macro functions.

       Making your own screen fonts. (Utilities) (Productivity) (column)
       Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, Sept 13, 1988 v7 n15 p305(14).  Mag. Coll.: 46A1598.
       Bus. Coll.: .39Z4304.  Elec. Coll.: A6889175.
       Abstract:  The FONTEDIT user type-in program in assembly language and
       Basic is presented and described. FONTEDIT lets users modify or create
       EGA or VGA character fonts with a keyboard or mouse and save the fonts
       as DOS-loadable files. Modified or new fonts are then loaded by
       entering their names at a DOS prompt. Instructions for use are
       supplied. Only users with EGA or VGA cards and monitors are able to
       use the program.

       RAM snooping with RAMVIEW. (Utilities) (Productivity) (column) Frank
       Dever and David Thomas.
       PC Magazine, Aug 1988 v7 n14 p367(13).  Mag. Coll.: 45K1680.  Bus.
       Coll.: .39T4815.  Elec. Coll.: A6821395.
       Abstract:  RAMVIEW is a user type-in program in BASIC and assembly
       language that offers a pop-up display and string searches of RAM
       contents in both ASCII and hex, from within an application. The memory
       resident utility is opened with a default hotkey of ALT-R and is
       exited with the Escape key. The program can be removed from memory by
       typing RAMVIEW a second time. Users may scroll through RAM memory with
       cursor key controls. Type-in listings are given, in addition to
       descriptions of how the program works.

       Putting an end to hotkey hassles. (Utilities) (Productivity)  Robert
       L. Morton.
       PC Magazine, June 28, 1988 v7 n12 p277(9).  Mag. Coll.: 45C2470. Bus.
       Coll.: .38U4241.  Elec. Coll.: A6737119.
       Abstract:  ALLKEYS is a user type-in program in BASIC and assembly
       language that alternately disables and enables the hot keys used by
       pop-up memory-resident programs; by releasing the key combinations,
       they are made available to other application programs. The program is
       loaded twice, once before and once after the loading of the various
       memory resident utilities in which hot keys will be used. By pressing
       CTRL - ALT - Z the hot keys are disabled. Pressing the three keys
       again returns the hot keys.

       Compare simplifies file matchups. (Utilities) (Productivity) Michael
       J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, June 14, 1988 v7 n11 p297(13).  Mag. Coll.: 45A1686.
       Bus. Coll.: .38T5284.  Elec. Coll.: A6682683.
       Abstract:  COMPARE.COM is a user type-in program in assembly language
       or BASIC which displays the differences between two text or two binary
       files. The files need not be the same length, and paragraph
       reformatting changes introduced by word wrap are ignored. The user
       enters COMPARE followed by the name of the two files to be compared in
       ASCII text. Files in which the 'high bit' is set can be made
       displayable in ASCII by entering the optional W switch after the last
       file; a file to be compared in binary mode is done with the optional B
       switch.

       Staying in sync with your keyboard. (Toggle) (utilities)
       (Productivity)  Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, May 31, 1988 v7 n10 p299(6).  Mag. Coll.: 44L5283. Bus.
       Coll.: .38Q3178.  Elec. Coll.: A6638049.
       Abstract:  TOGGLE is a user type-in program in BASIC and assembly
       language that provides a software toggle and an on-screen report of
       the states of the keyboard CapsLock, NumLock, and ScrollLock keys. The
       program is entered at a DOS prompt. Without any parameters, a simple
       report on the current status of the three toggle keys is given.
       Individual parameters for each key are available. By including the
       line TOGGLE -n in an Autoexec.Bat file, the NumLock key will boot up
       in the off state when using the 101-key Enhanced keyboard. This key is
       usually booted in the on position.

       Funk Software adds a worksheet tool set to its 1-2-3 add-in lineup.
       (The Worksheet Utility) (product announcement)  Michael W. Muchmore.
       PC Magazine, Feb 16, 1988 v7 n3 p53(1).  Mag. Coll.: 43A0482.  Bus.
       Coll.: .35Y1338.  Elec. Coll.: A6178060.

       Running programs painlessly. (RUN for easy access to executable files
       from deep within a hard disk subdirectory; Utilities) (column)
       Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, Feb 16, 1988 v7 n3 p321(10).  Mag. Coll.: 43A0748. Bus.
       Coll.: .35Y1604.  Elec. Coll.: A6170912.
       Abstract:  RUN is a user type-in program in BASIC and assembly
       language that allows users to boot programs buried in hard disk
       subdirectories without having to search for them or use change
       directory commands. Program listing in assembly language and BASIC are
       provided; the latter, when run, converts the program to a run-time
       version, RUN.COM. It will execute any .COM, .EXE, or .BAT file from
       any disk directory without the usual path specifications or directory
       commands.

       Dress up your HELP screens. (the PAINT screen editor program)
       (Utilities) (column)  Jeff Prosise.
       PC Magazine, Jan 26, 1988 v7 n2 p291(17).  Mag. Coll.: 42L0762. Bus.
       Coll.: .35W1752.  Elec. Coll.: A6167892.
       Abstract:  A listing is given for the PAINT.COM full-screen editor
       with color and monochrome capabilities and line-drawing features
       modeled after those contained in WordPerfect. The utility has been
       used to create help screens as well as to prototype screens for
       applications and experiment with different color combinations and
       layouts in pop-up window design. The speed of molding and reshaping
       new screens is sufficient for the program to be used with any video
       application. The program completes a trio of DOS utilities for
       generating custom screen menus. The first two, CAPTURE to capture a
       snapshot of a current screen, and HELP to wait in the background for
       the signal to replace a current display with a predefined screen
       image, were listed in the last issue. PAINT is compatible with IBM's
       PC and PS-2 lines.

       Awards for technical excellence: and the winners are... (review of
       microcomputer hardware introduced in 1987)  Bill Machrone.
       PC Magazine, Jan 12, 1988 v7 n1 p175(8).  Mag. Coll.: 42J0962.  Bus.
       Coll.: .36N1636.  Elec. Coll.: A6162180.
       Abstract:  Awards for technical excellence in the computer industry in
       1987 are presented in a dozen categories comprised of five or less
       finalists and a winner. The winners are: Lucid 3D and Microsoft Excel
       for Windows (tie) for application software; Publisher's Type Foundry
       for desktop publishing; QuickBASIC 4.0 and Turbo Pascal 4.0 (tie) for
       development tools; AutoShade for graphics software; Microsoft
       Windows-386 for operating environments; Zenith Perfect Monitor, Model
       ZCM-1490 for hardware; LIM-EMS 4.0 for utilities; Compaq Deskpro
       386-20 for desktop computers; Compaq Portable 386 for portable
       computers; 3Com 10M-bps twisted pair Ethernet for connectivity;
       William C. Lowe for IBM's development of the Micro Channel
       architecture; and Douglas Englebart of McDonnell Douglas Information
       Systems Group for the Lifetime Achievement Award.

       Capturing your printer output: PRN2FILE lets you capture the printer
       output from programs and such DOS commands as Ctrl-PrtSc and
       Shift-PrtSc into a file you can edit with your word processor. (in
       Utilities)  Tom Kihlken.
       PC Magazine, Dec 22, 1987 v6 n22 p341(12).  Elec. Coll.: A6112504.
       Abstract:  PRN2FILE is a resident program that allows a user to to
       redirect printer output to a file, which can be edited with a word
       processor before it is printed. Originally, it seemed that PRN2FILE
       could be a short program, but programming around the limitations
       imposed by the fact that current versions of DOS do not do
       multitasking required considerable code. PRN2FILE has its own
       limitations that can cause problems: for example, if large quantities
       of data are dumped to a printer at once, and if the buffer used to
       spool the output is not large enough, an overflow can occur. A way to
       create a larger buffer is suggested, as a solution.

       Reader beware. (Mace Utilities Condense program) (letter to the
       editor)  John Bales.
       PC Magazine, Nov 10, 1987 v6 n19 p17(2).  Elec. Coll.: A6141722.

       The problem with PostScript emulation: software, not hardware,
       handshaking. (changing the laser printer handshaking protocol from
       software control to hardware control)  Bill O'Brien.
       PC Magazine, Nov 10, 1987 v6 n19 p398(2).  Elec. Coll.: A6063842.
       Abstract:  More non-Apple laser printers are being bundled with Adobe
       Systems' PostScript page composition language, making it more
       accessible to PC-based desktop publishers. Communications between PCs
       and printers with PostScript are not always harmonious because PCs are
       used to hardware handshaking, which means they ignore the software
       pause request sent by the printer after printing a few pages. The
       Laser Connection is the only printer manufacturer to address the
       problem by supplying a utilities disk with its PS Jet and PS Jet Plus
       laser printers and controller boards that changes the handshaking
       protocol for users. Two approaches for changing the handshaking
       protocol for non-Laser Connection printers are described: one uses
       BASIC and a short utility that affects the PostScript batch mode only,
       and the other treats the printer like a modem and runs a
       telecommunications program on the PC.

       Make your contribution. (to the Utilities column)
       PC Magazine, Oct 13, 1987 v6 n17 p436(1).  Elec. Coll.: A6126626.

       A directorywide file manager. (program utilities)  Michael J. Medford.
       PC Magazine, Sept 29, 1987 v6 p351(17).  Mag. Coll.: 41A1340.  Bus.
       Coll.: .33U3886.  Elec. Coll.: A5200543.

       Doing what DIR doesn't. (program listing for DR.COM) (in
       Programming-Utilities) (technical)  Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, Aug 1987 v6 n14 p437(15).  Elec. Coll.: A5081623.
       Abstract:  File management from a directory listing in DOS can be
       facilitated by loading the DR.COM computer program listed. Source code
       for the program is provided in assembly language, and a Basic program
       is listed that will create DR.COM. DR.COM provides alphabetical sorts
       of directory listings in DOS formats that allow the user to sort the
       listings five ways, while maintaining 'complete control' over the
       directory display.

       DOS lives: IBM's bold new move. (MSDOS 3.0)  Paul Somerson.
       PC Magazine, July 21, 1987 v6 n13 p175(6).  Elec. Coll.: A5158787.
       Abstract:  IBM's $120 DOS 3.3 enhancements include many user-requested
       improvements. For example, the new APPEND command gives users a path
       extender program, making it easier for the user to find nonexecutable
       files that were immune to previous DOS PATH searches. Another
       enhancement allows users to extend the MODE address to four serial
       ports and to handle speeds of up to 19,200-bps. Users can also set the
       DATE and TIME of the IBM CMOS memory automatically. Enhanced batch
       file utilities allow users to eliminate screen clutter by inhibiting
       ECHO OFF and to save space by using the CALL command to pull up an
       additional batch file for execution. The way MS-DOS 3.3 handles
       foreign alphabets is confusing, and IBM has removed documentation
       references to DEBUG.

       Your pop-up stenographer. (programming utilities)  Steve Holzner.
       PC Magazine, July 21, 1987 v6 n13 p433(7).  Elec. Coll.: A5158843.
       Abstract:  The PAD.COM pop-up notepad utility is a memory-resident
       notepad that can pop up at any point to hold notes or comments. This
       is an enhanced version, which adds features; for example, you can
       color letters or backgrounds. PAD.COM uses 5.5Kbytes of RAM; PAD.COM
       can be accessed even if the user is in the middle of another
       application. Instructions are provided for downloading PAD.COM from PC
       Magazine's Interactive Reader Service.

       Power tools: utilities for Turbo Pascal. (debugging and toolbox
       software utility programs fro Turbo Pascal)  Stephen Randy Davis.
       PC Magazine, June 23, 1987 v6 n12 p235(2).  Elec. Coll.: A5158754.
       Abstract:  Turbo Pascal from Borland International has become so
       popular since its introduction in 1983 that an entire support market
       has developed around this software package. The utilities offered for
       use with Turbo Pascal are of two types: debuggers, and toolboxes.
       Toolboxes enhance features are provided by Turbo Pascal, while
       debuggers can accelerate Turbo Pascal programming efforts and
       facilitate testing the resulting programs. This brief overview of
       Turbo Pascal third-party product offerings precedes reviews of several
       such products.

       Your everyday reminder. (program listing for a memory-resident
       calendar utility) (programming-utilities) (column)  Michael J.
       Mefford.
       PC Magazine, June 23, 1987 v6 n12 p331(11).  Elec. Coll.: A5158767.
       Abstract:  A program listing for the memory-resident REMINDER
       appointment calendar is provided. REMINDER is a 'tickler file' that
       prompts microcomputer users to perform certain duties or meet
       scheduled appointments, by signalling audibly and providing pop-up
       windows upon keystroking. REMINDER can also be programmed to display a
       digital clock in the screen's upper right corner.

       Technical knockouts: Why everyone needs a hard disk. (adding a hard
       disk to your PC)  Winn L. Rosch.
       PC Magazine, June 9, 1987 v6 n11 p109(7).  Elec. Coll.: A5090813.
       Abstract:  Hard-disk storage devices, with their storage capacity and
       quick retrieval of files, are convenient, saving the user the trouble
       of shuffling floppy disks. The storage capabilities of hard disks are
       very great when compared to the storage capacities of floppies; prices
       for hard disk data storage have dropped to about $10 per Mbyte from a
       high of around $100 per Mbyte. The needs of the user must be
       correlated to the features available from a hard disk in order to
       determine whether a particular hard disk is best for an intended
       application. Hard disk performance can be improved through the use of
       the following programs: Disk Optimizer from SoftLogic Solutions; Disk
       Organizer from Soft GAMs Software; and The Norton Utilities sold by
       Peter Norton Computing.

       How to handle your hard disk.  Paul Somerson.
       PC Magazine, June 9, 1987 v6 n11 p199(20).  Elec. Coll.: A5090838.
       Abstract:  Learning how to set up and maintain a hard disk properly
       helps a microcomputer user to work intelligently and efficiently.
       Various utilities are available to secure hard-disk data without
       frustration and to give a user mastery of the hard-disk system.
       Sometimes utility programs like Mace Utilities or The Norton Utilities
       can be used to recover parts of files after a 'head crash', but the
       capabilities of such programs are limited; hence, backups. Tips and
       techniques are provided for proper management of subdirectories.
       Useful program listings are included.

       Commonsense security: practical advice for keeping your PC and data
       secure.  Robin Raskin.
       PC Magazine, April 28, 1987 v6 n8 p106(2).  Elec. Coll.: A4975200.
       Abstract:  A list of common-sense data security practices for personal
       computer managers and users is provided. Among the suggestions are to
       keep sensitive data on hard disks off the machine when not needed, use
       cryptic names for sensitive files, use the security devices already
       available on the systems, and dispose of printouts carefully. Other
       suggestions include being neat, being creative with user IDs and
       passwords, keeping sensitive passwords out of communications, and
       using disks marked with physical 'fingerprints'. Other tips are to use
       removable media, protect against unintentional data erasure, use
       security utilities, and be careful when employees are dismissed or
       resign with hard feelings.

       NetWare utilities fill the duty roster.  Howard Marks.
       PC Magazine, April 14, 1987 v6 n7 p273(11).  Elec. Coll.: A4756911.
       Abstract:  The performance of the NetWare network management program's
       print spooler can be enhanced through the use of utility programs.
       Unfortunately, the NetWare print spooler is not easy to work with,
       although it is a powerful performer. There are three steps for
       document preparation on a shared NetWare network printer: first, use
       the DOS prompt's spool command to tell NetWare that production must be
       redirected to the shared printer; second, print the document using an
       applications package; finally, tell the software that the document
       that uses the endspool command with the DOS prompt is at its end.

       Instant access to directories. (programming-utilities) (column) Jeff
       Prosie.
       PC Magazine, April 14, 1987 v6 p313(15).  Mag. Coll.: 38H0638.  Bus.
       Coll.: .30V1610.  Elec. Coll.: A4753074.

       The utilities that DOS forgot.  Paul Somerson.
       PC Magazine, Feb 24, 1987 v6 n4 p176(2).  Elec. Coll.: A4689644.
       Abstract:  DOS shell programs can be used to improve the effectiveness
       of DOS. The PC Magazine Programming-Utilities column includes some
       very popular DOS utilities: ATTR.COM, BAC.COM, BROWSE.COM, FREE.COM,
       and SIZE.COM., among others. The SEARCH.COM utility listed and
       described in the column in the current issue can be used to locate
       files on a hard disk or to find certain text contained on those files.
       Instructions for downloading the utilities from the magazine's
       Interactive Reader Service or assembling them from the included .ASM
       listings are provided. Three dozen of the utilities have been put on a
       single disk, the PC Magazine Utilities, volume 1; future volumes are
       planned annually. Volume 1 is being offered free with new
       subscriptions and renewals.

       Digging deeper into DOS, part 1. (column)  Ethan Winer.
       PC Magazine, Feb 24, 1987 v6 n4 p277(8).  Elec. Coll.: A4689672.
       Abstract:  The use of unfamiliar DOS commands and options will allow
       programmers to increase their microcomputer productivity to power-user
       proportions. DOS switches represent various 'slash' options that can
       be used after a command word - for example, (slash)W and (slash)P can
       be attached to DIR to produce additional filenames on the screen. COPY
       is another popular DOS command with optional switches; the (slash)A
       and (slash)B COPY switches represent ASCII and binary, respectively.
       The CHKDSK command is used by most users to find out the quantity of
       disk space that is left or the amount of RAM left with TSR utilities.
       Entry comparisons can be made on the command line for various entries
       through the use of batch file variables.

       Files fly with DIREX. (programming - utilities) (column)  Steven
       Holzner.
       PC Magazine, Jan 13, 1987 v6 n1 p295(11).  Elec. Coll.: A4644298.
       Abstract:  DIREX is a DOS file management program which simplifies the
       process of managing multiple directories containing numerous files. A
       full range of copying, deleting, protecting and unprotecting, and
       directory commands are included in the 1.8Kbyte program. Complete
       instructions on how to use DIREX are included.

       Freeze out file filchers. (programming utilities) (column)  Jeff
       Prosise.
       PC Magazine, Dec 23, 1986 v5 n22 p285(7).
       Abstract:  There are many programs for long-term data protection, but
       the FREEZE utility listed here in assembler code and BASIC allows a
       user to protect confidential information in a running personal
       computer when the user needs to leave it for a short time. FREEZE is a
       memory-resident program which allows the user to blank the screen,
       freeze the execution of the application program, insert a password,
       and leave. The data will be impossible to touch, and even Ctrl-Alt-Del
       will not work until the password is re-entered. The utility is
       compatible with most memory-resident programs and should be loaded at
       the beginning of a work session, most easily by entering a file call
       in AUTOEXEC.BAT.

       The right setup. (the use of printer setup utility programs)
       (directory)  John Dickinson.
       PC Magazine, Nov 11, 1986 v5 n19 p368(2).
       Abstract:  Utility programs that can be used for smoother
       implementations of printers are listed by the product and vendor
       directory. These prewritten commercial utility programs save users the
       time and trouble of developing their own printer setup utilities. Some
       new printer utility programs will initialize laser printers, based on
       the Laserjet standard established by the manufacturer Hewlett-Packard.

       Quick-change artistry. (programming-utilities, command interface)
       Michael J. Mefford.
       PC Magazine, Nov 11, 1986 v5 n19 p373(5).  Elec. Coll.: A4580578.
       Abstract:  With the use of the CHANGE.COM command, a user can
       instantly alter the text strings and the ASCII codes used in the file,
       and do it even faster than it would take to load the word processor.
       So that the CHANGE code is kept to a minimum, valid file size must be
       limited to 40,000 bytes; the word processor can be used for larger
       files. Over 50 percent of the CHANGE.ASM code is used for the tiresome
       task of parsing the command line. The comprehensive 8088 string
       instructions MOVSB and CMPSB are used by CHANGE for file revisions and
       file transfers.

       The great pop-ups: the public sounds off. (computer utilities)
       (column)  Jim Seymour.
       PC Magazine, Oct 28, 1986 v5 p101(2).  Mag. Coll.: 36A1144.  Bus.
       Coll.: .26Y3513.  Elec. Coll.: A4473940.

       Weed out excess files with XDEL. (programming utilities) (column)
       Ronald Czapala.
       PC Magazine, Sept 30, 1986 v5 n16 p267(8).  Elec. Coll.: A4421348.
       Abstract:  XDEL is a DOS utility that, like many other such utilities,
       enhances DOS's disk management capabilities, specifically, it allows
       users to scan through a directory quickly and delete superfluous
       files, a function usually accomplished by using the DIR command and
       entering DEL for each file to be deleted. XDEL.COM speeds up the
       process considerably by allowing files to be scanned one at a time and
       deleted with a single keystroke. XDEL clears the screen and shows the
       drive specified by users when loaded, as well as the current target
       directory and the file-matching specification from which files will be
       selected. The process of scanning and deleting with XDEL is described,
       as are the design and operation of the utility and the benefits it
       provides to programmers. A sidebar describes how to download XDEL.COM
       from the Interactive Reader Service, and suggestions for ways
       programmers could enhance the utilityare discussed.

       Exploring the EGA, part 2. (programming-utilities) (column)  Charles
       Petzold.
       PC Magazine, Sept 16, 1986 v5 n15 p287(14).  Elec. Coll.: A4367059.
       Abstract:  In the second of a two-part series on IBM's Enhanced
       Graphics Adapter (EGA), the use of fonts, the 512-character set and
       different screen formats, such as the 43-line display, are described,
       and an introduction to EGA graphics is provided, along with a listing
       and description of the EGADEMO graphics demonstration program written
       in C. The programs that are presented are in the form of DEBUG
       'script' files, and most use BIOS calls and memory locations
       documented in the EGA Technical Reference, which is available as an
       update to IBM's Options and Adapters Technical Reference. The text
       modes in the EGA work differently than those in the older Color
       Graphics Adapter (CGA) from IBM, with the adapter memory containing
       both the font table and the ASCII codes of the displayed characters
       rather than storing the ASCII codes in video memory; several other
       differences are described. Also described are the process of making
       font changes through BIOS, changing the displayable rows, problems
       with cursor emulation, new print and clear screen routines, use of the
       EGA feature connector for 120-column display, and an on-screen
       font-editor program for easy creation of custom fonts.

       Exploring the EGA. (part 2; enhanced graphics adapter utilities;
       includes article on building an EGA feature connector)  Charles
       Petzold.
       PC Magazine, Sept 16, 1986 v5 p287(13).  Mag. Coll.: 35F3134.  Bus.
       Coll.: .26N2623.  Elec. Coll.: A4332491.

       Exploring the EGA, part 1. (programming utilities) (column)  Charles
       Petzold.
       PC Magazine, Aug 1986 v5 n14 p367(9).  Elec. Coll.: A4316884.
       Abstract:  The IBM Enhanced Graphics Adapter (EGA) was introduced in
       the fall of 1984 along with the company's Enhanced Color Display
       (ECD), but since that time software supporting the devices has been
       slow in developing. Now that the EGA is perceived as the industry
       standard for high-resolution personal computer color graphics, it is
       time to explore the board more extensively than is provided in the
       documentation that accompanies the product or that which is included
       with the many clones of the EGA that have been introduced. In the
       first of a two-part series on enhancing the operation of the EGA,
       explanations are provided of its different features, and 12 utility
       programs are listed that allow the EGA to be customized to fit the
       needs of individual users. Creating the utilities, the variety of
       video modes supported by the EGA, experimenting with the EGAMODE, a
       comparison with other adapters, how color works on the EGA, the EGA
       border problem, permanent color mapping, and topics that will be
       discussed in the second part of the series are described.

       Give your PC added utility. (utilities for note making, dialing, and
       printing; includes article on commercial desktop organizers)  Winn L.
       Rosch.
       PC Magazine, Aug 1986 v5 p353(7).  Mag. Coll.: 34M4544.  Bus. Coll.:
       25T1486.  Elec. Coll.: A4317530.

       Exploring the EGA, part 1. (enhanced graphic adapters; program
       utilities for IBM PC graphics)  Charles Petzold.
       PC Magazine, Aug 1986 v5 p367(9).  Mag. Coll.: 34M4558.  Bus. Coll.:
       25T1600.  Elec. Coll.: A4317535.

       How important is speed? (column)  Jim Seymour.
       PC Magazine, June 24, 1986 v5 n12 p87(2).  Elec. Coll.: A4366869.
       Abstract:  Personal computer users addicted to fast performance would
       go broke in no time trying to add every device that promised a
       processor speed increase of five to ten percent, but the accent on
       speed evident in the industry in the recent past shows no signs of
       abating soon. The IBM PC AT was a quantum leap above the original
       8086-based PC, the advent of accelerator cards promised to improve the
       speed of the 6-MHz 80286-based machines, the 8-MHz AT-compatibles
       claimed even faster speeds, the RT PC runs even faster, and the
       introduction of 80386-based personal computers will increase the
       speeds even more. Measuring the processor speeds of systems can be
       tricky, but the SysInfo program in The Norton Utilities toolkit is
       very useful, giving approximate performance levels on which to judge
       microcomputer performance. With the original PC based at 1.0, the AT
       rates5.7, 8-MHz clones rate over seven, 12-MHz clones rate up to 13.3,
       and 80386 prototypes were measured at over 16. The applications for
       which fast machines can be used and the peripheral enhancements they
       will require are discussed.

       Changing DOS file attributes. (column)  Charles Petzold.
       PC Magazine, June 10, 1986 v5 n11 p249(8).  Elec. Coll.: A4274151.
       Abstract:  File attributes get little coverage in either PCDOS
       documentation or in utilities written to make management of PCDOS
       files easier, but they are much more important than many users assume.
       Version 3.0 of PCDOS includes an ATTRIB program that is able to change
       only the Read-Only file attribute, but to change the other file
       attributes, ATTR was written, serving as a complete DOS file attribute
       utility, or as close to a complete utility as the operating system
       will allow. The program is listed in assembly language and in BASIC,
       and a copy of the utility is available for noncommercial use through
       the Interactive Reader Service for those wishing to download it using
       the Xmodem protocol. A discussion of file attributes in general,
       suggested uses for the ATTR utility, how the utility can be applied
       (with an example provided), and a description of some of its
       limitations are included.

       Search and identify.  Peter Norton.
       PC Magazine, May 13, 1986 v5 n9 p81(3).  Elec. Coll.: A4240829.
       Abstract:  Methods are described by which computer programs can
       identify the machines on which they are running. The two approaches
       programs can take to discover what brand and model of machine they are
       working with are to figure it out themselves or to ask the user. The
       latter is the preferred method, done during installation, but
       automatic identification would provide users, manufacturers and
       programmers with a uniform and convenient way to allow programs to
       adjust to the hardware they are running on. The method used in The
       Norton Utilities is described, as is the way in which personal
       computers can be identified through their ROM BIOS.

       Looking for the ultimate pop-up.  Jim Seymour.
       PC Magazine, May 13, 1986 v5 n9 p97(2).  Elec. Coll.: A4240830.
       Abstract:  The problems with pop-up utility programs are that when
       more than one are loaded in memory they tend to collide, disabling
       each other's features and possibly freezing up the machine, that many
       require that they be loaded last or cannot work with other programs
       that take over the keyboard, and that they require considerable
       amounts of memory. The memory-collision problem seems to be in the
       process of being solved by an informal collaboration between
       Microsoft, Borland International and Living Videotext, along with
       other memory-resident software publishers, but the functionality of
       the programs appears to have been overrated. Some suggested new
       functions for pop-up utilities are: a pop-up Hewlett-Packard 12C
       financial calculator, an invisible annotation utility, and a pop-up
       clock.

       Shareware: nominal fees can yield big value.  Tom Stanton.
       PC Magazine, May 13, 1986 v5 n9 p195(9).  Elec. Coll.: A4240852.
       Abstract:  Shareware is software intended to allow users to acquire
       programs without the risk inherent in many software purchases,
       providing users with the chance to test the program before they buy it
       and relying on their honesty to send the nominal (usually under $50)
       fee to the designer. The idea of shareware, also called user-supported
       software or freeware, began in the early 1980s with PC-Talk, a
       communications program written by Andrew Fluegelman, which in its
       latest incarnation, PC-Talk III, is still a success. Shareware differs
       from public software in providing registered users, those who have
       sent in the fee to the publisher, with a level of support, usually
       over the telephone. The categories of shareware discussed include
       communications packages, database managers, utilities, and two
       packages, Syslog and ANSIdraw, which defy categorization; screen
       displays from many of the packages, downloading tips, and sources for
       the shareware, including electronic bulletin boards, are included.

       Looking for the ultimate pop-up. (computer program utilities)  Jim
       Seymour.
       PC Magazine, May 13, 1986 v5 p97(2).  Mag. Coll.: 33J4654.  Bus.
       Coll.: .23Z1294.  Elec. Coll.: A4240896.

       Just looking, thank you. (Programming-Utilities) (column)  Charles
       Petzld.
       PC Magazine, March 25, 1986 v5 p253(6).  Mag. Coll.: 33D1652.  Bus.
       Coll.: .23P0794.  Elec. Coll.: A4181623.

       CAD Support: An Embarrassment of Riches.  Glenn Hart.
       PC Magazine, March 11, 1986 v5 n5 p169.  Elec. Coll.: A662589.
       Abstract:  Users have found that no single computer-aided design
       package includes all the functions required for all applications,
       which has led many to turn to third-party support software to add
       functionality and special features. These third-party vendors are much
       more likely to support CAD packages with large market shares, such as
       AutoCAD from Autodesk, than they are to support programs with smaller
       market shares, but the growing interest in CAD software has led to new
       versions of other programs as well. More than 140 AutoCAD-compatible
       packages are included in the company's applications catalog, including
       templates, menu-creation utilities, interchange-conversion programs
       for a number of protocols, font programs, coordinate geometry
       programs, and bill of materials and estimating programs, along with
       many others.

       Sizing up your files. (Programming-utilities, 1986-No.1)  Art Merrill.
       PC Magazine, Jan 14, 1986 v5 p221(8).  Mag. Coll.: 33A0220.  Bus.
       Coll.: .21U0666.  Elec. Coll.: A4097517.

       KEY-FAKEing keystrokes. (Programming-utilities, 1985-no.26)  Charles
       Petzold.
       PC Magazine, Dec 24, 1985 v4 p215(7).  Mag. Coll.: 31K4636.  Bus.
       Coll.: .22V3562.  Elec. Coll.: A4070567.

       Printer Utilities Make the Difference.  Alfred Poor.
       PC Magazine, Dec. 10, 1985 v4 n25 p259-263.  Elec. Coll.: A655035.
       Abstract:  Nine printer utility programs are described and evaluated.
       Printer utilities facilitate sending commands to the printer by
       allowing users to operate the machines without learning the ASCII
       escape code sequences of hexadecimal values. The utilities described
       are the IBM-Toshiba Printer Interface 1.2A ($79.95), the
       ColorScreenPrint from Applications Techniques ($79.75), Marvel Print
       from Marvel Software ($70 to $95), PrintStar from MicroStar ($49),
       WordStar Patcher from MicroCorp. ($100), Lettrix from Hammerlab Corp.
       ($98.50), Printer Boss fro Connecticut Software Systems ($139.95),
       Personal Print Control from IBM Entry Systems Division ($29.95), and
       PrintMan from Qualitas Inc. ($59). Tables are included with basic
       information on the products.

       Lightning strikes; Borland International has earned a reputation for
       shaking up the industry with high-quality, low-priced business
       software. The company's new information retrieval utilities promise to
       stun the marketplace.  Paul Somerson.
       PC Magazine, Dec 10, 1985 v4 p112(7).  Mag. Coll.: 31A2656.  Bus.
       Coll.: .20R1365.  Elec. Coll.: A4056319.

       Green screen 1-2-3 graphics. (programming-utilities, 1985 - no.25)
       Charles Petzold.
       PC Magazine, Dec 10, 1985 v4 p283(4).  Mag. Coll.: 31A2820.  Bus.
       Coll.: .20R1528.  Elec. Coll.: A4056337.

       Waitasec while I get that. (programming-utilities, 1985 no.24)
       Charles Petzold.
       PC Magazine, Nov 26, 1985 v4 p215(7).  Mag. Coll.: 31A2474.  Bus.
       Coll.: .20Y4365.  Elec. Coll.: A4033913.

       Deleting made complete; programming-utilities. (1985-no.21)  Steven
       Holzner.
       PC Magazine, Oct 15, 1985 v4 p221(4).  Mag. Coll.: 29K2496.  Bus.
       Coll.: .18V3766.  Elec. Coll.: A3980153.

       Off With Its Header.  L. Young.
       PC Magazine, Oct. 1, 1985 v4 n20 p223.
       Abstract:  The DEBUG function is helpful in eliminating unwanted
       header information from a large file. An option to DEBUG is using
       programs by Norton Utilities that can manage short file changes.
       Another method is to replace the unwanted control characters with
       blanks. A program listing shows the BASIC program used to change
       unwanted information to blanks.

       Micro-VERSAL and AST-Utilities.
       PC Magazine, Oct. 1, 1985 v4 n20 p231.
       Abstract:  Micro-VERSAL and AST-Utilities from Advanced Software
       Technologies enables PC-DOS to read, write, and format disk for the
       CP-M, HDOS, and TRS-DOS operating systems. Utilities included with
       micro-Versal are programs allowing users to choose standard formats
       and to specify and save special parameters. The AST-Utilities
       collection includes the ability to display the files of any formatted
       disk, to format or index fixed length files, to read formatting or
       copying by choosing the parameters. AST-Utilities also has a disk
       editor and two object units that interact with assembly programs to
       allow reading and writing in foreign disk formats. Micro-Versal is
       priced at $79.95, and AST-Utilities sells for $49.

       Printer Utilities.  A. Poor.
       PC Magazine, Sept. 17, 1985 v4 n19 p219-220.  Elec. Coll.: A640555.
       Abstract:  Printer utility programs notify the printer of what
       typeface the user wants. There are three basic categories of printer
       utility programs: printer configuration programs, programs that allow
       the use of the printer's native fonts or the program's more artistic
       fonts, and programs that control the printout of the document. Twelve
       mini-reviews of printer utility programs are included.

       New on the Market: Templates, Utilities & Programming Tools.  D.
       Obregon.
       PC Magazine, July 23, 1985 v4 n15 p230-231.
       Abstract:  Demo-Tutorial Generator ($6,800) from Trillian Computer is
       a programming tool which helps create product demonstrations. It can
       be run interactively and used to develop on-line tutorials. SYSLOG
       ($29.95) from Apex Resource keeps a record of log-on and log-offs,
       IDs, and elapsed time by project category. Easy Color for Lotus 1-2-3
       user assign colors in screens and graphs. It requires PC-DOS to
       operate. dFLOW ($129) from Wallsoft Systems is a utility which aids
       dBASE 11 and 111 programmers by cross-referencing variables and
       formatting program listings.

       Control Your PC from Anywhere with CITY.  S. Manes.
       PC Magazine, March 5, 1985 v4 n5 p198-205.  Elec. Coll.: A594054.
       Abstract:  Instructions on how to control a modem-equipped PC from any
       terminal or microcomputer in the world are included. CITY, a resident
       DOS command, lets one change DOS's default input-output from the usual
       console to any other character-oriented device. CITY must be used with
       caution and forethought. Programs and utilities that don't follow DOS
       rules cannot be run and used remotely. Virtually every extant DOS
       function can be used. Characters may be doubled on the terminal
       because commands will be echoed by the PC. However, there is a
       terminal software option to disable the echo. In order to have truly
       remote control an IBM PC with functional asynchronous communications
       port, PC-DOS 2.1, BASICA 2.1 and a Hayes-compatible intelligent modem,
       cable and a phone line are needed. A password checking program and a
       basic file transfer program are listed.

       C Utilities.
       PC Magazine, Nov. 13, 1984 v3 n22 p354.
       Abstract:  Software Labs' C Utilities is a collection of programming
       tools for the C language. The package includes screen control,
       peripheral control, graphics, animation and math utility functions.
       List price is $119. A photograph of the product is included.

       Live Free with UNIX.  E.S. Raymond.
       PC Magazine, May 29, 1984 v3 n10 p145-154.  Elec. Coll.: A552610.
       Abstract:  UNIX is an operating system and a suite of software
       designed to be easily understood, used and designed by software
       designers. The UNIX environment consists of a kernel and a set of
       utilities- the tools and commands wrapped in a shell, i.e., command
       language that the terminal user sees. Utilities include compilers for
       C, FORTRAN 77 and Pascal, two different line editors and a screen
       editor, electronic mail and powerful tools for text formatting,
       searching data patterns, finding file differences and for
       semiautomatic maintenance of code systems. Directories and file names
       can be fourteen characters long and there is no depth limit to
       subdirectories.

       Understanding UNIX.  M. Zachmann.
       PC Magazine, May 29, 1984 v3 n10 p155-159.  Elec. Coll.: A552611.
       Abstract:  A UNIX user is faced with a large number of specialized
       terms and concepts explained here and a glossary of seventy-six UNIX
       terms is included. The differences between UNIX Version 7 and PC-DOS
       Version 2.0 are that UNIX is multiuser, multitasking, distinguishes
       between upper and lower case file names and can have more than a
       single period while PC-DOS is single user, does not distinguish upper
       and lower case file names and allows only a single period. UNIX
       operating system comes with more than 100 programs, the Bourne shell
       which handles user interactions, a full-screen editor, a preprocessor
       for math equations and a large set of utilities.

       Learning the PC with Loved Ones.  H. Waldrop.
       PC Magazine, May 1, 1984 v3 n8 p248-255.  Elec. Coll.: A545508.
       Abstract:  Five homes where family members share the use of an IBM PC
       are explored regarding uses and family interaction. Uses include text
       processing, accounting, database information utilities, games and
       graphics. Children and adults have learned from each other and some
       combine their efforts to relate to business ventures.

       Microsoft C Unveiled.  D. Clapp.
       PC Magazine, Oct. 1983 v2 n5 p503-508.
       Abstract:  The Microsoft C compiler system using systems programming
       language C, is expected to become the MS-DOS-XENIX language system of
       choice. C is compared to Pascal and found to be less rigid and faster.
       There are impressive functions, macros and data types. The data types
       range from floating point precise to six or seven decimal digits to
       double that which is precise to fifteen or sixteen decimal digits. The
       C package contains three manuals covering implementation and two disks
       which contain the compiler proper, LINK and LIBrary programs,
       utilities, assembly language routines and sample programs.

       Marketplace: The New View from Digital Research.  G. Hughes.
       PC Magazine, July 1983 v2 n2 p403.
       Abstract:  Digital Research announced, in July 1983, plans to release
       versions of its languages and utilities that will run under the PC-DOS
       operating system on IBM Personal Computers. The marketing manager of
       Digital Research, Carmen Governale, commented on some of the
       reasoning. Digital Research is committed to supporting the independent
       software vendor. By allowing program codes in Digital Research
       languages to be transportable between operating systems, the market
       becomes larger for programs written on either.



    V.  A sample Simtel directory of PC Magazine archives
        from the January, 1995 "10,000 MSDOS Shareware programs"
        CD-ROM

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
    V.  A sample Simtel directory of DOS PC Magazine archives
        for January 14, 2001
            ftp://mirrors.aol.com/pub/simtelnet/msdos/pcmag/

00_pcmag.zip   49405  980706  ZIP dir listings of PC Mag. files in this dir
asm1.zip       36701  860604  Source for DOS utilities from PC Magazine
asm2.zip       35861  860604  Source for DOS utilities from PC Magazine
asm3.zip       32202  860727  Source for DOS utilities from PC Magazine
asm4.zip       32658  860604  Source for DOS utilities from PC Magazine
async4.zip      4721  871128  Interrupt driven serial line terminal routines
cardfl11.zip    4929  890306  PcMag upd v1.1: 3x5 card file mgr, 150 cards
chain_4.zip     8040  871116  CHAIN function for TP4
copy.zip       11810  871220  Copy utility from PC magazine
dirmag2.zip    25991  880831  DIRMAGIC v2.0, upgraded DR/RN/CO from PC Mag.
dirmat31.zip   18000  960417  PC Mag update: Compare 2 dirs, report matches
extend_4.zip   11840  871025  TP4 routine to open up to 252 files
fifo.zip        3049  910317  This file was missing from PcMag VOL10N08.ZIP
gwlites.zip     6538  891006  Corrected LITES.COM, with docs from PC Mag
lites11.zip     3997  900209  PC Mag update: LITES v1.1, w/docs from PC Mag
pcindx01.zip   19015  901221  Index of PC Magazine files to January, 1991
pcm8890a.zip  646039  910221  PC Magazine reviews index, Jan 88 - Jun 90
pcmagcom.zip   31249  861112  PCMag.com files & descriptions as of 7-13-87
pcmagdoc.zip   22474  860928  PC Magazine utilities documentation
pcmi9510.zip   41664  960407  PC Magazine Index: Index of V3N25 to V14N18
pcmng11a.zip   48578  900120  PcMag update for VOL8N21: PCMANAGE v1.1 update
pcmpr89.zip    24271  891209  PCMag Productivity columns index, Jan-Dec 1989
pp704.zip       5555  880125  Power Programmer files from VOL7N04.ARC
slice13.